Department Spotlight – Department of Volunteer Services

Volunteers are at the heart of the hospital, ensuring that patients are treated in an atmosphere of care. Flushing Hospital volunteers range in age from 16 to retired seniors. Junior volunteers are required to commit a minimum of 125 hours, while adults are required to commit a minimum of 200 hours. Many volunteers have been with the hospital for over 20 years and are considered as valued members of our staff.

Flushing Hospital volunteers are assigned to various roles throughout the hospital. Some of their responsibilities include comforting patients, assisting medical and administrative staff with various tasks, helping with gift shop sales, and attending to the pastoral needs of our multicultural community. Individuals become volunteers for a wide range of reasons, specifically school requirements, educational advancement, spiritual or community mindedness, career change or social networking. The hospital provides everyone with an opportunity to fulfill these needs and in return, reaps the rewards of their dedicated service.

To become a volunteer, please call 718-670-5439.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Watermelon

One of the foods most closely associated with summertime is watermelon. It is tasty and quenches your thirst but did you know that it is also healthy for you ?

It is believed that watermelon may help in the prevention of diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure, heat stroke, kidney disorders, and macular degeneration.

 

Some of the known benefits of watermelon are:

  • It is high in lycopene, an antioxidant believed to curb cancer and also protect the skin from the sun’s rays
  • It contains an amino acid citrulline which may lower blood pressure and also lower the risk of a heart attack
  • It contains beta-cryptoxanthin which lowers joint inflammation
  • It contains vitamin A which is good for the eyes
  • It is 92% water and good for keeping hydrated and feeling full
  • It contains vitamins A, B6, and C which keeps the skin soft and supple
  • It is low in calories
  • It is high in potassium which is important for flushing out the toxins through the kidneys
  • It is easy to digest
  • The potassium and magnesium helps insulin to function properly which controls diabetes

One of the risks associated with eating watermelon is that if it is pre-cut, there is a chance of being exposed to salmonella. It must be refrigerated below 40 degrees and washed thoroughly before eating.

Enjoy your summer and make watermelon a part of your summertime snacks.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WellnessWednesday

Leonardo da Vinci, although best known as a painter, happend to be fascinated by science. Like any modern day scientist, he used observations, common-sense reasoning and research to find answers to satisfy the many questions he had regarding the health of the human body, mind and soul.

He cataloged his findings in his “Notebooks.”  We are sharing one of his thoughts here and wish you a great #wellnesswednesday

“Vitality and beauty are gifts of Nature for those who live according to its laws.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The One Where you Reconnect With Your Family

familyvacation, vacation, familybonding, familyadventures, shorttrip, longtrip

Summer is here and the kids are out of school.  It is the perfect time to spend quality family time together.

Studies have shown that a family vacation is one of the most beneficial ways you can spend time with your children.  A family vacation creates moments that children value and will long remember. For the most part, it can be used as time spent away from electronic distractions and helps both parents and children relax and recharge without daily stressors.

When you travel with your children, you are offering them new experiences that will cause heightened social, physical, cognitive and sensory interaction.  Visiting museums, national parks, swimming together in an ocean or pool, hiking through the forest, campfire chats or long rides in the car can be effective when seeking to strengthen the family bond.

A family vacation is also a good way to get your child to open up.  It is a time when chores don’t exist and rules are relaxed causing them to feel more open to discussing what’s going on in their lives.

Children, who travel with their family, learn how to interact with people from different backgrounds and cultures. Experiencing new places, foods, traditions and meeting new people increases a child’s confidence and builds interpersonal skills.

Whether it’s a short overnighter or a long adventure, a family vacation is something to be shared and has been proven to enrich the overall development of your child.  They return from the holiday happier and with knowledge of a world and cultures outside of their own way of living.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of the Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Chenfei Huang RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Chenfei:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I started working at Flushing September of 2015. Initially started on telemetry 3N2, and later transitioned to ICU

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: ICU: MICU, SICU, CCU

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  The increasing diversity of the population in the metro area. The need for nurses with cultural awareness and understanding of specific population groups. I have an appreciation for the complexity of medical conditions. Lastly,  patients are living longer, I want to ensure that our population will receive the very best healthcare for years to come.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The ability to advocate for patients. In ICU, many patients are so sick that they are unable to speak up. Nurses are the voice of the patients. The gratitude you receive from patients is priceless.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – William “Jasper” Jackson

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Employee Spotlight shines on William “Jasper” Jackson.  Jasper is the Program Administrator in the Department of Medicine.

