Tardive Dyskinesia

The National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) defines tardive dyskinesia (TD) as, “a movement disorder that causes a range of repetitive muscle movements in the face, neck, arms and legs.”

TD often develops as a side effect of long-term use of certain medications (most commonly antipsychotic medications used to treat schizophrenia and other mental health disorders). Tardive dyskinesia may also develop as a result of prolonged use of medications used to treat nausea and neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.

The symptoms of TD are beyond a person’s control and can affect their quality of life.  Symptoms may include uncontrolled:

  • Jerky movements of the face
  • Neck twisting
  • Smacking or puckering the lips
  • Tongue movements
  • Chewing
  • Frowning
  • Eye blinking
  • Hand and leg movements

Some people are more likely to develop TD than others. You may have a higher risk if you:

  • Are born female at birth
  • Misuse drugs or alcohol
  • Are Asian American or African American
  • Are of the age of 55
  • Have gone through menopause
  • Have a family history of TD

If you are experiencing symptoms of tardive dyskinesia, your healthcare provider may run a series of tests to rule out other movement disorders.

Treatment for TD involves monitoring medications and making adjustments when needed. In some cases, your physician may recommend that you stop taking certain medications. If symptoms persist, other treatments such as botulinum toxin injections, deep brain stimulation, or medications used to treat movement disorders may help.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is National Family Caregivers Month

November is National Family Caregivers Month.  The observance was created by the Caregiver Action Network as an initiative to honor family caregivers across the United States.

Taking care of a loved one with a serious illness can be physically and mentally challenging. Many family caregivers often experience sleep deprivation, poor eating habits, stress, anxiety or depression; all of which can take a toll on their health.

As a family caregiver, it is important to keep in mind that taking care of your own health is equally as important as caring for the health of loved ones.   You need to be at your best in order to take good care of others.

Here are a few tips to help you take care of yourself while caring for loved ones:

  • Recognize when you are stressed-Paying attention to early signs of stress can you help to identify stressors and put a plan into action to diminish or reduce their effects.
  • Make time for yourself- It is important to take breaks to avoid burnout and help you re-energize.
  • Take care of your health-Neglecting your health can lead to medical complications. It is important that you eat healthy, exercise and keep up with routine doctor visits.
  • Ask for help- Caring for a loved one can be overwhelming; feeling alone and overwhelmed can lead to depression or anxiety. It is important that you do not isolate yourself and seek the support of a group or individual that can help you navigate challenges.

Being a caregiver often requires a 24/7 commitment. While this level of dedication can be difficult, there are many resources available to alleviate some of the challenges.  The Caregiver Action Network provides helpful tools to help you overcome obstacles you may encounter. Please visit caregiveraction.org for more information.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Delicious Recipe for Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls

Big orange pumpkins are most frequently associated with the Fall season. They can be decorated for display purposes and they can also be used in many recipes. Here is a recipe from The Pioneer Woman magazine for pumpkin spice cinnamon rolls that you will definitely enjoy.  https://www.thepioneerwoman.com/food-cooking/recipes/a11247/pumpkin-cinnamon-rolls/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Anti-Itch Ingredients to Look for (and Avoid) for Eczema

Eczema is a common skin condition characterized by patches of itchy, dry, blistering skin. It affects approximately 31 million Americans and up to 20% of all infants. The symptoms of eczema can range from mild to severe, often occurring in periodic “flare-ups” that cause them to temporarily worsen before subsiding.

While effective treatments for eczema such as steroid injections, oral medications, and even light therapy are available, many cases are treated through over-the-counter topical skin care products such as lotions, moisturizers, antihistamines, pain relievers, topical hydrocortisone, and shampoo.

These types of products can help prevent flare-ups of eczema by hydrating the affected areas of your skin and reducing inflammation. They often include ingredients such as:

  • Aloe
  • Glycerin
  • Hyaluronic acid
  • Vitamin E
  • Petrolatum
  • Humectants
  • Niacinamide

However, not all lotions, moisturizers, fragrances, or other skin care products may be beneficial for eczema-affected skin, as certain common ingredients can cause or worsen flare-ups, even if they’re beneficial for other types of skin conditions. These include:

  • Ethanol and alcohol
  • Lanolin
  • Propylene glycol
  • Retinoids
  • Essential oils
  • Urea

If you’re suffering from eczema, it’s best to work with a dermatologist that can help you find the most effective treatment options for your condition. You can schedule an appointment with a dermatologist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center now by calling (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

In 1983, President Ronald Reagan designated the month of November as National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month. This designation serves to bring awareness of the disease to the general public.

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive brain disorder that is not a normal part of aging. At the current time, more than six million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s and it is estimated that by the year 2060 this number is estimated to exceed 14 million people. There is no cure for the disease but there are treatments being studied.

If you think that you or a person you know may be experiencing memory loss that could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, speak to your physician about a screening exam. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are Doctors Checking for During a Physical Exam ?

During a physical examination, doctors inspect different parts of our bodies to check for symptoms or potential health problems.  They may peer inside our ears, shine a light in our eyes, and look inside our mouths for tell-tale signs, here are some of the medical reasons why they do so:

  • Shining a light in your eyes- Our eyes can reveal a great deal about our health. Doctors shine a light in our eyes to evaluate how well our pupils respond. In healthy eyes, the pupils will shrink and maintain their round shape. Doctors may also look at the color of your eyes during an examination. Red eyes mays signal irritation and yellow eyes can serve as a warning sign for liver problems.
  • Peering into your ears – By using an otoscope, doctors can check for signs of infection. Some otoscopes can send a puff of air into the ear canal, this helps doctors to see your eardrum and how it moves when there is pressure in your ear canal.
  • Pressing your stomach-Doing so can help doctors determine if the size of your internal organs is normal. Additionally, your doctor may check for pain, tenderness, or firmness. Doctors may also listen to your stomach with a stethoscope to check for bowel problems.
  • Looking into your mouth- Our mouths can also tell us a lot about our health. Doctors look at the back of our throats to see if there are any infections. They also look at the color and texture of our tongues which can be indicative of infections or other underlying medical conditions.
  • Listening to your heart or lungs – By using a stethoscope, your doctor may listen to your heart to check for heart murmurs, irregular rhythms, or signs of congestive heart failure. Doctors listen to your lungs to check for wheezing, fluid build-up, or infections.

