What To Do When Your Baby Suddenly Stops Breastfeeding

When most people hear the words “nursing strike” the most common assumption is that it has something to do with a work stoppage by hospital caregivers, but the term can also refer to when a baby suddenly refuses to breastfeed. This response can sometimes be mistaken for weaning, but unlike a nursing strike, weaning normally takes places gradually over a period of weeks or months.

Nursing strikes can be frightening and upsetting to both you and your baby, but they are almost always temporary. Most nursing strikes end with your baby back to breastfeeding, within a few days. In some cases the cause is a mystery, but most of the time it is due to some external factor. Some of the most common triggers for a nursing strike include:

  • An illness affecting your baby such as an ear infection or stuffy nose
  • A change in deodorant, soap, lotion or anything that would result in you smelling different to your baby
  • Your baby is teething or experiencing sore gums
  • A temporary reduction in milk supply
  • A change in nursing patterns
  • Your baby was frightened during a previous nursing experience

Whatever the cause, getting the baby back to the breast can sometimes be challenging. Here are some tips that can help get your baby back to breastfeeding:

  • Be patient. Don’t try to force your baby to breastfeed as it can make the situation worse.
  • Rule out any physical problems such as an ear infection, stuffy nose, teething issues or a bladder infection.
  • Spend more skin-to-skin time together.
  • Avoid giving your baby a pacifier.
  • Attempt to nurse when your baby is either falling asleep, sound asleep, or just waking up.
  • Movement helps so try putting your baby in a sling while you walk around or try relaxing in a rocking chair.
  • Take a bath together or cuddle in a quiet, dark room.

You should continue to pump or hand express milk while your baby is refusing to nurse to prevent plugged ducts and infections.  It is also important to remain calm and understand that your baby isn’t rejecting you and while the situation can be upsetting that it is only temporary and everything will go back to normal.

If your baby is experiencing a nursing strike and you have additional questions, you should speak with your doctor or a lactation consultant.

If you would like to speak to a lactation consultant at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5201.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Wants You To Know About Cold Sores

Cold sores are small fluid filled blisters, also known as fever blisters, that are develop on or near the mouth and the lips. They are caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). Cold sores are highly contagious and are spread by coming in close contact with secretions from the blisters or sharing utensils or other personal hygiene items with an infected person. It is important to keep in mind that the virus can spread even when an infected person does not have a cold sore.

A cold sore usually develops in several stages during an outbreak. The stages of a cold sore are:

1 Tingling and itching near the mouth
2 Formation of a fluid filled blister
3 The blister breaks
4 Scab forms
5 Scab falls off and sore heals

Additional symptoms a person may experience during an outbreak include:

  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle aches
  • Swollen lymph nodes

There are several factors that can cause a cold sore to develop or reoccur if a person has already had an outbreak in the past: These include:

  • Stress
  • Fatigue
  • Eating certain foods
  • Having a cold
  • Allergic reaction

The diagnosis of a cold sore can usually be made by visual inspection. It is also possible to do a blood test to see if the virus is present.

There are no cures for a cold sore but there are ways to treat the symptoms.  Antiviral medications are often prescribed and there re over the counter medications treatment available to purchase.

Speak to your physician if you think you have a cold sore and it doesn’t start to heal in two weeks. You can also schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Aortic Valve Disease

One of the most important organs of the body is the heart. It’s main function is to pump oxygenated blood to the rest of the body which is what keeps us alive.

The heart has four chambers, two on the right and two on the left. Blood enters the heart through the right atrium, it then passes to the right ventricle. From the right ventricle the heart pumps blood to the lungs where it receives oxygen and then returns blood into the left atrium.  From the left atrium blood then passes to the left ventricle. The heart then pumps blood to the rest of the body from the left ventricle through the aortic valve and into the aorta.   When this valve doesn’t function properly, it causes a condition called aortic valve disease.

Aortic valve disease can be due to a birth defect, an infection, the aging process, or an injury to the heart.

There are two main types of aortic valve disease:

Aortic valve stenosis is a condition where the aortic valve opening is narrowed due the valve flaps being either thickened, fused or too stiff. This leads to reduced blood flow from the heart to the aorta. This can be caused by a calcium buildup on the valve leaflets. A history of rheumatic fever can also lead to aortic valve stenosis.

