Which Drug-Free Dieting Strategy is Right for You?

Rapid weight loss, though not typically recommended as a healthy method of slimming down and keeping weight off, is sometimes necessary for severely obese people. In many cases, this kind of weight loss is overseen by a doctor and aided by prescription medications such as Ozempic, a drug primarily intended to treat diabetes.

However, recent shortages in this drug and others that are typically used to medically assist rapid weight loss may restrict availability for people trying to reach a healthy weight, making it necessary to consider other potential options.

Two particular dieting strategies, with the assistance of a doctor, can offer a safe means of rapidly losing weight when necessary and preserving your health. These include:

Intermittent Fasting: This strategy involves alternating between eating on a regular schedule and severely restricting calories. One popular example, the 16:8 approach, involves eating within an eight-hour window each day and fasting for the remaining 16. Another, the 5:2 approach, involves eating only one 500-600 calorie meal for two days of the week, eating normally for the remaining five days.

Low-Calorie Dieting: A low-calorie diet involves restricting daily calories to between 1000-1200 for women and 1200-1600 for men. An even stricter version of this approach can restrict calories to as little as 800 per day and is often used before weight loss surgery and can result in as much five pounds of weight loss per week.

Consult your doctor to determine whether these approaches are safe for you. They should be performed in conjunction with a regular exercise routine and a healthy, balanced diet. If you’re considering including herbal remedies or other types of supplements into your diet, talk to your doctor to determine whether these may cause complications with any foods you typically eat or medications you take.

If diet and exercise aren’t enough to help you adequately lose weight, other options are also available. Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a non-invasive FDA-approved weight loss procedure that can help patients who are not candidates for bariatric surgery. For more information, please call (718) 670-8909. If you are a candidate for bariatric surgery, you can receive more information by calling (718) 670-6977.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What are Shin Splints?

Dancers, runners, and other athletes are at a heightened risk for a variety of different physical injuries and conditions affecting the feet and legs. Shin splints (also known as medial tibial stress syndrome) are a particularly common type of athletic injury, though anyone can get them.

People with shin splints typically experience soreness, tenderness, pain, and swelling along the inner side of the shin bone and lower leg. Rest, ice, and over-the-counter pain medication are often enough to treat shin splints, but if left untreated, they may lead to a stress fracture.

Although you’re likely to experience shin splints at some point as an athlete, there are several steps you can take to reduce your risk or the severity of your injury. These include:

Exercising in moderation: Shin splints are strongly tied to excessive workouts involving running or other high-impact activities. Work out at a consistent, moderate intensity to allow your muscles, joints, and bones time to recover.

Using supportive footwear: Shoes, arch supports, and insoles also play a significant role in preventing injuries to your feet and legs. You should periodically replace the shoes you wear while exercising, use arch supports to manage shin splint pain, and use shock-absorbing insoles.

Include lower-impact activities in your workout: You can reduce your risk of sustaining shin splints by adding less intense activities, such as walking or biking, to your workout. Strength training can also help your feet and legs withstand the effects of high-impact exercises.

Ease into changes in your workout routine: Shin splints often occur in athletes that have made sudden changes to their workouts. You can reduce your risk by making more gradual changes to your routine.

If you start to experience pain in your lower legs that may indicate shin splints, you can schedule an appointment with a podiatrist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Thanksgiving Food Safety Tips

An important part of making happy memories with your family this Thanksgiving is avoiding risks such as food poisoning that may commonly occur at this time of year.

One in six people throughout the United States becomes sick from food poisoning annually. Common Thanksgiving staples such as turkey, beef, and gravy can transmit contaminants such as salmonella and clostridium perfringens, leading to a variety of potential symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever.

Contamination can occur before your purchase, during food prep, or at any other point up until dinner is eaten, meaning that preventing foodborne illness will require effort from your whole family in a few different ways.

During food prep, you should:

  • Store frozen turkey at zero degrees Fahrenheit or below until it’s ready to thaw.
  • Thaw your turkey safely in the refrigerator, microwave, or cold water.
  • Wash your hands before and after preparing your turkey.
  • Keep produce or other foods on separate plates and cutting boards from raw turkey.
  • Thoroughly wash all items used to handle raw turkey before using them for other items.
  • Cook all food thoroughly at a safe temperature.
  • Use a meat thermometer on the innermost part of your turkey’s wing and thigh and the thickest area of its breast to ensure that it’s cooked fully to 165 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Store leftovers at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower within two hours of cooking them.
  • Eat leftovers within four days of cooking them.

If you’re enjoying Thanksgiving dinner as a guest this year, you should:

  • Wash your hands frequently throughout the day, especially before touching food.
  • Point out or avoid eating any food that seems undercooked.
  • Keep unfinished food in your host’s refrigerator until you’re ready to return home.