Getting an annual physical is very important for your health.  A physical examination can help your doctor to detect problems that can pose a serious threat to your overall wellness.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hyperglycemia

The American Diabetes Association defines hyperglycemia as the technical term for having high blood glucose or high blood sugar.

High blood sugar can occur in people with diabetes as a result of eating certain foods, skipping, or not taking the correct dosage of insulin.  Other causes are taking certain medications, infections, or severe illnesses.

Symptoms of hyperglycemia do not present immediately in most cases. They typically develop slowly, over several days or weeks.  According to the Mayo Clinic, hyperglycemia usually doesn’t cause symptoms until blood sugar (glucose) levels are high — above 180 to 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 10 to 11.1 millimoles per liter (mmol/L).

Symptoms of hyperglycemia can include:

  • Increased thirst
  • Dry mouth
  • Fruity-smelling breath
  • Frequent urination
  • Blurred vision

It is important to pay attention to symptoms because hyperglycemia can become a serious health problem if left untreated. Ongoing high blood sugar levels can lead to nerve damage as well as damage to blood vessels and organs. Potentially life-threatening complications such as ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could also occur.

If you are experiencing symptoms of hyperglycemia, consult your physician right away. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spiced Applesauce Bread

Fall has arrived and we would like to share a recipe from allrecipes using applesauce as one of the ingredients. It is easy to make and everyone will enjoy it. https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/17683/spiced-applesauce-bread/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

3 Dangerous Social Media Health Trends to Avoid

Popular social media sites such as Instagram and TikTok often give rise to a variety of health and wellness trends. However, many of these trends offer questionable medical benefits and, in some cases, can lead to harmful consequences. Three recent examples of these trends include dry scooping, sunscreen contouring, and cooking chicken in NyQuil.

Dry scooping involves eating pre-workout powders with high volumes of ingredients such as caffeine, creatine, and beta-alanine without mixing them into a liquid. This practice has gained traction over the past year among online fitness communities and influencers, as it’s believed to increase the body’s absorption of the compounds in a powder and allow a person to exercise at increased intensity.

You may, however, find yourself unable to swallow the powder due to its texture and accidentally inhale it, causing inflammation in your throat and nasal passages as well as potentially infecting your lungs. Additionally, this method of ingesting the powder introduces a large amount of caffeine into your body more quickly than drinking it in liquid form, increasing your risk of heart problems. Dry scooping also increases your risk of suffering from digestive issues.

Sunscreen contouring is another dangerous trend that’s emerged through social media this year. It involves applying sunscreen to the high points of your face and staying in the sun to allow tan lines to form and produce a contoured effect.

The primary danger of this trend is that it significantly increases your risk of receiving sunburrns and developing skin cancer. Cumulative ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun over time can cause basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers to form. Sunburns, particularly severe ones that cause blistering, can also become melanoma later in life.

NyQuil chicken recently re-emerged as a TikTok trend after first appearing several years ago on the popular website Reddit. It involves cooking chicken in the cold medicine NyQuil.

As the chicken is cooked and the NyQuil boils in the pan, certain compounds evaporate, leaving behind a concentrated amount of other ingredients that may cause toxic side-effects such as seizures, liver disease, and even death.

Avoid these trends and do what you can to prevent family members and friends, particularly young people who may be more vulnerable to them, from attempting them.

If you experience immediate adverse effects from these practices, dial 9-1-1 and get help immediately. If you’re concerned about cumulative effects from these trends, please schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Happens During a Skin Cancer Screening?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and approximately one in five Americans will develop skin cancer during their lifetime. Rates of skin cancers have also risen sharply over the past several decades. However, you can give yourself the best chance of an early diagnosis and successful treatment through a skin cancer screening.

Over 9,500 cases of skin cancer are diagnosed every day through physical screenings. If a form of skin cancer such as melanoma is caught early, the five-year survival rate is 99%, making successful treatment extremely likely.  This rate may fall dramatically as the disease progresses, however, reaching 68% when it reaches the lymph nodes and 30% once it metastasizes to other organs.

In many cases, symptoms of skin cancer may occur in seemingly normal skin, with only a low percentage developing from existing moles. In other cases, symptoms may not present at all. This can make it difficult for you to spot signs of skin cancer on your own, and even more important to get screened by a dermatologist on a regular basis.

During a skin cancer screening, a dermatologist fully examines your skin from head to toe, checking for lesions or areas that appear abnormal. Irregular borders, multiple colors, and a size greater than six millimeters in diameter are a few of the indicators your doctor may look for, though these factors alone may not provide a sufficient basis for a diagnosis.

Your doctor may request a skin sample for a biopsy during your screening to examine certain skin cells more closely. Once your test results arrive, your doctor can provide a more definitive diagnosis.

It’s recommended that you get screened for skin cancer annually, or potentially more often if you’re at a high risk of developing it. You should also regularly check your own skin and take note of any marks or spots that appear different from their surrounding areas or cause sensations such as itching or pain. These spots should be pointed out to your doctor during a screening.

You can get a skin cancer screening at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center. To schedule an appointment, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.