Enjoy A Healthy Springtime Recipe

Spring has arrived and what better way to celebrate than with a tasty, easy to prepare  meal made with creamy mushrooms, peas and chicken. Here is a delicious recipe from the Food Network for chicken, mushrooms and peas.  https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/chicken-with-creamy-mushrooms-and-snap-peas-recipe-1972982.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Parkinson’s Awareness Month

An older woman holding her hand in place due to tremors caused by Parkinson's disease.During Parkinson’s Awareness Month, healthcare organizations work to raise awareness about Parkinson’s disease, including symptoms, warning signs, and all current resources available to improve the quality of life experienced by people living with this condition.

Parkinson’s is a progressive disease of the nervous system that causes tremors and muscular rigidity; this, in turn, leads to slow and imprecise body movements. The disease is caused by the degeneration of the basal ganglia of the brain and a deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine, which controls many of the body’s movements.  Parkinson’s mostly affects people who are middle-aged or elderly.

Not all symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear immediately; some people can live with the disease for years or decades before non-motor symptoms begin to appear. Some specific signs and symptoms of Parkinson’s include:

  • Tremor: A tremor, or shaking, usually begins in a limb, often your hand or fingers.
  • Slowed movement: Over time, Parkinson’s disease may reduce your ability to move, making simple tasks difficult and time-consuming.
  • Rigid muscles: Muscle stiffness can occur in any part of your body. The stiff muscles can limit your range of motion and cause pain.
  • Impaired posture and balance: Your posture may become stooped, or you may have balance problems.
  • Loss of automatic movements: Parkinson’s disease can lead to a decreased ability to perform unconscious movements, including blinking, smiling, or swinging your arms when you walk.
  • Speech changes: You may speak softly or quickly, slur, or hesitate before talking. Your speech may be more monotone, rather than having normal inflections.
  • Writing changes: It may become hard to write and/or your writing may appear small.

Some symptoms, such as tremors, can be managed through certain medications. These medications can act as a substitute for dopamine, sending signals to your brain that function similarly to this neurotransmitter. Although these medications can become less effective over time, some patients experience significant improvement in their symptoms as a result of treatment.

Parkinson’s disease can be frightening and challenging to live with, but there are treatment options available to help you engage in your normal daily activities more easily. To learn more or to schedule an appointment with a neurologist, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips to Prevent Exercise Injuries

A runner holding their leg due to pain from an exercise-related injury.Exercise is generally good for your health; in fact, adults are recommended to get 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity and two days of muscle-strengthening activity each week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, it’s also important to keep in mind that there is always a risk of physical injury while exercising. Some of the most common exercise-related injuries include:

  • Injuries to your shoulders, knees, elbows, legs, or ankles
  • Bone fractures
  • Dislocation
  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Tendinitis
  • Bursitis

Several factors affect your risk of experiencing an injury while exercising. One of these is the exercise itself; certain exercises are more challenging than others and, as a result, may be more likely to cause an injury if you are not able to perform them properly. Another factor is frequency; a moderate amount of exercise is healthy, but working out excessively can put too much stress on your body. You may also be more likely to experience an injury if you have a medical condition or disability that makes an exercise more difficult to perform.

You can off-set these risk factors by taking certain steps to keep yourself safe. When you exercise, you should:

  • Learning the correct form for each exercise you plan to do
  • Warm up before performing an exercise (for example, by performing the exercise at a very light weight)
  • Cool down after performing an exercise (you can repeat your warm-up exercise or do a different, slow-paced activity for this)
  • Using safety equipment (talk to your doctor about what would be most appropriate for the exercises you plan to do)
  • Talking to your doctor about the types of exercises you plan to perform to make sure that they are safe for you
  • Varying your exercises throughout the week, focusing on different muscles each day you work out

It’s also important to recognize when you’re experiencing pain (as opposed to soreness) while working out. Sore muscles are normal, both during and after exercise, and you will need to push yourself to a reasonable extent. However, if you feel pain, stop exercising right away. Additionally, if you feel that you physically cannot finish an exercise, don’t try to force yourself to do so; this can lead to overuse injuries.

If you’ve injured yourself while exercising, you can receive a diagnosis and treatment from a physiatrist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Rehabilitation. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 670-5515.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Natural Ways to do Spring Cleaning

Springtime means spring cleaning. If you’re looking for an alternative to store bought cleaners, check out these low-cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly cleaning solutions for a fresh smelling home:

  • Baking Soda – cleans, softens water, and scours. You can also use baking soda to deodorize food storage containers and sprinkle on your carpet to absorb smells before vacuuming.
  • White Vinegar – cuts grease, removes mildew, odors, some stains and wax build-up. Use equal parts white vinegar and water to wash both the interior and exterior of your fridge.
  • Lemons  – effective against most household bacteria. Use lemon peels in your garbage disposal to help deodorize it.

