Magnet Therapy

Magnetic therapy is an alternative medical practice that places magnets on specific areas of the body to help alleviate pain.  Many of the magnets are incorporated into rings, bracelets, shoes, clothing and therapeutic magnetic mattresses.


The theory behind magnet therapy is that magnets accelerate the metabolism.  This acceleration helps oxygen and nutrients reach a specific location where there is an injury in an attempt to repair the damage.

There are various types of magnet therapy.  Some of the more commonly used are:

Static magnetic field therapy: With this method, you touch a magnet to your skin by wearing a magnetized bracelet, bandage, shoe insole or mattress pad.

Electronically charged magnetic therapy: With this method, the magnets used are electrically charged with an electric pulse.

Magnetic therapy with acupuncture: With this method, a magnet is placed in the same section of your body that an acupuncturist would focus on during an acupuncture session in an attempt to clear your energy pathways or channels.

Magnet therapy has been utilized in treating pain associated with arthritis, wound healing, insomnia, headaches and fibromyalgia.  While usually safe, there are some side effects to magnet therapy which may include nausea and dizziness.

If you have a pacemaker, an insulin pump or are pregnant it is not recommended that you seek magnet therapy.  Additionally, if you are scheduled for an x-ray or MRI, it is recommended that you remove all magnets prior to testing.

Since there haven’t been many studies on magnetic field therapy, so there is no substantiated proof that it is effective in the treatment of pain.

As with any treatment, be sure to check with your doctor before you begin.  If you are interested in pain management and would like to speak with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Dangers of Distracted Cycling

More people are cycling these days; for pleasure or for work. With the increase in the number of people using bicycles to get from place to place, there has also been an increase in the number of accidents involving cyclists.

Some of these accidents are due to distracted motor vehicle drivers but others are due to cyclists not paying full attention to the road.

The two most common distractions that lead to accidents are cyclists using ear buds to listen to music or talk on the phone while pedaling. This limits their ability to hear car horns and other audio cues in their surroundings. Another distraction is using hand- held mobile devices. Using cellphones or other mobile devices while riding creates a visual distraction and prevents cyclists from watching the road for signs of danger and holding their handlebars properly.

To ensure their safety, people on bicycles must use their vision and hearing to give their full attention to their environment.

Cyclists should obey the rules of the road, be mindful of keeping their eyes and ears free from distractions, always wear a helmet, and keep in mind that motorists may not be paying attention.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Delmi Arias

July’s Employee Spotlight shines on Delmi Arias, RN, and Clinical Analysis for the Performance Improvement Department at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Delmi Arias is a valued employee who works collaboratively with the MediSys Sepsis and Stroke Coordinators as well as conducting chart audits for regulatory compliance and reports findings to the New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH).

In addition to her degree as a Registered Nurse, Delmi is studying for a Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing.  She is slated to graduate by the end of 2019.

Delmi credits much of her drive and success to her loving family. “I like to lead by example and I am blessed with doing what I love and having the support of my ‘Better Half’ Junior and children, Daniel, Anisa and Rosie.”

When not at work, Delmi loves binge watching countless episodes of her favorite show, “The Office,” being adventurous by exploring the city with her children and listening to Pastor T.D. Jakes sermons for inspiration.

“Serving this community and enhancing our patient’s stay and quality of life is a couple of the things I love best about my work. But, there are challenges too.  I am tasked with learning all the latest guidelines from the NYS DOH for management of the Stroke and Sepsis programs.  The guidelines are always changing.  As soon as I think ‘I GOT IT!’ the guidelines change.  It keeps me at the top of my game. “

Flushing Hospital Medical Center congratulates Delmi Arias for receiving July’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Winsome “Winnie” Kpana, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Winnie:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working in Flushing Hospital for 38 and a half years

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: I work in The Women’s Health Center.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:   In looking back, I’ve come to realize that my passion to become a nurse started in my early childhood. I grew up in a small rural community where there were only one doctor and one nurse. I was always fascinated by the nurse as she visited my school or as I visited the health clinic. She was always smiling, caring and patient as she cared for my bruises and cuts or as she administered a vaccine. I knew then, that one day, I too would become a nurse because I wanted to be ” Just Like Her”. I chose a career that is challenging, exciting and interesting. Being a nurse has allowed me to fulfill my life’s desires and  I strive to make a difference in the lives of my patients.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The best part of my job starts with caring for and helping others. I worked as a pediatric nurse for over 33 years. I saw children at their best and at the worst. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing the smiling face of a child who has recovered from a serious illness or a traumatic experience. It is also very humbling to know that my nursing care contributed to that child’s recovery. Over the past six years, I have switched course and I am working in an ambulatory setting, The Women’s Health Center, where I offer service to the OB/GYN patients. Education is the key to success and as an ambulatory nurse, I am always teaching women how to care for themselves and their unborn child. There are times when I feel not only as a nurse but as an extension of a patient’s family. We share in the joy of welcoming a newborn baby. For me, This is nursing at its best.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are Tremors And Why Do They Occur?

