World No Tobacco Day

Since 1987 the World Health Organization has recognized May 31st as a day to bring awareness around the world of the harmful effects of tobacco.

The risks of using tobacco are well documented, however many people around the world are not fully aware of the dangers.  There is a very strong link between tobacco use and heart disease, circulatory problems, and stroke.

Coronary vascular diseases are one of the world’s leading causes of death.  Tobacco use is the second leading cause of these types of diseases, hypertension being the leading cause.

With all of the knowledge we have about the harmful effects of tobacco use, there are still some who have not received the message and as a result, more than 7 million people die each year from the effects of tobacco.

A few of the initiatives that the World Health Organization is trying to implement to inform people about tobacco’s harmful effects are:
• Increase public knowledge of the risks of smoking and secondhand smoke
• Encourage healthcare providers to speak to their patients about the hazards of tobacco
• Encourage governmental  support for educational programs
• Seek ways to promote smoke-free zones in buildings and public spaces
• Increase taxes on tobacco products
• Make it more difficult to purchase tobacco products
• Ban tobacco advertising

If you are interested in quitting smoking, you can contact the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Smoking Cessation Navigators. Call 718-670-3146 for more information.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Offers Tips To Enjoy a Happy and Safe Memorial Day

Memorial Day is the unofficial start of Summer for many.  Whether you are planning a weekend road trip, firing up the grill, or heading out on the water, Flushing Hospital Medical Center wants you to have a fun and safe holiday weekend by following some of these simple safety tips.

Driving Safety Tips:

  • Don’t follow other vehicles too closely and use caution in construction zones.
  • Be sure to make frequent stops and use multiple drivers if necessary.
  • Ensure that your vehicle’s gas tank doesn’t get too low.
  • Let someone know where you’re going before you leave.
  • Avoid distractions such as cell phones, and always buckle your seatbelt

Backyard Barbeque Tips:

  • Keep your grill out in the open and away from overhangs, enclosed areas, or anything that could catch fire.
  • Make sure that no one gets too close to the grill, such as children or pets.
  • Use long-handled tools as to avoid any burns.
  • Never add starter fluid if your coals have already been lit.

Water Safety Tips:

  • Learn CPR in case of an emergency and ensure that all swimmers are skilled.
  • Actively supervise children and stay within arms-reach of new swimmers.
  • If you’re on a boat, wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • Remain within eyeshot of a lifeguard and swim with a buddy.
  • Keep a life preserver nearby, and in case of drowning, throw it, but don’t jump in.

By following these tips, you can ensure not only just a fun Memorial Day weekend, but a safe Summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Pedro Degante

This month we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Pedro Degante, mailroom coordinator. Pedro has been working at Flushing Hospital Medical Center for 13 years and is a very familiar face around the hospital.

Pedro is a native of Brooklyn, New York. He grew up in the Williamsburgh section of the borough and currently resides in the Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood. He attended Eastern District High School. and Washington Irving High School.  Pedro then went on to attend the Borough of Manhattan Community College.

In his free time, Pedro likes to ride his bicycle around the city, especially on the West Side Highway in Manhattan. He enjoys listening to different types of music, especially dance music. He also enjoys going to the beach at Coney Island in nice weather. Pedro enjoys all types of food, his favorite dishes are shrimp parmigiana and lobster. His family is very important to him and he enjoys visiting his relatives  that live in North Carolina. Baseball and basketball are the two sports that he enjoys playing when he gets the opportunity.

Pedro likes working at Flushing Hospital because the people are all supportive of one another. It is a great place to come to every day. We are very happy to have Pedro as a member of our team and we look forward to him working with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Now Offering Podcasts To Our Community

Podcasts have become an increasingly popular medium to distribute information about a variety of topics. Millions of people listen to them to learn about many things including politics, entertainment, sports, and health. For this reason, Flushing Hospital has begun producing and distributing podcasts to help members of our community learn how to better manage their health as well as how our hospital can provide valuable services to assist them.

The podcast which is named Flushing Hospital MedTalk began production earlier this year. Each episode is approximately 15-minutes-long and features providers from various medical specialties discussing a wide range of topics.

The podcasts can be found on multiple podcast platforms including Apple, Google, IHeart Radio, Spotify, Stitcher and others.  In addition, those interested can listen to or download the podcasts on the hospital’s website. Episodes are also being shared on our social media platforms, including Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Flushing Hospital is dedicated to providing important information about health and wellness to our community. We are excited to utilize our podcasts as a new way to engage everyone.

To listen to any of the Flushing Hospital podcasts, please click the link below:

https://flushinghospital.org/podcast/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learning The Facts About Aphasia

Aphasia is a neurological condition that can affect your speech, as well as your ability to write and understand both spoken and written language.

Aphasia typically occurs after a stroke or a head injury, but it can also have a gradual onset as the result of a slow-growing brain tumor or a disease that causes degenerative damage. Sometimes temporary episodes of aphasia can occur. These can be due to migraines, seizures or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). A TIA occurs when blood flow is temporarily blocked to an area of the brain.

