A Fall Recipe for Creamy French Onion and Mushroom Soup

Today is the first day of Fall and a perfect time to prepare a delicious creamy French onion and mushroom soup to welcome in the season. Here is a recipe from halfbakedharvest.com to enjoy.  https://www.halfbakedharvest.com/creamy-french-onion-and-mushroom-soup/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Alzheimer’s Month

This September, Flushing Hospital Medical Center is raising awareness about the signs, symptoms, and causes of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia as part of the World Alzheimer’s Month campaign. Alzheimer’s is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and the most common cause of dementia among older adults.

A person with Alzheimer’s gradually loses their cognitive abilities, including memory recollection and behavioral regulation. In the later stages of the disease, a person can even lose their motor functions, leaving them unable to perform basic daily tasks such as bathing independently.

People can also suffer from multiple forms of dementia at once. This is referred to as “mixed” dementia and often occurs as a combination of Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia.

Memory problems are one of the main early signs of Alzheimer’s, though they may be difficult to distinguish from similar symptoms of mild cognitive impairment. People in the early stages of Alzheimer’s may also have problems with word-finding, vision, reasoning, and finding their way around familiar places. These problems may appear or worsen as the disease progresses.

A mix of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors are believed to influence the development of Alzheimer’s; however, specific causes of the disease are unknown. As Alzheimer’s progresses, abnormal amyloid and tau proteins spread throughout the brain as changes in its structure and functions occur. There’s no clear way to prevent this spread, though early research indicates that regular activity and good heart health may help.

If you or a loved one are displaying potential signs of Alzheimer’s disease, you can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center to receive a diagnosis or treatment by calling (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Over-The-Counter Hearing Aids

Hearing loss affects millions of people living in the U.S.  It is a common health problem that occurs in older adults. In fact, almost half of adults ages 65 and older suffer from some degree of hearing loss.  Unfortunately for some, there are barriers to obtaining affordable and effective hearing aids.

In an effort to improve access to safe, effective, and affordable hearing aids, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued a ruling to allow over-the-counter (OTC) purchases of the devices. “This action enables consumers 18 years of age and older with perceived mild to moderate hearing loss to purchase hearing aids directly from stores or online retailers without the need for a medical exam, prescription, or a fitting adjustment by an audiologist.”

The FDA also stated that consumers may be able to purchase hearing aids at traditional drugstores and pharmacies as well as online retail stores as soon as mid-October.  Consumers are being encouraged to learn more about over-the-counter hearing aids before making a purchase. Here are some important facts potential buyers should know:

  • OTC hearing aids are only intended for adults with perceived mild to moderate hearing loss.
  • OTC hearing aids may not help you if you have trouble hearing loud sounds such as power tools or have trouble hearing conversations in quiet places.
  • OTC hearing aids are not intended for use by children with hearing loss.
  • OTC hearing aids should not be confused with personal sound amplification products (PSAPs). Hearing aids are medical devices designed to help a person with or compensate for impaired hearing, while PSAPs are electronics that are used by non-hearing impaired persons to amplify sounds in certain environments.
  • Although most OTC hearing aids will be designed to fit most, choosing the best device for you may take some trial and error.

If you are experiencing hearing loss,  it is recommended that you see a doctor. Your physician can rule out any serious causes including earwax buildup or certain medical conditions. A doctor can also help you to determine if you are a good candidate for OTC hearing aids.

You should also see a doctor if you are experiencing the following symptoms: dizziness, ringing, roaring or beeping in the ear, the drainage of fluid or pus from the ear, or persistent pain or discomfort in the ear.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are Bone Spurs?

Bone spurs, also known as osteophytes, are small growths that often develop along the edges of bones in the joints or spine. They commonly occur in conjunction with certain arthritic conditions.

Bone spurs sometimes protrude from their position, causing you to feel bumps or knobs in the spots where they’re present and interfering with your range of motion in the affected area. In most cases, you may not experience any symptoms. However, if they do occur, they may include pain, numbness, weakness, or tears in tendons that rub against or come into contact with bone spurs.

