Flushing Hospital Receives Healthgrades 2019 Women’s Care Excellence Awards

Healthgrades, a leading online resource for information about physicians and hospitals, recently revealed its list of recipients for their 2019 Women’s Care Excellence Awards – and Flushing Hospital Medical Center is among the privileged and few recipients.

These awards recognize hospitals across the nation that demonstrate exceptional outcomes and excel in women’s healthcare services. The awards were broken down into three separate categories, including:

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology Excellence Award – This award highlights hospitals for exceptional clinical outcomes while caring for women in childbirth, as well as during and after gynecologic surgeries and procedures.
  • Labor and Delivery Excellence Award – This distinction recognizes the top 10 % of all hospitals evaluated for the exceptional care provided to mothers during and after labor and delivery.
  • Gynecologic Surgery Excellence Award – This award recognizes the top 10% of hospitals evaluated that provided outstanding performance in gynecologic surgery, including hysterectomy and surgery related to the female reproductive system.

Flushing Hospital received all three awards and was the only hospital in Queens to receive the Gynecologic Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology Excellence awards.

According to Maria Smilios, Director of Nursing, “Flushing Hospital has done many things that have contributed to earning these awards, including creating standards to prevent inducing labor before 39 weeks gestation to reduce the chances of complications at birth.” Maria added that “providing our patients with continuity of care throughout their pregnancy and stressing the importance of maintaining proper prenatal care have also been major factors in our success.”  Other reasons to cite the hospital receiving these accolades include having dedicated gynecologists and gyn specialists on staff, as well as the addition of the daVinci robotic surgical system,  which has improved gynecological surgical outcomes for Flushing Hospital patients.

Approximately 3,000 babies are delivered at Flushing Hospital every year. The gynecology division performed over 1,500 procedures in 2018 and the hospital’s Women’s Health Center had nearly 14,000 outpatient visits last year.

“We are honored to receive these awards” stated Dr. Hajoon Chun, Chairman of Ob/Gyn at Flushing Hospital Medical Center. “It signifies the hospital’s dedication to providing the highest quality care to women in our community and is another example of why Flushing Hospital is the hospital of choice for so many seeking obstetrical and gynecological care.”

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why is a Vitamin K Deficiency Dangerous ?

Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin that is responsible for the production of the components needed for blood clotting. It also may play a role in bone production. Without sufficient vitamin K we would potentially bleed too much.

There are two types of vitamin K: K1 which comes from leafy greens,  spinach, asparagus, broccoli, green beans and some other vegetables and K2 which comes from meats, cheeses, and eggs.

People who are at risk of vitamin K deficiency include those :

  • Taking certain antibiotics
  • Taking blood thinners including Coumadin
  • Having poor absorption by the intestines due to celiac disease
  • Having a diet poor in vitamin K
  • Drinking large amounts of alcohol frequently

Vitamin K does not transfer well with breast milk and for this reason many infants are given an injection of vitamin K at birth to help them get the necessary amount that the body requires.

To determine if a person has an adequate amount in the body, a prothrombin test is performed to check blood clotting time.

If you are experiencing blood clotting issues, you should speak to your physician about the possible causes. You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs Your Child May Be A Victim of Bullying

Signs of  BullyingMany children will not tell parents they are being bullied until the situation escalates, but there a few changes in their behavior that can alert you.

Signs that your child may be a victim of bullying include refusing to speak about their day at school, not wanting to go to school, unexplained marks and bruises, asking for more lunch money, complaining of frequent headaches and stomach aches, sudden loss of friends and frequent nightmares.

Bullying has profound effects on children. For some, it affects them for life. Psychological responses can range from depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder to severe reactive rage leading to the victim being the perpetrator of cruelty to others. In some instances, children have responded to bullying and cyber-bullying by committing suicide.

If you find that your child is being bullied, you will need to document the dates, times and places of the action. If the bullying is taking place on school grounds, call the school and schedule a face to face meeting with a teacher or principal. If not on school grounds, notify the police.