The severity of aphasia varies depending on the cause and the extent of the brain damage.

Some of the symptoms of aphasia include:

  • Speaking in short or incomplete sentences
  • Speaking in sentences that don’t make sense
  • Substituting one word for another or one sound for another
  • Using unrecognizable words
  • Not understanding conversations
  • Writing sentences that don’t make sense

Aphasia can create numerous quality-of-life problems because communication is so much a part of your life. Communication difficulty may affect your job, relationships, and general day-to-day functionality.  Communication difficulties can also lead to feelings of shame and depression.

Once the cause has been addressed, the main treatment for aphasia is speech and language therapy. The person with aphasia relearns and practices language skills and learns to use other ways to communicate. Family members often participate in the process, helping the person communicate.

Because aphasia is often a sign of a serious problem, such as a stroke, seek emergency medical care if you suddenly develop any symptoms.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Community Health Needs Assessment Survey

In collaboration with hospitals across the state, the MediSys Health Network (Jamaica and Flushing Hospital Medical Center) is conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment survey to determine the most important health concerns of the community, and we would greatly appreciate your input.

The Community Health Needs Assessment survey will assist in the development of a plan that involves many community partners to improve the health of our community. The results of this survey are very important as they can also impact funding, spending, and other wide-reaching decisions about healthcare delivery systems.

The survey is open to all community members residing in New York. To access it, please click here, and share what issues matter to you most.  Please share the survey with family, friends, and others so that their input can be heard. All responses are confidential.

Thank you for your time and for helping us gain valuable insights into the needs of the community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

May is National Osteoporosis Awareness Month

Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens the bones, making them more susceptible to breaking. Approximately 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and another 44 million have an increased risk due to poor bone density. In fact, one in two women over 50 years of age will develop osteoporosis  and one in four men will too.

To raise awareness about this disease, May has been designated as National Osteoporosis Month by the Bone Health and Osteoporosis Foundation (BHOF).

According to the BHOF, one of the ways to combat osteoporosis is through bone-strengthening exercise. Additional diet and lifestyle recommendations for maintaining bone strength are:

  • Getting plenty of calcium and vitamin D in your diet
  • Quitting smoking and limiting alcohol consumption

To schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center to discuss osteoporosis, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs of Potential Liver Disease

The liver plays an essential role in helping our bodies to digest food, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, manage the clotting of blood, and remove harmful chemicals from the blood.

When our liver is damaged or not functioning properly it can lead to complications such as liver disease, which can potentially become life-threatening.

People with early-stage liver damage or disease may not experience symptoms. However, as time progresses, the body may send warning signs to let us know that the liver is not working the way it should.

Paying attention to these signs and receiving timely treatment can reduce the risk of serious illnesses. Here are five signs you should not ignore:

  1. Itchy skin
  2. Jaundice (Yellowing of the skin and eyes)
  3. Edema (Swelling in the arms and legs)
  4. Bruising easily
  5. Nausea and vomiting

Treatment for liver disease may include medications, lifestyle changes, or in some cases, liver transplantation.

There are steps you can take to prevent certain types of liver disease. This includes eating less red meat, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting or avoiding the consumption of alcohol, exercising, and getting the hepatitis  A and B vaccine if you are at risk.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn The Facts About Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that affects the cells in your body that make mucus.  CF occurs when there is a mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The mutation disables cells from moving chloride (a component of salt) to their surfaces.  Without the movement of chloride, cells cannot hydrate properly.  This leads to the production of mucus that is thicker and stickier than normal.

CF can result in damage to the digestive system, lungs, and other organs that utilize mucus to function.  The buildup of mucus can obstruct the ducts, tubes or passageways of these organs.

Those living with cystic fibrosis often have abnormally high levels of salt in their sweat.  Other complications or symptoms that may develop as a result of the disease include:

  • Frequent lung infections, including recurrent  pneumonia or bronchitis
  • Persistent cough with thick mucus
  • Frequent sinus infections
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nasal polyps
  • Fatigue
  • Delayed growth or puberty
  • Poor weight gain
  • Bowel movements of greasy bulky stools
  • Severe constipation
  • Male infertility

All babies born in the United States are screened for cystic fibrosis by testing small blood samples. In other cases, if someone is suspected to have CF, their doctor can order a sweat test to determine if chloride levels are normal.

Currently, there is no cure for CF. However; treatment is focused on alleviating symptoms and reducing complications. Treatment may include medications, physical therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, or surgery.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Hand Hygiene Day 2022

May 5th has been designated as World Hand Hygiene Day by the World Health Organization (WHO). The slogan for this year’s campaign is “Unite for safety: clean your hands.” This year’s theme focuses on  recognizing that we can all contribute to healthcare facility’s culture of safety and quality by cleaning our hands.

Practicing good hand hygiene helps with infection prevention and control. This is why the WHO is encouraging people to clean their hands at the right time and with the right products. Furthermore, healthcare workers at all levels and all others who visit healthcare facilities must unite by cleaning their hands, not just on World Hand Hygiene Day, but every day.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.