If you experience symptoms of foodborne illness that aren’t going away, you can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 670-5486. If you experience severe symptoms such as bloody vomit or diarrhea, extreme stomach pain, or blurry vision, dial 911 or get to an emergency room immediately.

Happy a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tardive Dyskinesia

The National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) defines tardive dyskinesia (TD) as, “a movement disorder that causes a range of repetitive muscle movements in the face, neck, arms and legs.”

TD often develops as a side effect of long-term use of certain medications (most commonly antipsychotic medications used to treat schizophrenia and other mental health disorders). Tardive dyskinesia may also develop as a result of prolonged use of medications used to treat nausea and neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.

The symptoms of TD are beyond a person’s control and can affect their quality of life.  Symptoms may include uncontrolled:

  • Jerky movements of the face
  • Neck twisting
  • Smacking or puckering the lips
  • Tongue movements
  • Chewing
  • Frowning
  • Eye blinking
  • Hand and leg movements

Some people are more likely to develop TD than others. You may have a higher risk if you:

  • Are born female at birth
  • Misuse drugs or alcohol
  • Are Asian American or African American
  • Are of the age of 55
  • Have gone through menopause
  • Have a family history of TD

If you are experiencing symptoms of tardive dyskinesia, your healthcare provider may run a series of tests to rule out other movement disorders.

Treatment for TD involves monitoring medications and making adjustments when needed. In some cases, your physician may recommend that you stop taking certain medications. If symptoms persist, other treatments such as botulinum toxin injections, deep brain stimulation, or medications used to treat movement disorders may help.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COPD Awareness Month

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung condition that affects at least 12 million Americans and is one of the leading causes of disability and death. This condition causes the body’s airways to become obstructed through the over-production of mucus, which is itself caused by inflammation of the bronchial tubes that transport air to and from the lungs.

The symptoms of COPD worsen over time, progressing from coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath to weight loss and an increasing lack of energy and oxygen. Your lungs lose the elasticity they rely on to force air out of the body, preventing sufficient air from leaving the lungs when you exhale.

COPD has a few clear causes, including:

  • Certain chronic conditions affecting the body’s airways, such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis.
  • A genetic disorder that causes a deficiency of the protein alpha-1-antitrypsin, which helps to protect the lungs.

The most common cause of COPD, by far, is smoking. Long-term exposure to cigarette smoke and similar irritants inflame the body’s airways and contribute to the development of a chronic cough. Therefore, the best way for most people to reduce their risk of developing COPD is to quit smoking or avoid environmental exposure to smoke as much as possible.

You can take meaningful steps toward quitting smoking by:

  • Setting a date to quit.
  • Letting family, friends, and co-workers know that you’re quitting.
  • Making a plan for navigating challenges such as cravings and withdrawal.
  • Removing cigarettes and tobacco products from your environment.
  • Working with a doctor.

You can get help to quit smoking through Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s smoking cessation program, Freedom from Smoking, which you can contact at (718) 206-8494 to receive more information. If you need medical attention for symptoms of COPD, schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist at our Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 670-5486.

If you or a loved one experiences a COPD-related emergency such as severely-blue lips or fingernail beds, a rapid heartbeat, significant trouble catching a breath, or severe mental fogginess, dial 911 immediately.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

10 Foods That Can Help Lower High Blood Pressure

Hypertension (high blood pressure) develops when the force of the blood pushing against the arteries or flowing through the blood vessels is consistently too high.  This can lead to complications such as stroke, heart failure, kidney disease or heart attack.

Hypertension is treatable and manageable through medication and making certain lifestyle changes. One of the most effective lifestyle changes a person living with hypertension can apply is following a healthy diet rich in the following foods:

  1. Salmon and other types of fatty fish
  2. Green, leafy vegetables such as spinach and broccoli
  3. Citrus fruits
  4. Oatmeal
  5. Beets
  6. Berries
  7. Low-fat yogurt
  8. Seeds such as pumpkin, flax, and sunflower seeds
  9. Garlic
  10. Legumes and beans

Adding these foods to a diet can help with managing high blood pressure when combined with exercise and a treatment plan recommended by a doctor.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month. During this time, Flushing Hospital Medical Center is raising awareness of pancreatic cancer by sharing important facts about the disease.

The pancreas is an organ located in the abdomen. It plays an essential role in digestion by producing enzymes that break down food. The pancreas also produces hormones such as insulin that help the body regulate blood sugar.

Several types of cancerous growths can occur in the pancreas, this includes pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the most common type of pancreatic cancer, accounting for 95% of cases. Squamous cell carcinomas, adenosquamous carcinomas, and signet ring cell carcinomas are some of the less common types of pancreatic cancer.

