Flushing Hospital’s Dr. Chad P. Gehani Elected President of The American Dental Association

Photo Courtesy of Dr. Chad Gehani

Founded in 1859, the American Dental Association (ADA) is our nation’s oldest and largest dental association.  For more than 150 years the organization has been known nationally and internationally as the leading resource on all things related to oral health. Many of the oral care guidelines we are familiar with today were established by the American Dental Association and hundreds of dental care products that we use boast the ADA’s Seal of Acceptance as a symbol of quality assurance.

Recently chosen to lead this globally recognized and influential American institution is Queen’s own Dr. Chad P. Gehani, Chair of Endodontics at Flushing Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Gehani was elected as the 156th President of the American Dental Association in September.

Becoming President of the ADA once seemed like a dream that Dr. Gehani was uncertain would come true.  In an interview in ADA News, he recalled a conversation he had with his father many years ago, “I called my father and said, ‘I’m now an American citizen and now a member of the ADA.’ He was very proud and actually said to me, ‘I want to see you as president of that association.’ And of course, in my mind, that was not doable for me so I just laughed at him. That was not in my cards.”   His father’s unwavering faith in his son’s abilities provided the motivation needed to help Dr. Gehani realize this dream could become a reality.

As President, Dr. Gehani often describes his role as a servant-leader.   He will lead the close to 200,000 members of the ADA while advocating for patients’ rights to access quality oral healthcare- especially those living in communities that are underserved.   Dr. Gehani aims to improve patient outcomes and provide the guidance needed to help them make informed decisions about their treatment options.

In addition to his role as President of the ADA, Dr. Gehani continues to serve as a mentor to dental residents at Flushing Hospital where he has worked for over two decades.  As Chair of Endodontics, he focuses on offering high-quality dental services to patients and providing resources to benefit the community.   His devotion to bettering the communities he serves has earned him the Ellis Island Medal of Honor- presented to individuals who exemplify a life dedicated to community service.

“We are proud to have Dr. Gehani as Chair of Endodontics at Flushing Hospital and just as proud that he has been elected President of the American Dental Association.  Dr.  Gehani abides by a strict code of ethics which is reflected in the work that he does.  He is very community-oriented which is the culture promoted here at our hospital,” said Mr. Robert Levine, Executive Vice President and COO of Flushing Hospital.

Each year, Flushing Hospital collaborates with the American Dental Association to promote the Give Kids a Smile Program, providing a day of free preventative dental care to children in the community.   The hospital’s dental department also offers free dental screenings, oral cancer screenings, and oral health education in schools, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and several local organizations.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Patricia Czyzak, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Patricia:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I’ve worked at Flushing Hospital for the past 42 years after graduating from the Flushing Hospital School of Nursing

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A:  I’ve worked in the Operating Room for my entire career here.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  My decision to become a nurse was due to my sister Mary Ellin, who is also a Flushing Hospital OR nurse for the past 49 years (  She’s still here).

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A: The best part of my job is the people that I work with and the satisfaction at the end of the day that the patients are happy with the care we provide.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Receives Healthgrades 2019 Women’s Care Excellence Awards

Healthgrades, a leading online resource for information about physicians and hospitals, recently revealed its list of recipients for their 2019 Women’s Care Excellence Awards – and Flushing Hospital Medical Center is among the privileged and few recipients.

These awards recognize hospitals across the nation that demonstrate exceptional outcomes and excel in women’s healthcare services. The awards were broken down into three separate categories, including:

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology Excellence Award – This award highlights hospitals for exceptional clinical outcomes while caring for women in childbirth, as well as during and after gynecologic surgeries and procedures.
  • Labor and Delivery Excellence Award – This distinction recognizes the top 10 % of all hospitals evaluated for the exceptional care provided to mothers during and after labor and delivery.
  • Gynecologic Surgery Excellence Award – This award recognizes the top 10% of hospitals evaluated that provided outstanding performance in gynecologic surgery, including hysterectomy and surgery related to the female reproductive system.

Flushing Hospital received all three awards and was the only hospital in Queens to receive the Gynecologic Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology Excellence awards.

According to Maria Smilios, Director of Nursing, “Flushing Hospital has done many things that have contributed to earning these awards, including creating standards to prevent inducing labor before 39 weeks gestation to reduce the chances of complications at birth.” Maria added that “providing our patients with continuity of care throughout their pregnancy and stressing the importance of maintaining proper prenatal care have also been major factors in our success.”  Other reasons to cite the hospital receiving these accolades include having dedicated gynecologists and gyn specialists on staff, as well as the addition of the daVinci robotic surgical system,  which has improved gynecological surgical outcomes for Flushing Hospital patients.

Approximately 3,000 babies are delivered at Flushing Hospital every year. The gynecology division performed over 1,500 procedures in 2018 and the hospital’s Women’s Health Center had nearly 14,000 outpatient visits last year.

