Understanding The Symptoms Of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that develops when the body’s immune system attacks its own nerves.

Flushing Hospital Provides Information About Guillain-Barre Syndrome

The initial symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome are weakness that usually begins in the lower extremities and spreads to the upper body and arms. This is accompanied by a tingling or prickling sensation in the extremities. These symptoms can rapidly intensify, eventually paralyzing the entire body.

Other signs and symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome may include:

  • Unsteady walking or inability to walk or climb stairs
  • Difficulty with eye or facial movements, including speaking, chewing or swallowing
  • Severe pain that may feel achy or cramp-like and may be worse at night
  • Difficulty with bladder control or bowel function
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Low or high blood pressure
  • Difficulty breathing

The cause of Guillain-Barre syndrome is unknown, but it is often preceded by an infectious illness such as a respiratory infection or the stomach flu.  It can also be triggered by certain viruses, such as influenza, Epstein-Barr, or Zika.  Anyone can get Guillain-Barre syndrome, but it is slightly more common in men and typically affects younger adults.

There is no known cure for Guillain-Barre syndrome, but several treatments can ease symptoms and reduce the duration of the illness. Most people recover from Guillain-Barre syndrome, though some may experience lingering effects from it, such as weakness, numbness or fatigue.

Call your doctor if you have mild tingling in your toes or fingers that doesn’t seem to be spreading or getting worse. If you do not have a doctor and would like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-

wn nerves.

The initial symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome are weakness that usually begins in the lower extremities and spreads to the upper body and arms. This is accompanied by a tingling or prickling sensation in the extremities. These symptoms can rapidly intensify, eventually paralyzing the entire body.

Other signs and symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome may include:

  • Unsteady walking or inability to walk or climb stairs
  • Difficulty with eye or facial movements, including speaking, chewing or swallowing
  • Severe pain that may feel achy or cramp-like and may be worse at night
  • Difficulty with bladder control or bowel function
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Low or high blood pressure
  • Difficulty breathing

The cause of Guillain-Barre syndrome is unknown, but it is often preceded by an infectious illness such as a respiratory infection or the stomach flu.  It can also be triggered by certain viruses, such as influenza, Epstein-Barr, or Zika.  Anyone can get Guillain-Barre syndrome, but it is slightly more common in men and typically affects younger adults.

There is no known cure for Guillain-Barre syndrome, but several treatments can ease symptoms and reduce the duration of the illness. Most people recover from Guillain-Barre syndrome, though some may experience lingering effects from it, such as weakness, numbness or fatigue.

Call your doctor if you have mild tingling in your toes or fingers that doesn’t seem to be spreading or getting worse. If you do not have a doctor and would like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do You Have A cough That You Just Can’t Shake? You Might Have A Chronic Cough

Having a cough is not only annoying, but it can also affect your daily routine, disrupt your sleep and even contribute to other issues, such as vomiting and lightheadedness. For most, coughing will only last a few days to a week, but if you have a cough that just won’t go away, you may have what is considered a chronic cough.

Flushing Hospital warns a cough that lasts over 8 weeks is considered chronic and our doctors can help determine the cause

A chronic cough is a medical problem where a person will have a cough that lasts eight weeks or longer (four weeks or longer in children). While it can sometimes be difficult to pinpoint the problem that’s triggering a chronic cough, it is most commonly due to one or a combination of the following:

  • Postnasal drip
  • Tobacco use
  • Asthma
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD
  • Infections such as whopping cough or TB
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Taking blood pressure medications

Fortunately, a chronic cough typically disappears once the underlying problem is treated.

See your doctor if you have a cough that lingers for weeks, especially one that brings up sputum or blood, disturbs your sleep, or affects school or work.

To make an appointment to see a doctor about your chronic cough, please call Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn More About Scarlet Fever And How To Protect Your Children

Scarlet fever is a bacterial illness that develops in some people who have strep throat. As the name implies, the condition is signified by a bright red rash that covers most of the body.

if untreated scarlet fever can b very dangerous for children, Flushing Hospital

Scarlet fever is most common in children five to 15 years of age. Although it was once considered a serious childhood illness, antibiotic treatments have made scarlet fever much more treatable. Still, if left untreated, scarlet fever can result in serious conditions that can affect the heart, kidneys, lungs and other parts of the body.