You can also try these combinations:

  • All-Purpose Cleaner: Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/4 cup baking soda into 1/2 gallon (2 liters) water. Store and keep. Use for removal of water deposit stains on shower stall panels, bathroom chrome fixtures, windows, and bathroom mirrors.
  • Mold and Mildew cleaner: Use white vinegar or lemon juice full strength. Apply with a sponge or scrubby.
  • Window Cleaner: Mix 2 teaspoons of white vinegar with 1 liter warm water. Use crumpled newspaper or cotton cloth to clean. Only use the black and white newspapers, not the colored ones. Don’t clean windows if the sun is on them, or if they are warm, or streaks will show on drying.
  • Furniture Polish: For varnished wood, add a few drops of lemon oil into a 1/2 cup warm water. Mix well and spray onto a soft, slightly damp, cotton cloth.  Wipe furniture with the cloth, and finish by wiping once more using a dry soft cotton cloth.

One more tip: Whenever you clean your home, save the floor or carpet for last. Clean window blinds and shelves first and then work downwards.  This allows time for the dust to settle before vacuuming.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Our New Beginnings Team Member Yuna Lee, RN

This month we are proud to highlight Yuna Lee, RN, a nurse in our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

Yuna began her nursing career at Flushing Hospital Medical Center in 2014 and in our NICU  in 2015. Her passion for working with babies, especially pre-term babies, began when she was doing her clinical rotations in nursing school. One of the babies she worked with was born at 23 weeks, was on a ventilator  and weighed only 600 grams. It was at that point that her passion for taking care of fragile babies really blossomed.

The babies in the NICU are very delicate and fragile. It really takes a special type of person to care for them properly. Yuna’s main role is of course to take care of the babies, but she also has to comfort the parents of these babies because they very often need support.

Yuna feels very fortunate to be working with such a wonderful team in her unit. They have all become like a family to her. She also enjoys working at Flushing Hospital because it is her community and she is helping to make people’s lives better.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How a Plant-Based Diet Can Help Your Heart Health

Plant-based diets, which prioritize foods such as fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, and whole grains with only small, occasional servings of animal protein, are associated with a lower risk of heart disease at any age. However, not everyone may fully understand what a healthy, nutritious plant-based diet looks like.

A wide variety of foods can fall under the “plant-based” umbrella, with many options not necessarily providing significant benefits to your heart health. Some foods, such as white rice and white bread, are highly processed, meaning that you will not receive many of the necessary nutrients to promote better heart health from them. Other foods that are best avoided include those that are high in sugar, sodium, and extra additives.

A plant-based diet does not have to involve cutting out all meat. You can make beneficial changes for your heart health by keeping your overall meat consumption at a moderate level and by eating healthier types of meat. It is recommended that you stick to unprocessed red meat and poultry, as well as limit your meat portions to approximately three 3.5-ounce servings each week.

Fish can also be a healthy, beneficial element of a plant-based diet. Similarly, however, you should keep your intake at a moderate level, meaning that you should limit your fish consumption to two servings of approximately 3 ounces of fish per week. Fatty fish such as salmon, herring, and mackerel can be a particularly beneficial addition to your diet.

Remember that what you eat is not the only thing that matters when it comes to your heart health; you also need to monitor how much you eat and how physically active you are. Make sure to stay within the recommended number of calories for you to consume each day and to follow an exercise routine that incorporates strength and aerobic activities three days per week.

If you experience heart problems or may be at risk of heart disease, you can schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Cardiology Department by calling (718)-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Managing The Transition To Daylight Saving Time

Sunday, March 10th, 2024 marks the beginning of Daylight Saving Time (DST), and most people living in the United States will advance the time on their clocks by one hour.

The transition between standard time and DST causes many to lose one hour of sleep. Although one hour less of sleep may seem harmless, it has been found that the change in time can adversely affect our health.

The Sleep Foundation explains, “The transition between DST and Standard Time has darker mornings and more evening light. This can essentially “delay” your sleep-wake cycle.” This disruption in our sleep cycle or circadian rhythm can lead to problems such as insomnia, grogginess, problems concentrating, lower cognitive performance, and mood changes.