Aortic valve regurgitation is a condition where blood flows back into the heart from the aorta due to the valve flaps being weakened and unable to keep the blood flowing in only one direction. This may be due to a birth defect that worsens over time.

Aortic valve disease can cause the following symptoms:

  • Heart murmur
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swollen ankles
  • Fatigue
  • Chest pain
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Dizziness

Aortic valve disease can lead to heart related complications such as stroke, blood clots, heart failure, and death.

Diagnosing aortic valve disease is done by a physician who will take a full medical history and listen to the heart with a stethoscope to determine if there are signs of a murmur. Diagnostic tests will foloow and these include an electrocardiogram, an echocardiogram and a chest x-ray to determine if the heart appears enlarged. Other tests that may be performed are a CT scan, a MRI, and a stress test.

Treatment options depend on the severity of the disease. They can range from lifestyle changes,  such as stress reduction, smoking cessation,  and diet modification, and possibly prescribing medications to control heart function. In more severe cases surgery to repair or replace the valve may be necessary.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Chilean Lentil Stew with Salsa Verde

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Outpatient Dietitian Laura Wang is sharing one of her favorite stew recipes.

Chilean Lentil Stew with Salsa Verde!

This delicious hearty meal is only 322 calories per serving.

Here is the step-by-step recipe that can be found by clicking the link below –

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/274835/chilean-lentil-stew-with-salsa-verde/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Stages of Wound Healing

Whether it’s a minor cut or a more serious injury everyone has sustained a wound at some point in their life. Each time we develop a break in our skin our bodies go through a wound healing process to repair the damage, but how does this happen?

When the skin is injured, our body sets into motion an automatic series of events, often referred to as the “cascade of healing,” in order to repair the injured tissues. The cascade of healing is divided into these four overlapping phases:

Phase 1: Stop the bleeding (hemostasis)
The first stage of wound healing is for the body to stop the bleeding. This is called hemostasis or clotting and it occurs within seconds to minutes after you suffer a wound. During this phase the body activates its emergency repair system to form a dam to block the drainage and prevent too much blood loss. Clotting also helps to close and heal the wound, making a scab.

Phase 2: Scabbing over
Once your wound isn’t bleeding any more, the body can begin cleaning and healing it. First, the blood vessels around the wound open a bit to allow more blood flow to it. Fresh blood brings more oxygen and nutrients to the wound.  White blood cells called macrophages help clean the wound by fighting any infection. They also send out chemical messengers called growth factors that help repair the area.

Phase 3: Rebuilding
After the wound is clean and stable, your body can begin rebuilding the site. Oxygen-rich red blood cells come to the site to create new tissue. Chemical signals in the body tell cells around the wound to make elastic tissues called collagen. This helps to repair the skin and tissues in the wound. At this stage in healing, you might see a fresh, raised, red scar. The scar will slowly fade in color and look flatter.

Phase 4: Maturation (strengthening)
Even after your wound looks closed and repaired, it’s still healing – this is called the Maturation phase. During this phase the new tissue slowly gains strength and flexibility. You may also experience itching or tightness over the area at this time. This phase can last anywhere from a few weeks to months.

If you suffered a wound, you can help the healing process by thoroughly cleaning it with mild soap and water and covering it with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. See your doctor if you think your wound has become infected.

Due to a variety of underlying conditions, some people may experience slow or non-healing wounds.  For those patients, Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a Wound Care Center.  Speak to you doctor to see if you require specialized wound healing services.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mental Health Issues Affecting Young Adults

Mental health services Flushing New York

Mental health issues are on the rise in adolescents and young adults (12-25 years of age) living in the United States. In research published by the American Psychological Association, it was reported that, “More U.S. adolescents and young adults in the late 2010s, versus the mid-2000s, experienced serious psychological distress, major depression or suicidal thoughts, and more attempted suicide.”

Experts believe the reason for the increase in mental health problems in young adults is due in part to an increase of digital media and electronic communication.  Studies show that young adults are having less face-to face interactions and are spending less time with friends, neither of which are advantageous for mental health. Additionally, many young adults are feeling pressured to present a flawless physical appearance or a perfect life online. They often measure themselves against unrealistic and often fabricated ideals which can affect self-esteem. 