Common symptoms of scarlet fever include:

  • Red rash.The rash looks like a sunburn and feels like sandpaper. It typically begins on the face or neck and spreads to the trunk, arms and legs. If pressure is applied to the reddened skin, it will turn pale.
  • Red lines.The folds of skin around the groin, armpits, elbows, knees and neck usually become a deeper red than the surrounding rash.
  • Flushed face.The face may appear flushed with a pale ring around the mouth.
  • Strawberry tongue.The tongue generally looks red and bumpy, and it’s often covered with a white coating early in the disease.

The rash and the redness in the face and tongue usually last about a week. After these signs and symptoms have subsided, the skin affected by the rash often peels. Other signs and symptoms associated with scarlet fever include fever, sore throat, enlarged glands, nausea, vomiting and headache.

Scarlet fever typically spreads from person to person via droplets expelled when an infected person coughs or sneezes. A person will usually develop symptoms between two and four days after being exposed.

There is no vaccine to prevent scarlet fever. The best prevention strategies for scarlet fever is to practice proper hand washing hygiene, avoid sharing utensils or drinking glasses, wipe down all contaminated objects and surfaces and cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze.

Call your doctor immediately if your child develops any symptoms associated with scarlet fever.

To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s pediatric clinic, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Causing the Ringing in Your Ears?

Many of us will hear it from time to time. Only you can hear it- a ringing in your ear that may come and go.  The medical term for it: tinnitus. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), about 10% of adults in America have experienced tinnitus lasting at least five minutes in the past year.

Some of the causes you may experience ringing in your ears can be:

  • Trauma to the ear. This can include listening to your music loudly. The recommended listening should be at less than 90 decibels according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines.
  • Wax Build- up. Some people produce more ear wax than others. Instead of using Q-Tips, try softening the ear wax with peroxide or mineral oil and allow the wax to dissolve and drain.Ear Ringing-181524972
  • Excessive use of certain medicines such as aspiring or antibiotics.
  • Too much caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol, have also been known to cause ringing in the ears as well.

Is the ringing persistent? Contact Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center and schedule an appointment to see a physician at 718-670-5486..

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Much Water Should You Drink During Exercise

Physical medicine and rehabilitation in Flushing NYStaying hydrated while exercising is very important, especially during the hotter months when we tend to lose more water by sweating. The best way to hydrate our bodies is to drink water, as it helps to prevent dehydration.

While drinking water greatly benefits our bodies, consuming too much can have adverse effects, one of which is hyponatremia.  This condition occurs when the blood becomes excessively diluted from drinking too much water, dangerously reducing sodium levels in our bodies.  Hyponatremia can result in symptoms such as nausea, fatigue, headaches, and in severe but rare cases, death.  It is important to follow proper hydration guidelines to avoid these symptoms.

According to Harvard Health, four to six cups of fluid daily is generally recommended for most people to consume. While exercising, The American Council on Exercise recommends drinking:

  • Seventeen to 20 ounces of fluid, 2 to 3 hours before  working out
  • Another 8 ounces, 20 to 30 minutes before starting your workout
  • Seven to 10 ounces, every 10 to 20 minutes while exercising
  • Eight ounces post workout

General recommendations are based on weight and gender. They may vary with each individual. It is  also important to keep in mind, that individuals with certain health conditions such as kidney or liver disease may retain too much fluid and should consult their physician

If you are uncertain about how much water you should drink per day or while exercising, speak with your doctor.  He or she will be able to provide more specific guidelines.

To speak with a doctor at  Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are Tremors And Why Do They Occur?

A tremor is an involuntary, rhythmic muscle contraction that results in shaking movements in one or more parts of the body. They most commonly affect the hands but can also occur in the arms, head, vocal cords or legs. Tremors can come and go, but they can also be constant. They can take place without reason or occur as a result of another disorder.  While they are not life threatening, tremors can be debilitating, making it very difficult to perform many daily tasks.

tremor, Flushing Hospital, Parkinson's Disease, Traumatic Brain Injury

Tremors are usually caused by a problem in the parts of the brain that control movement. Tremors typically appear in middle aged to older adults. They affect men and women equally and can run in families.