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma develops when the exocrine cells in the pancreas begin to grow out of control and form a tumor. There is no clear answer as to what causes adenocarcinoma; however, some people have a greater risk than others of developing the disease.  This includes those who:

  • Smoke or use tobacco products
  • Are exposed to chemicals used in metal working or dry-cleaning industries
  • Are obese
  • Are born male
  • Are over the age of 60
  • Are of African American descent
  • Are of Ashkenazi Jewish descent
  • Have inherited certain gene mutations
  • Have diabetes
  • Have chronic pancreatitis

According to the American Cancer Society, pancreatic cancer is hard to find early. This is because symptoms typically do not present until after cancer has progressed (spreading outside the pancreas to other organs).  Symptoms can include:

  • Jaundice
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Stomach bloating
  • Burning sensation in the stomach
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Floating stools
  • Dark urine
  • Fever
  • Chills and sweats

A person with signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer should consult their physician.  A series of tests can be ordered to diagnose the disease.  If cancer is detected, a doctor will try to determine the stage based on the size of the tumor, the spread to nearby lymph nodes, or the spread to distant lymph nodes and organs.   Pancreatic cancer stages range from zero to four.

Treatment for pancreatic cancer depends on various factors such as the location and stage of cancer as well as the status of your overall health. Your doctor may recommend radiation therapy or surgery, or a combination of both.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is National Family Caregivers Month

November is National Family Caregivers Month.  The observance was created by the Caregiver Action Network as an initiative to honor family caregivers across the United States.

Taking care of a loved one with a serious illness can be physically and mentally challenging. Many family caregivers often experience sleep deprivation, poor eating habits, stress, anxiety or depression; all of which can take a toll on their health.

As a family caregiver, it is important to keep in mind that taking care of your own health is equally as important as caring for the health of loved ones.   You need to be at your best in order to take good care of others.

Here are a few tips to help you take care of yourself while caring for loved ones:

  • Recognize when you are stressed-Paying attention to early signs of stress can you help to identify stressors and put a plan into action to diminish or reduce their effects.
  • Make time for yourself- It is important to take breaks to avoid burnout and help you re-energize.
  • Take care of your health-Neglecting your health can lead to medical complications. It is important that you eat healthy, exercise and keep up with routine doctor visits.
  • Ask for help- Caring for a loved one can be overwhelming; feeling alone and overwhelmed can lead to depression or anxiety. It is important that you do not isolate yourself and seek the support of a group or individual that can help you navigate challenges.

Being a caregiver often requires a 24/7 commitment. While this level of dedication can be difficult, there are many resources available to alleviate some of the challenges.  The Caregiver Action Network provides helpful tools to help you overcome obstacles you may encounter. Please visit caregiveraction.org for more information.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Delicious Recipe for Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Rolls

Big orange pumpkins are most frequently associated with the Fall season. They can be decorated for display purposes and they can also be used in many recipes. Here is a recipe from The Pioneer Woman magazine for pumpkin spice cinnamon rolls that you will definitely enjoy.  https://www.thepioneerwoman.com/food-cooking/recipes/a11247/pumpkin-cinnamon-rolls/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Introducing Forest Hills Pediatric Specialists

The MediSys Health Network, parent organization of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and Flushing Hospital Medical Center, is proud to announce the opening of our brand new TJH office: Forest Hills Pediatric Specialists, a fully renovated, state-of-the-art office that provides accessible, advanced pediatric care to local patients.

The office and is operated by a team of expert pediatric doctors, including:

Edmund Kessler, a pediatric surgeon with over 35 years of clinical experience. He performs over 500 abdominal wall hernia surgeries each year as well as appendicitis surgeries, general surgeries, and other procedures.

Rebecca Winderman, a pediatric gastroenterologist who treats various gastrointestinal issues affecting children, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease, and inflammatory disease of the esophagus (EOE).

Hariram Ganesh, a pediatric endocrinologist with over 14 years of experience treating a variety of medical issues, including conditions related to puberty and the thyroid.

Esra Fakioglu, a pediatric infectious disease specialist with experience treating a wide range of illnesses affecting children ranging in age from infancy to young adulthood.

The doctors at Forest Hills Pediatric Specialists are affiliated with several New York City healthcare organizations, including the MediSys Health Network, providing patients with fast, easy access to world-class pediatric expertise and treatment both locally and at multiple major medical centers as needed for advanced procedures.

“We understand the importance of building and maintaining close relationships with all of our pediatric patients and their parents,” said Dr. Kessler. “Our team of doctors, nurses, and support staff aim not only to provide them with the highest quality of care, but also to ensure that it is delivered in a caring and compassionate manner.”

The Forest Hills Pediatric Specialists office is located at 107-21 Queens Boulevard, Suite 7, and is open Monday to Friday from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. For more information about the office, please call (718) 704-5020.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.