A tremor is an involuntary, rhythmic muscle contraction that results in shaking movements in one or more parts of the body. They most commonly affect the hands but can also occur in the arms, head, vocal cords or legs. Tremors can come and go, but they can also be constant. They can take place without reason or occur as a result of another disorder.  While they are not life threatening, tremors can be debilitating, making it very difficult to perform many daily tasks.

tremor, Flushing Hospital, Parkinson's Disease, Traumatic Brain Injury

Tremors are usually caused by a problem in the parts of the brain that control movement. Tremors typically appear in middle aged to older adults. They affect men and women equally and can run in families.

Tremors can occur on their own or be a symptom associated with a number of neurological disorders, including:

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Stroke
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Parkinson’s disease

Others reasons why someone may experience tremors include: a reaction to medications, alcohol abuse, anxiety disorders, mercury poisoning,  an overactive thyroid, or liver or kidney failure. Some tremors may be triggered by or worsen during times of stress or strong emotion, when an individual is physically exhausted, or when a person is in certain postures or makes certain movements.

Tremors are classified into two main categories, resting or action;  a resting tremor occurs when a person’s hands, arms, or legs shake when they are at rest. Often, the tremor only affects the hand or fingers and is often seen in people with Parkinson’s disease.  An action tremor occurs with the voluntary movement of a muscle. Most types of tremors are considered action tremors.

A neurologist can diagnose a tremor during an physical examination and medical history based on:

  • Whether tremors occur when the muscles are at rest or in action
  • The location of the tremor on the body
  • The frequency and severity of the tremor.

Your doctor will also check for other neurological abnormalities such as impaired balance or speech, or increased muscle stiffness. Blood or urine tests can rule out a thyroid malfunction, medication interaction or alcohol abuse as a cause. A CT Scan or MRI may be performed to determine if the tremor is the result of a brain injury and motor skill assessments can administered to determine functional limitations.

Although there is no cure for most forms of tremors, treatment options are available to help manage symptoms. In some cases, a person’s symptoms may be mild enough that they do not require treatment. In other cases, treating the underlying cause can reduce or eliminate the tremor. If no known cause is determined, medications, focused ultrasound, or surgery may be considered as treatment options.

To make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Do You Treat a Bloody Nose?

How to treat a nose bleedMost of us have suffered a nose bleed at some point in our life, and many have often wondered “what is the reason?”

Our noses contain many blood vessels that help warm and humidify the air we breathe. These vessels are easily damaged or injured because they lie on the interior surface of our nose. When they get injured, the result is often a bloody nose.

Thankfully, in most instances, nosebleeds aren’t serious and they can be treated quickly and easily at home. When one occurs, you should follow these simple tips:

  • Remain calm – Getting nervous can actually make you bleed more
  • Sit upright – You nose will stop bleeding quicker if you keep your head above your heart
  • Lean forward. This will prevent blood from draining down the back of your throat
  • Pinch your nostrils closed. Press your thumb and index finger over your nostrils for approximately 10 minutes and breathe through your mouth. The pressure will make the blood stop flowing.

Once the bleeding has stopped, do not touch or blow your nose as it may start to bleed again. If it does, blow your nose to get rid of any blood clots. You can also spray a nasal decongestant in your nostrils and pinch them closed again.

Although you can’t always prevent a nosebleed, there are some things you can do to reduce the chances of getting one, such as:

  • Keep your nose moist – Dryness can cause nosebleeds. Swab a thin layer petroleum jelly inside your nostrils three times a day, including before going to bed.
  • Use saline spray – Spraying saline in your nostrils helps keep the inside of your nose moist.
  • Use a humidifier – Especially during the winter when the air is most dry
  • Don’t smoke – This can irritate the inside of your nose and dry it out.
  • Don’t agitate your nose – Placing your fingers inside your nose to scratch or pick it . Also avoid blowing your nose too hard as these actions can damage the blood vessels.
  • Avoid cold and allergy medications – They can dry out your nose. In some cases, certain medications can cause or intensify nosebleeds.

While the majority of nosebleeds are not cause for concern, you should see your doctor if the following take place:

  • The bleeding goes on for more than 20 minutes.
  • The bleeding was caused by an injury, such as a fall or something hitting your face.
  • You get nosebleeds often

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – Department of Volunteer Services

Volunteers are at the heart of the hospital, ensuring that patients are treated in an atmosphere of care. Flushing Hospital volunteers range in age from 16 to retired seniors. Junior volunteers are required to commit a minimum of 125 hours, while adults are required to commit a minimum of 200 hours. Many volunteers have been with the hospital for over 20 years and are considered as valued members of our staff.

Flushing Hospital volunteers are assigned to various roles throughout the hospital. Some of their responsibilities include comforting patients, assisting medical and administrative staff with various tasks, helping with gift shop sales, and attending to the pastoral needs of our multicultural community. Individuals become volunteers for a wide range of reasons, specifically school requirements, educational advancement, spiritual or community mindedness, career change or social networking. The hospital provides everyone with an opportunity to fulfill these needs and in return, reaps the rewards of their dedicated service.