Tremors can occur on their own or be a symptom associated with a number of neurological disorders, including:

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Stroke
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Parkinson’s disease

Others reasons why someone may experience tremors include: a reaction to medications, alcohol abuse, anxiety disorders, mercury poisoning,  an overactive thyroid, or liver or kidney failure. Some tremors may be triggered by or worsen during times of stress or strong emotion, when an individual is physically exhausted, or when a person is in certain postures or makes certain movements.

Tremors are classified into two main categories, resting or action;  a resting tremor occurs when a person’s hands, arms, or legs shake when they are at rest. Often, the tremor only affects the hand or fingers and is often seen in people with Parkinson’s disease.  An action tremor occurs with the voluntary movement of a muscle. Most types of tremors are considered action tremors.

A neurologist can diagnose a tremor during an physical examination and medical history based on:

  • Whether tremors occur when the muscles are at rest or in action
  • The location of the tremor on the body
  • The frequency and severity of the tremor.

Your doctor will also check for other neurological abnormalities such as impaired balance or speech, or increased muscle stiffness. Blood or urine tests can rule out a thyroid malfunction, medication interaction or alcohol abuse as a cause. A CT Scan or MRI may be performed to determine if the tremor is the result of a brain injury and motor skill assessments can administered to determine functional limitations.

Although there is no cure for most forms of tremors, treatment options are available to help manage symptoms. In some cases, a person’s symptoms may be mild enough that they do not require treatment. In other cases, treating the underlying cause can reduce or eliminate the tremor. If no known cause is determined, medications, focused ultrasound, or surgery may be considered as treatment options.

To make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ringworm

Ringworm- skin doctor queens new yorkRingworm is a common infection that results in circular-shaped rashes on the skin.  Contrary to what its name suggests ringworm is not caused by a worm but rather a fungus that thrives on multiple surfaces.

Ringworm can appear on just about any part of the body.  However, based on the location of the rash, it may be categorized by a different name.  For example, ringworm on the feet is known as athlete’s foot and ringworm on the groin is known as jock itch.

Symptoms of ringworm vary based on location. They can include:

  • Patches of hair loss
  • Scaling of the scalp
  • A small pimple on the scalp that becomes larger in size over time
  • Thickened, discolored or brittle nails
  • Flat-ring shaped rashes
  • Itching
  • Red, peeling, itchy skin between the toes
  • Red spots on the inner sides of the thigh

Ringworm is highly contagious and can be spread by:

  • Skin-to-skin contact with an infected person
  • Contact with an infected animal
  • Contact with objects or surfaces touched by an infected person
  • Prolonged contact with soil that is infected

Some people are more at risk for transmission than others.  Your chances of contracting an infection increases if you:

  • Are in close contact with animals or people who are infected
  • Share linens or clothing with someone who is infected
  • Live in a warm climate
  • Wear tight or restrictive clothing
  • Have a weakened immune system

You can reduce your risk of getting ringworm by:

  • Keeping your skin clean and dry
  • Avoid sharing linens and clothing with an infected person
  • Washing your hands after playing with pets with ringworm

Your doctor can diagnose ringworm by examining the infected area.   You may receive a prescription for antifungal medications that may include lotions, creams or pills to treat the infection. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn the Symptoms of Painful Bladder Syndrome

Interstitial cystitis is a chronic condition causing bladder pressure and pain, with occasional pain extending into the pelvis. The condition is a part of a spectrum of diseases known as painful bladder syndrome.

patient with bladder pain,, which is a urology issue

Interstitial cystitis occurs when your bladder, which is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine, sends premature signals to your brain that you need to urinate. Normally these signals are sent once the bladder is full, but those with interstitial cystitis feel the sensation to urinate more often and produce smaller amounts of urine when they go.

Interstitial cystitis most often affects women and can have a long-lasting impact on quality of life. The symptoms may vary from person to person and they may change over time, periodically flaring in response to common triggers, such as menstruation, sitting for a long time, stress, exercise and sexual activity. In many cases symptoms of interstitial cystitis resemble those of a urinary tract infection.