It was also found that young adults are getting less sleep because too much time of their time is spent on electronic devices such as smartphones.  Young adults tend to be late night screen addicts, as there is always a need to feel connected to electronic devices due to a fear of missing out. A study published in the Journal of Youth Studies showed that “1 in 5 young people regularly wake up in the night to send or check messages on social media.” 

Sleep deprivation in young adults can take a toll on their mental health. A lack of sleep over time can affect mood and lead to mental health disorders such as depression.

There are steps that can be taken to minimize the negative effects digital media and electronic communication can have on mental health.  They include:

  • Minimizing  or setting time limits on screen time
  • Encouraging face-to-face social interactions
  • Taking breaks from social media
  • Putting devices on a “ Do Not Disturb” mode before going to bed
  • Monitoring and customizing social media feeds to minimize exposure to negative or harmful content
  • Building self-esteem

If someone you know is experiencing mental health problems, please encourage them to seek the assistance of mental health professional.

To schedule an appointment with a Mental Health Professional at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, call 718-670-5562.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Earns Age-Friendly Health System Status

Flushing Hospital Medical Center is proud to announce that we have earned an “Age-Friendly Health System” status; a designation that less than 20 percent of the health care facilities across the country have yet to receive.

Receiving an Age-Friendly status demonstrates that Flushing Hospital is committed to this rapidly growing movement to improve the health care for older adults.

This initiative was a collaborative effort founded in 2017 by the John A. Hartford Foundation, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the American Hospital Association (AHA), and the Catholic Health Association of the United States (CHA) with the intention of helping hospitals and other care settings implement a set of evidence-based interventions specifically designed to improve care for older adults.

The initiative is guided by a framework of essential elements known as the “4Ms”, which include:

  • What Matters – Communicating with our patients to better understand their personal and healthcare goals. This is achieved by asking a series of questions to the patient as well as family members or caregivers. Factors in what matters most to our patients could include end-of-life care, placement issues, or financial concerns.
  • Medication – Prescribing age-friendly medications that do not interfere with the goals of our older patients. This includes not prescribing certain medications that can affect a patient’s mobility and using our electronic medical record system to identify potentially inappropriate medications.
  • Mentation – Preventing, identifying, treating and managing mental health issues such as depression and dementia in our older patients. This involves conducting a mental health status examination.
  • Mobility – Ensuring that our older adult patients move safely and maintain function. This is done by getting our patients to ambulate more while in our care and by conducting a Fall Risk Assessment and providing mobility devices if necessary.

Receiving this designation was a collaborative effort led by Dr. Angelo Canedo and Dr. Alan Roth and included a leadership committee comprised of physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators. After a rigorous nine-month process that included educating all of our providers and submitting data that demonstrated the 4Ms have been incorporated into our practices.

The 4M initiative for treating older adults is currently being practiced throughout our network, by providers in our Emergency Departments, Ambulatory Care Centers, Inpatient Units, and in our long-term care facility

“Older adults deserve safe, high-quality healthcare. The Age-Friendly Health System initiative is an important part of our vision to provide it to them,” stated Dr. Alan Roth. “We worked very hard to achieve this goal and are extremely appreciative of those who contributed to helping us attain it.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Importance of Keeping Hydrated in Cold Weather

The level of humidity in the air during the winter months tends to be much lower, resulting in much drier air as compared to other times of the year.  In addition, the air in our homes is also drier due to home heating. These differences in air quality both inside and outside can increase our chances of becoming dehydrated.

Other factors that can lead to dehydration in the winter include:

  • Cold-induced diuresis (frequent urination)
  • Drinking less water because we tend to feel less thirsty
  • Wearing heavier clothing which can cause us to perspire more
  • Increased respiratory  rates which leads to greater water loss

It is important that we stay hydrated in winter because doing so helps keep our body temperature at a constant and normal level. When there isn’t enough fluid in the body, this can cause the core temperature to drop to dangerous levels. Hypothermia can set in quicker if the body is dehydrated. Staying hydrated is also helps our immune system fight off colds and the flu, which are more common in the winter.