As Program Administrator, for the past five and a half years, Jasper has the responsibility of assisting in the day-to-day workings of the department.  He assists with the planning, implementation and monitoring of various processes and systems, as well as providing general office suppoemployee spotlight flushing hospital medical centerrt for the faculty, residents and staff.

When not at work, Jasper enjoys hiking and spending time with his family.  Additionally, he is involved in his community.  He is currently a board member at his Co-op as well as the Shirley Chisholm Day Care Centers, Inc.

Jasper loves the work he does even though there can be challenges with ensuring compliance with departmental and institutional requirements.  “The most rewarding part of my job is the sense of accomplishment as projects and tasks are completed.  I also love my interactions with colleagues throughout our network.”

Congratulations William “Jasper” Jackson for being chosen as June’s Employee Spotlight!

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Advocates for Healthy Mothers and Newborns

breastfeeding program flushing queensThe Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS)  highlights the many ways its member hospitals and health systems are transforming healthcare with their “Innovation Spotlight” campaign. Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) is proud to have been highlighted as an “Innovator” in advocating for healthy mothers and newborns.

In 2015, the hospital began a community-based program, Breastfeeding and Beyond: Breastfeeding Education and Nutrition in the Community.  According to HANYS, “FHMC works with partners in the community — including the New York City Public Library and Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children — to improve health and promote the well-being of women, newborns, infants, toddlers and children.”

“Over the past three years,  Flushing Hospital’s exclusive breastfeeding rates increased from 6%  to 30%. More than 375 women with their children and families have been educated both prenatally and after birth. The intent to breastfeed upon admission to the hospital increased from 50% in 2015 to 96% in 2018 and upon discharge from the hospital it rose from 29% in 2015 to 88% in 2018.” stated Maria D. Smilios, Director, Nursing-Maternal and Child Services.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Caring For A Loved One With Mental Illness

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Clinical diagnosis for mental illness such as schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression can be difficult.  It is especially difficult when it is a loved one that is experiencing these conditions.

When a loved one has mental illness, family members can often feel emotions of embarrassment, anger, worry, self-blame or grief. Parents, specifically, can feel powerless over the disease and at a loss for what the best course of treatment for their child.

The focus becomes the person with mental illness, but studies have shown that it is just as important to maintain your own health while caring for a person with mental illness.

Some ways to maintain your health while being a caretaker are:

  • Maintain relationships with other family members
  • Seek professional support for yourself and your family
  • Participate in groups and family sessions with your loved one
  • Make time for yourself
  • Ask for help to lighten your responsibilities
  • Address one issue as a time to avoid burnout

As the caregiver, you are the tie that keeps everything together.  The more educated you are about the disease your loved one is facing and the time you set aside for yourself will be what helps you navigate the obstacles.

If your loved one has mental illness and you are seeking professional help as a caregiver, call the Mental Health Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5562 to schedule an appointment.

For more information for caring for a loved one with mental illness, visit American Phychological Association https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/serious-mental-illness.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Tongue Scraping Good For Your Oral Health?

tongue scraper, oral health, dental, oral care, bad breath, cavities, gum disease

In addition to brushing, many people are adding tongue scraping as a way to remove extra particles from the surface of the tongue. This technique is safely done with a small round tool usually made from plastic or metal that gently glides across the surface of the tongue removing any buildup of bacteria, dead cells and debris.

This buildup can cause:

  • Your sense of taste to lessen
  • A white coat to appear on top of your tongue
  • An increase in the likelihood of a stale odor (bad breath) to emanate from your mouth
  • An increased in the likelihood of cavities and gum disease.

By using a tongue scraper as part of your daily oral hygiene, many of these conditions can be eradicated.

Consistency in oral hygiene is the key to success.  If you institute a regimen of brushing and flossing your teeth, as well as scraping your tongue regularly, you may find that your overall oral health will improve.

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center please call 718-670-5521 to schedule an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

Flushing Hospital can diagnose memory loss

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month which gives us the chance to make the public aware of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease being very important health issues.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s have profound effects on many people. There are an estimated 5 million people with the disease and 15 million people who are caring for them. It is said to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

It has been said that Alzheimer’s is the only disease that can lead to death that cannot be slowed down, cured, or prevented. It acts by slowly killing brain cells which affects all of our ability to function normally.

Brain exercises may help mental functionality in areas of memory, focus, concentration and understanding.

Some suggested ways to keep our brains healthy are:

  • Getting enough sleep
  • Staying physically active
  • Eating properly
  • Not smoking
  • Challenging your mind with social interaction
  • Taking classes
  • Being aware of challenges that could lead to depression

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.