Most schools have adopted an anti-bullying policy. Obtain a copy to determine if the bully violated school law. Bullying is best handled when you work together, with the proper authorities.

After notification, be sure to follow up with your child, and the school, to make sure that the bullying has stopped.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pulmonary Fibrosis

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According to the Mayo Clinic, pulmonary fibrosis is a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes thickened, damaged and scarred. This thickened, stiff tissue makes it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As pulmonary fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath.

 

 

Some symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis are:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Dry cough
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Aching muscles and joints
  • Widening and rounding of the tips of the fingers or toes

Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by certain medical conditions, radiation therapy impurities and contaminants such as:

  • Silica dust
  • Asbestos fibers
  • Hard metal dusts
  • Coal dust
  • Grain dust
  • Bird and animal droppings

Unfortunately, pulmonary fibrosis cannot be cured.  There are medications that can help ease symptoms.  In severe cases, a lung transplant may be suggested.

 

If you have the symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis and would like to schedule an appointment with a Pulmonologist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5639

For this and additional information regarding pulmonary fibrosis visit – https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pulmonary-fibrosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20353690

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Helen Santos, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Helen:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working at Flushing Hospital since 1993.

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Currently, I work in the Emergency Department but I used to work in ICU.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  Being a nurse is a family tradition. It is an occupation in which I take great pride.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  I love my job!  What I enjoy most is interacting with my patients and helping them through what can be a frightening time.  I work hard to make them feel comfortable.  I want them to know they are well cared for.  I am grateful that I am part of a team that feels the same way I do.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Athlete’s Foot ?

Athlete’s Foot, also called tinea pedis, is a fungal infection of the foot. This It is a type of fungus that thrives in an environment that is warm, dark, and moist, similar to the inside of a shoe. It is commonly seen in athletes who walk barefoot in locker rooms but it can affect anyone. Even though it isn’t a serious disease, it can be quite uncomfortable and can be difficult to cure.

Athlete’s foot is spread by coming into direct contact with someone who already has it (wearing shoes or socks of an infected person), or indirectly (by walking on surfaces in a locker room, around a pool, or in a shower where someone with the infection has been).

Symptoms of athlete’s foot include:

  • Blisters on the feet that itch
  • Burning, itching, and stinging in the areas between the toes or on the soles of the feet
  • Discolored toe nails
  • Raw skin on the bottom of the feet
  • Peeling skin on the bottom of the feet
  • Having bad foot odor

Prevention of athlete’s foot is very important, especially if using public locker rooms or showers. Some of the methods of prevention include:

  • Wearing water slippers in public showers and locker rooms
  • Never walking barefoot
  • Never wearing someone else’s shoes, socks, or towels
  • Changing socks frequently especially if you sweat a lot
  • Using antifungal powder every day
  • Washing your feet with soap and water every day and drying them well, especially between the toes
  • Disinfecting the inside of your shoes with disinfectant wipes
  • Never wearing shoes that are damp on the inside

Athlete’s foot is diagnosed by taking a skin scraping form the infected area and placing it in a solution of potassium hydroxide. It is then examined under a microscope. If the sample is positive the normal cells will have dissolved and the infected cells will remain.

Treatment of athlete’s foot requires medication which can either be a topical over the counter medication or a stronger topical agent that will be prescribed by a physician. Sometimes an oral medication may be necessary if the infection is very serious.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of athlete’s foot you should seek medical care right away. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a foot doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

August Employee Spotlight – Michael Saavedra

August’s Employee Spotlight shines on Michael A. Saavedra, Lead Material Handler at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Michael has been a valued employee at FHMC for the past 32 years.  First, as a Material Handler and currently as Lead Material Handler, Michael supervises the day to day operations of the store room and receiving.

Michael Saavedra attended New York University, is a motor cycle enthusiast, and through the motorcycle community, raises money for various charitable organizations.

“Working with my great team and supply chain makes my job so much easier.” stated Michael.  “I make it my duty to ensure that all departments are accommodated with the items to help them better serve the patients and the hospital.”