Things to avoid in cold weather to prevent dehydration include caffeinated beverages and alcoholic beverages.  It is also recommended that you don’t drink cold beverages, but rather warm or room temperature beverages because this will lead to more frequent urination.

Signs and symptoms of dehydration to look out for include:

  • Severe thirst
  • Reduced urine output
  • Dark urine for long periods of time
  • Dizziness
  • A rapid heart rate
  • Muscle cramps

If you have any signs of dehydration during the winter months, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

New Year’s Weight Loss Goals

One of the most common New Year’s resolutions is losing weight.  For some, this goal can be accomplished through diet and exercise; however, for others losing weight may require more intensive approaches.

Losing a significant amount of weight can be very challenging, especially for people who are overweight or obese. Weight loss (bariatric surgery) has been proven to be a safe and effective way to overcome this challenge.

Bariatric surgery is performed on the stomach or intestines to reduce food intake or absorption, and induce weight loss. Weight loss surgery can also help those who are at risk of diabetes and hypertension to reduce their chances of developing these or other obesity-related diseases.

If you are interested in surgery, one of the first steps you should take is finding out if you are a good candidate.  Surgery may be appropriate for people who:

  • Have a body mass index  (BMI) over 40
  • Are over 100 lbs. over  their ideal body weight
  • Are experiencing disabling pain in weight-bearing joints
  • Have a BMI of 35 along with obesity-related disorders such as high blood pressure, diabetes, sleep apnea or degenerative joint disease.
  • Have tried to lose weight through diet and exercise but  have been unsuccessful

Choosing a weight loss surgery provider that is accredited by programs such as the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP®) is highly recommended. This accreditation ensures that your provider follows a high standard of care.

Flushing Hospital’s Bariatric Surgical Center is the first Bariatric Center of Excellence accredited by the MBSAQIP. The center provides care from a multi-disciplinary group of health care practitioners who are compassionate and fully invested in helping you in every step of your weight loss journey.

To learn more about Flushing Hospital’s Bariatric Surgical Center, please call 718-408-6977or 718-670-8908.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Make Your Smile a Priority in 2020

We have all made New Year’s resolutions at some point in our lives. Many of these

annual vows revolve around improving our health.  Typical resolutions may include losing weight, quitting smoking, or beginning an exercise routine, but what about our oral health? The New Year is also a good time to commit ourselves to better dental care.

Make 2018 the year you look to improve your smile. Some ways to help you meet this goal include:

  • Practice Good Oral Hygiene – Daily brushing and flossing is a simple way to improve your oral health. For successful bacterial plaque removal, it is important to brush at least twice a day and floss at least once per day to remove bacterial plaque and food that has accumulated throughout the day. Daily brushing and flossing help to prevent gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and halitosis (bad breath). The daily use of antimicrobial and fluoride mouth rinses also helps to improve your oral health.
  • Watch What You Eat and Drink – An important part of achieving your dental health resolutions is making healthier food and beverage choices, especially for snacks. Frequent consumption of food and beverages containing carbohydrates and acids contributes to tooth decay.
  • Quit Smoking – Quitting cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use is important for improving your oral and overall health. There is no better time than the present to make a resolution to stop tobacco use. Consider free online tools, smoking cessation groups, progress-tracking apps and support from friends and family to assist you with tobacco cessation.
  • Use Whitening Products – There are several over-the-counter smile-improving products that you
    can use to whiten your teeth when you brush and floss. In recent years, tooth whitening has acquired enormous popularity because they can enhance the appearance of teeth by removing deep (intrinsic) or surface (extrinsic) stains.
  • Receive Regular Check-Ups – A resolution to make routine visits to the dentist may help prevent oral disease or reveal an existing disease in its early stage. Dental visits should take place every six months to allow your dentist and dental hygienists to monitor the condition of your oral cavity and develop an appropriate treatment plan to meet your wants and needs.

Some however might need to make more than a few lifestyle changes to address their dental needs. For those, a dentist or orthodontist can help. Make this the year you stop putting off having dental work done. An orthodontist can correct an overbite or straighten crooked teeth and a dentist can address your need for crowns, implants or fillings to preserve your tooth structure.

To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Dental Center, please call 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.