Interstitial cystitis signs and symptoms include:

  • Pain in your pelvis or between the vagina and anus in women, the scrotum and anus in men
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • A persistent, urgent need to urinate
  • Frequent urination, often of small amounts, throughout the day and night (up to 60 times a day)
  • Pain or discomfort while the bladder fills and relief after urinating
  • Pain during sexual intercourse

The exact cause of interstitial cystitis isn’t known, but it’s likely that many factors contribute. One possible factor is a defect in the protective lining of the bladder which could result in toxic substances in urine to irritate the bladder wall.  Other possible but unproven contributing factors include an autoimmune reaction, genetics, infection or allergy.

Interstitial cystitis can result in a number of complications, including reduced bladder capacity, lower quality of life, sexual intimacy problems, and emotional troubles.

There is no current cure for interstitial cystitis, but there are medications and other therapies available that may offer relief. If you’re experiencing chronic bladder pain or urinary urgency and frequency, contact your doctor.

If you are experiencing symptoms of interstitial cystitis and would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-.5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a Herniated Disk and What Are the Symptoms?

Our spine consists of a series of bones called vertebrae. Separating these vertebrae are cushions filled with a jellylike substance. These cushions allow the spine to bend. When one of these disks starts to slip out of place, it causes a condition called a slipped, ruptured, or herniated disk.

Most herniated discs occur in your lower back (lumbar spine), although they can also occur in your neck (cervical spine). You can suffer a herniated disk and not experience any symptoms, but most people do. The most common symptoms associated with a herniated disk are:

  • Arm or leg pain – If your herniated disk is in your lower back, you’ll typically feel the most intense pain in your buttocks, thigh and calf. If your herniated disk is in your neck, the pain will typically be most intense in the shoulder and arm. This pain may be more intense when you cough, sneeze or move your spine into certain positions.
  • Numbness or tingling – People who have a herniated disk often experience numbness or tingling in the body part served by the affected nerves.
  • Weakness – Muscles served by the affected nerves tend to weaken. This may cause you to stumble, or impair your ability to lift or hold items.

While suffering a herniated disk is most often the result of a natural aging process called disk degeneration, it can sometimes be the result of a traumatic event or improperly lifting heavy objects.

Risk factors for developing a herniated disk include:

  • Excess body weight causes extra stress on the disks in your lower back.
  • People with physically demanding jobs have a greater risk of back problems.
  • Some people inherit a predisposition to developing a herniated disk.

Tips to avoid a herniated disk include exercising, maintaining a healthy weight, lifting heavy objects with your legs and not your back, and practicing good posture.

In many cases, the best treatment for a herniated disk is rest, but if your symptoms are persistent or worsening, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor who may prescribe medications or refer you for physical rehabilitation.

If you are experiencing symptoms associated with a herniated disk and would like to see a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-  5486 to make an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Parsley

If you are like most Americans, you probably think of parsley as just something decorative that gets put on a plate to make a meal look pretty. However, parsley is now known to have many health benefits that many of us don’t know about. Before it became popular as a food, parsley was originally used for medicinal purposes by the ancient Greeks and Romans.

Parsley contains many nutrients. It has vitamins A, K and C, minerals that include magnesium, potassium, folate, iron and calcium. It is also relatively low in calories.

The health benefits of parsley include:

  • Helps treat fatigue, hormone imbalances, liver problems, and menstrual pain,
  • Possesses antioxidant power
  • Promotes kidney cleansing
  • Reduces edema
  • Helps weight loss
  • Helps metabolism
  • Acts as an anti-inflammatory
  • Helps heal scars
  • Reduces toxins in the body
  • Aids digestion
  • Slows tumor growth
  • Helps to prevent osteoporosis
  • Reduces acid formation
  • Has antibacterial and antifungal properties

Consult with a physician before adding parsley in large amounts to the diet. People who are pregnant, have a tendency to form kidney stones, or susceptible to a rash should be cautious when eating it. You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5486 to discuss if parsley is good for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.