The most common cause of bone spurs, osteoarthritis, is also the most common form of arthritis. It often affects adults aged 50 or older, though people of any age can suffer from osteoarthritis and, by extension, develop bone spurs.

Osteoarthritis isn’t the only form of arthritis that can cause bone spurs. Ankylosing spondylitis causes spinal inflammation and the fusion of your vertebrae, causing spinal bone spurs to form.

Bone spurs that aren’t causing painful symptoms likely won’t require treatment, but if they’re significantly interfering with your daily life, a doctor can prescribe medication and physical therapy or recommend surgery to remove them. Additionally, applying ice to the affected area, taking over-the-counter pain relievers, losing weight to reduce pressure on your bones and joints, and using equipment such as supportive shoes or inserts can all help you manage your symptoms.

The best way to prevent bone spurs is to prevent the conditions that cause them. This can be achieved by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising to maintain your range of motion, controlling your blood sugar, and making an effort to preserve your joints through stretching and the use of protective equipment.

You can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center to receive a diagnosis or explore your treatment options by calling (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Aging Month

For this year’s Healthy Aging Month, Flushing Hospital Medical Center is taking the opportunity to provide our community with information that can help you maximize your potential health benefits as you age.

Some of the best ways to stay healthy as an older person include staying physically active, maintaining a nutritious diet, consistently socializing with supportive friends and family, and routinely visiting your doctor to prevent potential health risks.

Many people gradually engage in less physical activity as they get older, with half of all women and one third of all men aged 75 and older becoming completely inactive. Keeping up with light or moderate physical activity such as walking or weight-lifting is associated with significant health benefits, including better-maintained muscles, bones, and joints, a reduced risk of physical injury, improved blood pressure, and a more positive mood.

Nutrition also factors into your physical and mental health way as you age. A healthy diet full of fruits, vegetables, lean protein, and water can be helpful for staying active and reducing your risk of developing chronic medical conditions.

Socialization is also important when it comes to your health. Friends and family can act as a safety net in times of need, support the activities that keep you healthy and provide companionship that can help you maintain a positive state of mind.

Finally, routine check-ins with your doctor can help identify and promptly treat any medical issues that may arise as you age. You can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Who is Eligible for the Second Covid-19 Booster ?

Covid-19 vaccines remain highly effective in preventing severe disease and hospitalizations. However, it is believed that the effectiveness of a Covid-19 vaccine tends to decrease over time. A booster is recommended to help maintain a strong level of protection against the virus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) a person’s age and medical history are used to determine how many vaccines and boosters are appropriate.

For the most up-to-date CDC recommendations on Covid-19 vaccines and boosters, follow this link to the CDC website https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/stay-up-to-date.html#recommendations

The CDC recommends all who are eligible to get the booster. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sexual Health Awareness Month

September is Sexual Health Awareness Month. During this time, we will explore sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and prevention.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in every five people has a sexually transmitted infection. They are more likely to occur in young adults. The most common STI is human papillomavirus (HPV), but other common diseases include chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital herpes, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

STIs primarily spread through vaginal, anal, and oral sex; however, diseases such as herpes and HPV can also spread through skin-to-skin contact.  STIs are best prevented by avoiding sexual contact with infected people, getting vaccinated, and using condoms during any form of sexual contact.

Keeping sexual contact safe can be achieved when clear boundaries are set and agreed upon by all involved, and when there is access to medical care and contraceptive services.

Part of staying sexually healthy is recognizing your right to protect your sexual health and making sure you have the resources available to do so safely. For confidential sexual health treatment, you can visit or schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at (718) 670-5486 or our Women’s Health Department at (718) 670-5702.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Head Lice Prevention Month

Since 1985, healthcare organizations have informed communities about head lice symptoms, diagnosis, and prevention for National Pediculosis Prevention Month, also known as Head Lice Prevention Month.

Although reliable data isn’t available on this condition, pediculosis (head lice infestation) is fairly common. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately six to 12 million infestations affect children between the ages of three to 11 each year. Adults can also develop infestations through contact with both children and other adults.