Fortunately, there are ways we can prepare our bodies for the change to DST and reduce the risk of these problems. Here are a few ways to manage the change:

  • Set your clocks ahead on Saturday evening and go to bed on time
  • Take afternoon naps following the days after DST
  • Get more light during the first days of the change
  • Limit the consumption of caffeinated or alcoholic beverages a few days before the change

Getting a good night’s rest is essential for your health. If you are having trouble falling asleep or getting a restful night’s sleep, you should speak with your doctor as there may be an underlying medical issue.

To schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Richard Calvo

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Richard Calvo, HVAC Mechanic in Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Engineering Department.

Richard has been at Flushing Hospital for eight years. He began his career at the hospital in the Housekeeping Department working the overnight shift cleaning the operating rooms. He then transferred to the Engineering Department, first as a grounds keeper and then on to the position he currently holds as an HVAC mechanic.

Richard grew up in Oceanside, Long Island where he attended elementary school through high school.  His family is very important to him and he enjoys spending his free time with them.  Richard has two cats and a dog in his home. In his free time he enjoys reading, especially studying about pressure boiler systems. His favorite TV programs are Japanese Anime. Richard also enjoys comedies and shows about the supernatural. His favorite foods are sushi and Italian food.  He listens to different types of music, especially rock, rap and alternative. He has traveled to Florida and hopes one day to visit Puerto Rico and Costa Rica. Richard’s favorite sports to participate in and to watch are MMA, boxing and swimming.

Richard enjoys working in the Engineering Department at Flushing Hospital because his coworkers have become like family to him. It is a wonderful place to grow and learn. We look forward to Richard continuing to work with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Health Conditions Caused by Obesity

Obesity is defined as a chronic condition that is  measured as a numerical value of a person’s body mass index (BMI) in proportion to their height. BMI indicates how much fat a body has.  The ideal BMI for an adult is between 20kg/m2 and 24.9kg/m2. A person whose BMI exceeds 30kg/m2 is considered to be obese , and when that number is greater than 40kg/m2  they are considered to be morbidly obese.

It is estimated that more than 40 percent of people in the United States can be considered obese.

Some of the health conditions they may develop as a result of obesity include:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Elevated cholesterol
  • Fatty liver disease
  • Gout
  • High blood pressure
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Kidney disease
  • Infertility
  • Sleep apnea
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Psychosocial issues
  • Sexual function issues
  • Stroke
  • Breathing problems

A person who is moderately obese can lower their BMI by weight loss and through exercise. In some cases this may not be sufficient and may require medical or surgical intervention.  Flushing Hospital offers a comprehensive approach to weight loss. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician who can help with your weight loss goals, please call 718-670-8908 0r 718-408-6977.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Syphilis Cases Are Rising – Here’s What You Need to Know

A doctor talking to a patient while writing notes.Syphilis cases throughout the United States have surged dramatically over the past five years, increasing by nearly 79% according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The uptick in cases of congenital syphilis is even more staggering, with an increase of 183.4% from 2018 to 2022. As this epidemic worsens, it’s important to have the facts about syphilis and learn more about what you can do to keep yourself and others safe.

Syphilis is a type of sexually-transmitted infection (STI), meaning that it is spread through sexual contact with other people. It is transmitted through direct skin-to-skin contact with a syphilis sore on another person’s body, but can also spread through casual contact with objects that a person with syphilis may have used, such as toilet seats, door knobs, clothing, or eating utensils. You can also become infected through using shared spaces such as bathtubs or swimming pools.

In its primary stage, syphilis causes firm, round, and painless sores around the site where the infection entered your body. Even if these sores go away without treatment, the disease may enter its secondary stage, which can cause rashes and other symptoms, such as:

  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph glands
  • Sore throat
  • Patchy hair loss
  • Headaches
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Muscle aches
  • Fatigue

The latent stage of syphilis, which follows the secondary phase, does not present new symptoms. However, it can progress into the tertiary stage, during which the disease can cause damage to organs such as the heart, brain, blood vessels, and eyes. Without treatment, syphilis that enters the tertiary stage can result in death.

Congenital syphilis can occur when a mother with syphilis transmits the infection to her baby. This type of syphilis can cause severe health complications for an affected baby, including:

  • Bone deformities
  • Severe anemia
  • Enlarged liver and spleen
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • Nervous system problems, such as blindness or deafness
  • Meningitis
  • Skin rashes
  • Death

You should get tested for syphilis if you are:

  • Sexually active, especially if you do not use condoms
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • Have HIV
  • Are taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention
  • Have previously had (or currently have) sexual contact with partners who have tested positive for syphilis

You can receive diagnostic testing and treatment for syphilis at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.