To become a volunteer, please call 718-670-5439.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Division of Robotic Surgery Performs Minimally Invasive Colectomy Procedures

colectomy, Flushing Hospital, Robotic Surgery, Bowel Resection, Colon Cancer, Chron's Disease, Colitis, Colon, bowel obstruction

A colectomy, also known as a bowel resection, is a surgical procedure where a part of or the entire colon is removed.

The colon is part of the body’s digestive system, which removes and processes nutrients from foods and helps pass waste material out of the body. A colectomy may be required when the colon fails to function as it should.

This may occur for a variety of issues or conditions including:

  • Bowel obstruction – A blockage that keeps food or liquid from passing through your small or large intestine.
  • Bowel perforation – A hole in the wall of the small or large intestine. This is a serious and potentially fatal condition that may require immediate surgery.
  • Crohn’s disease – An inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation of your digestive tract, leading to abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition.
  • Ulcerative colitis – A condition that causes irritation and swelling of the small intestine that can lead to the development of sores called ulcers.
  • Colon cancer – A type of cancer where tiny growths called polyps develop in the colon or rectum over time and eventually become cancerous.

Depending on the issue and the severity, there are a number of different types of colectomy procedures, such as:

  • Total colectomy–The removal of the entire colon
  • Partial colectomy (or subtotal colectomy) – The removal of part of the colon
  • Hemicolectomy- The removal of the right or left portion of the colon
  • Proctocolectomy– The removal of both the colon and rectum

Traditionally, patients with any of these conditions needing a colectomy would have open surgery. These procedures require doctors to make a long incision in the wall of the abdomen so they can see the colon directly.

Thankfully, Flushing Hospital offers patients a much more minimally invasive option. Through the acquisition of the da Vinci surgical platform, patients can now have colectomy procedures performed robotically.

During robot-assisted procedures, Flushing Hospital’s expert team of surgeons can guide the state-of-the-art da Vinci robot to make the smallest of incisions, resulting in less pain, minimal scarring, and faster recovery time.

If you are experiencing any form of irritable bowel disease that may require surgical intervention, please call Flushing Hospital’s Division of Robotic Surgery at 718-670- 3135 to learn how we can help.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ringworm

Ringworm- skin doctor queens new yorkRingworm is a common infection that results in circular-shaped rashes on the skin.  Contrary to what its name suggests ringworm is not caused by a worm but rather a fungus that thrives on multiple surfaces.

Ringworm can appear on just about any part of the body.  However, based on the location of the rash, it may be categorized by a different name.  For example, ringworm on the feet is known as athlete’s foot and ringworm on the groin is known as jock itch.

Symptoms of ringworm vary based on location. They can include:

  • Patches of hair loss
  • Scaling of the scalp
  • A small pimple on the scalp that becomes larger in size over time
  • Thickened, discolored or brittle nails
  • Flat-ring shaped rashes
  • Itching
  • Red, peeling, itchy skin between the toes
  • Red spots on the inner sides of the thigh

Ringworm is highly contagious and can be spread by:

  • Skin-to-skin contact with an infected person
  • Contact with an infected animal
  • Contact with objects or surfaces touched by an infected person
  • Prolonged contact with soil that is infected

Some people are more at risk for transmission than others.  Your chances of contracting an infection increases if you:

  • Are in close contact with animals or people who are infected
  • Share linens or clothing with someone who is infected
  • Live in a warm climate
  • Wear tight or restrictive clothing
  • Have a weakened immune system

You can reduce your risk of getting ringworm by:

  • Keeping your skin clean and dry
  • Avoid sharing linens and clothing with an infected person
  • Washing your hands after playing with pets with ringworm

Your doctor can diagnose ringworm by examining the infected area.   You may receive a prescription for antifungal medications that may include lotions, creams or pills to treat the infection. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Watermelon

One of the foods most closely associated with summertime is watermelon. It is tasty and quenches your thirst but did you know that it is also healthy for you ?

It is believed that watermelon may help in the prevention of diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure, heat stroke, kidney disorders, and macular degeneration.

 

Some of the known benefits of watermelon are:

  • It is high in lycopene, an antioxidant believed to curb cancer and also protect the skin from the sun’s rays
  • It contains an amino acid citrulline which may lower blood pressure and also lower the risk of a heart attack
  • It contains beta-cryptoxanthin which lowers joint inflammation
  • It contains vitamin A which is good for the eyes
  • It is 92% water and good for keeping hydrated and feeling full
  • It contains vitamins A, B6, and C which keeps the skin soft and supple
  • It is low in calories
  • It is high in potassium which is important for flushing out the toxins through the kidneys
  • It is easy to digest
  • The potassium and magnesium helps insulin to function properly which controls diabetes

One of the risks associated with eating watermelon is that if it is pre-cut, there is a chance of being exposed to salmonella. It must be refrigerated below 40 degrees and washed thoroughly before eating.

Enjoy your summer and make watermelon a part of your summertime snacks.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.