Head lice typically spread through contact with the hair of an infested person, though it can also occur when people share clothes or lay on furniture after an infested person has recently used them. Lice typically remain on a person’s scalp; however, in rare instances, they may move to the eyelashes or eyebrows.

Signs of pediculosis include the feeling of something moving through the hair, itching, the development of sores on the scalp, and difficulty sleeping due to the increased activity of head lice in the dark. A diagnosis is generally made when live head lice are found on the scalp.

You can prevent the spread of head lice by teaching your child to avoid sharing clothes or supplies, using furniture recently used by an infested person, or coming into head-to-head contact with friends or classmates. It’s also helpful to encourage them to regularly comb their hair. You can keep yourself free of head lice by following these recommendations, as well.

If an infestation has already developed, lice removal kits are a non-chemical solution for combing lice out of an infested person’s hair. Several over-the-counter and prescription lice removal shampoos, creams, lotions, and drugs are also available.

If you or your child need a diagnosis or treatment for head lice, schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are Comorbidities?

As part of Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s ongoing efforts to increase the healthcare literacy of our patients, we will discuss the term “comorbidity,” which may be used by the healthcare team when treating patients with chronic conditions.

Comorbidity is the existence of two or more medical conditions in the same person. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, four out of ten people in the United States suffer from chronic comorbidities.

Comorbid conditions are often serious chronic illnesses such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, lung disease, Alzheimer’s, chronic kidney disease, and stroke, which account for a substantial number of deaths and disabilities each year.

Certain conditions may be more likely to develop among people with other chronic illnesses. Arthritis, for example, affects nearly half of all people diagnosed with diabetes or heart disease, as well as over a quarter of all obese people.

The term “comorbidity” doesn’t just apply to chronic physical disease. Psychiatric comorbidities are also common, with depression often occurring in conjunction with substance abuse and anxiety disorders, though it can also occur alongside serious or chronic physical conditions such as cancer, heart disease, or stroke.

Comorbidities may not necessarily be life-threatening in all cases, but they can often be debilitating. Comorbid conditions may make the symptoms of a primary condition more difficult to manage and substantially increase medical care costs.

The best way to prevent comorbidities is to take steps to prevent primary chronic conditions or manage any risk factors of one you already have that may overlap with other conditions. Lifestyle changes such as limiting alcohol and tobacco intake, improving your nutrition, and incorporating regular physical exercise into your schedule may help. If you already suffer from one or more medical conditions, you’ll also need to work with your doctor to determine how treatment for one condition may affect another.

Flushing Hospital offers advanced care for a wide range of physical and psychiatric conditions. To schedule an appointment with a doctor, please call our Ambulatory Care Center at (718) 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

International Overdose Awareness Day

The annual International Overdose Awareness Day campaign began in 2001. In the years since then, government and non-governmental agencies worldwide have worked to raise awareness about drug overdoses and the issues surrounding them.

According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, over half a million people died from drug overdoses internationally in 2019. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics also reported that over 100,000 people in the United States alone died due to drug overdoses in 2021. This is an increase of more than 8,000 deaths since 2020.

Many of these deaths may be fueled by factors such as economic uncertainty, increased rates of anxiety and depression, and insufficient mental health resources. Additionally, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl have become more available since the COVID-19 pandemic as access to other drugs such as heroin has decreased.

People who regularly use drugs have also become more likely to do so alone since the beginning of the pandemic. This greatly increases the risk of overdose, as there’s no one present to call 911 or administer life-saving treatments such as naloxone in the event of an emergency.

You don’t have to face addiction or mental health issues alone. If you’ve developed a substance abuse problem, Flushing Hospital’s Division of Addiction Services provides a safe space for drug withdrawal and offers access to psychiatric assistance, substance abuse counseling, and care from our medical team. Our Reflections treatment program also offers helpful holistic techniques for curbing addictive behaviors.

To learn more about our addiction services, call Flushing Hospital Medical Center at (718) 670-5693 or (718) 670-5540. For more information about the Reflections program, call (718) 670-5078.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.