He prides himself on making sure that the inventories are at optimal stock, continually checks expiration dates and cycles out any expired items from being brought to the departments he serves.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center congratulates Michael A. Saavedra for receiving August’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Is Water Good For Your Health?

wellnesswednesday, drinkwater, dehydration, hydrate

 

 

 

Drinking water is often touted as a way to clear the body’s system of unnecessary waste, but it actually has many more benefits.

Studies show that water can:

  1. Lubricate the joints of the body
  2. Help form saliva and mucous
  3. Deliver oxygen throughout the body
  4. Boost skin health and beauty
  5. Cushion the brain, spinal cord and other sensitive tissues
  6. Regulate body temperature
  7. Aid the digestive track
  8. Help maintain blood pressure
  9. Help keep  airways open
  10. Makes minerals and nutrients accessible throughout the body
  11. Prevent kidney damage
  12. Boost performance during exercise
  13. Promote weight loss
  14. Helps prevent hangover

According to the Mayo Clinic, an adequate daily fluid intake is about 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids for men and about 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids for women.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Traveling With Medication

Tips for traveling with medication Preparing for a flight often requires careful planning and packing. When traveling with medication, knowing airport rules ahead of time can help you to pack correctly and minimize setbacks on your trip.

It is important that you follow these tips provided by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to avoid delays in your travel time or confiscation of your medication:

  • Confirm that your prescription is legal at your destination; some medications that are allowed in the United States are prohibited in other countries.
  • Learn state requirements for the labeling of prescription medication. States have individual laws of which travelers must comply.
  • You can bring unlimited amounts of your medication in pill or solid form, as long as it is screened. Medications are typically screened by X-ray; however, if you do want them X-rayed you may ask to have them inspected instead. This request must be made before your medication enters the X-ray tunnel.
  • You are allowed to bring liquid medication in carry-on bags in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities.
  • If traveling with liquid medication, you must inform the inspecting officer at the start of the screening checkpoint process. Additional screening will be required and you may be asked to open the container.
  • Supplies associated with medication such as syringes, pumps, IV bags or needles must undergo screening.

Packing appropriately for your trip can make traveling with medication less complicated. It is highly recommended that you check the TSA’s website, www.tsa.gov, for updates as the current rules can change.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do You Ever Have Sweaty Palms ?

Having your palms sweat as a nervous response to a stressful situation is something that most people have experienced at some point in their lives, but for some, sweaty palms (or palmar hyperhidrosis), is a chronic condition that can cause great embarrassment and interfere with their day to day existence.

Palmer hyperhidrosis affects approximately 1 and 3 percent of Americans, but researchers believe that this number is low because many are unaware that it is a medical condition and never report it to their doctor.

This condition is part of a family of disorders called primary focal hyperhidrosis, which can affect other parts of the body including the armpits, scalp and feet. These conditions are usually not caused by an underlying medical issue and are unlike secondary hyperhidrosis, which is characterized by excessive sweating that isn’t isolated to one area of the body and is usually the result of another medical problem.

While the exact cause of palmer hyperhidrosis is still unknown, many believe there is a genetic predisposition as many who have it also report a family history of the condition.

There are many treatment options for palmer hyperhidrosis, including:

  • Topical aluminum chloride – One of the most common treatments for palmer hyperhidrosis. This solution is applied to the palms nightly until the condition improves and then used as needed.
  • Botox injections – This has proven to be an effective treatment for many forms of localized sweating, including the palms. The treatment is FDA approved, but it can result in temporary weakness in the hands.
  • Iontophoresis – A treatment that involves placing your hands in a shallow bath of water that contains a mild electrical current. This medical device can cost over $500 and may not be covered by all insurers.
  • Medications – Oral prescriptions called anticholinergics are sometimes prescribed if other treatment options aren’t successful, but these medications sometimes cause uncomfortable side effects.
  • Surgery – If all other measures fail, there are procedures where a surgeon can go into the chest and clip the nerves that are responsible for producing sweat. This can be a permanent solution, but only used in extreme cases.

Speak to your doctor about what type of treatment option is best for you. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.