“We are honored to receive these awards” stated Dr. Hajoon Chun, Chairman of Ob/Gyn at Flushing Hospital Medical Center. “It signifies the hospital’s dedication to providing the highest quality care to women in our community and is another example of why Flushing Hospital is the hospital of choice for so many seeking obstetrical and gynecological care.”

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs Your Child May Be A Victim of Bullying

Signs of  BullyingMany children will not tell parents they are being bullied until the situation escalates, but there a few changes in their behavior that can alert you.

Signs that your child may be a victim of bullying include refusing to speak about their day at school, not wanting to go to school, unexplained marks and bruises, asking for more lunch money, complaining of frequent headaches and stomach aches, sudden loss of friends and frequent nightmares.

Bullying has profound effects on children. For some, it affects them for life. Psychological responses can range from depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder to severe reactive rage leading to the victim being the perpetrator of cruelty to others. In some instances, children have responded to bullying and cyber-bullying by committing suicide.

If you find that your child is being bullied, you will need to document the dates, times and places of the action. If the bullying is taking place on school grounds, call the school and schedule a face to face meeting with a teacher or principal. If not on school grounds, notify the police.

Most schools have adopted an anti-bullying policy. Obtain a copy to determine if the bully violated school law. Bullying is best handled when you work together, with the proper authorities.

After notification, be sure to follow up with your child, and the school, to make sure that the bullying has stopped.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Helen Santos, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Helen:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working at Flushing Hospital since 1993.

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Currently, I work in the Emergency Department but I used to work in ICU.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  Being a nurse is a family tradition. It is an occupation in which I take great pride.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  I love my job!  What I enjoy most is interacting with my patients and helping them through what can be a frightening time.  I work hard to make them feel comfortable.  I want them to know they are well cared for.  I am grateful that I am part of a team that feels the same way I do.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Winsome “Winnie” Kpana, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Winnie:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working in Flushing Hospital for 38 and a half years

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: I work in The Women’s Health Center.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:   In looking back, I’ve come to realize that my passion to become a nurse started in my early childhood. I grew up in a small rural community where there were only one doctor and one nurse. I was always fascinated by the nurse as she visited my school or as I visited the health clinic. She was always smiling, caring and patient as she cared for my bruises and cuts or as she administered a vaccine. I knew then, that one day, I too would become a nurse because I wanted to be ” Just Like Her”. I chose a career that is challenging, exciting and interesting. Being a nurse has allowed me to fulfill my life’s desires and  I strive to make a difference in the lives of my patients.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The best part of my job starts with caring for and helping others. I worked as a pediatric nurse for over 33 years. I saw children at their best and at the worst. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing the smiling face of a child who has recovered from a serious illness or a traumatic experience. It is also very humbling to know that my nursing care contributed to that child’s recovery. Over the past six years, I have switched course and I am working in an ambulatory setting, The Women’s Health Center, where I offer service to the OB/GYN patients. Education is the key to success and as an ambulatory nurse, I am always teaching women how to care for themselves and their unborn child. There are times when I feel not only as a nurse but as an extension of a patient’s family. We share in the joy of welcoming a newborn baby. For me, This is nursing at its best.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Do You Treat a Bloody Nose?

How to treat a nose bleedMost of us have suffered a nose bleed at some point in our life, and many have often wondered “what is the reason?”

Our noses contain many blood vessels that help warm and humidify the air we breathe. These vessels are easily damaged or injured because they lie on the interior surface of our nose. When they get injured, the result is often a bloody nose.

Thankfully, in most instances, nosebleeds aren’t serious and they can be treated quickly and easily at home. When one occurs, you should follow these simple tips:

  • Remain calm – Getting nervous can actually make you bleed more
  • Sit upright – You nose will stop bleeding quicker if you keep your head above your heart
  • Lean forward. This will prevent blood from draining down the back of your throat
  • Pinch your nostrils closed. Press your thumb and index finger over your nostrils for approximately 10 minutes and breathe through your mouth. The pressure will make the blood stop flowing.

Once the bleeding has stopped, do not touch or blow your nose as it may start to bleed again. If it does, blow your nose to get rid of any blood clots. You can also spray a nasal decongestant in your nostrils and pinch them closed again.

Although you can’t always prevent a nosebleed, there are some things you can do to reduce the chances of getting one, such as:

  • Keep your nose moist – Dryness can cause nosebleeds. Swab a thin layer petroleum jelly inside your nostrils three times a day, including before going to bed.
  • Use saline spray – Spraying saline in your nostrils helps keep the inside of your nose moist.
  • Use a humidifier – Especially during the winter when the air is most dry
  • Don’t smoke – This can irritate the inside of your nose and dry it out.
  • Don’t agitate your nose – Placing your fingers inside your nose to scratch or pick it . Also avoid blowing your nose too hard as these actions can damage the blood vessels.
  • Avoid cold and allergy medications – They can dry out your nose. In some cases, certain medications can cause or intensify nosebleeds.

While the majority of nosebleeds are not cause for concern, you should see your doctor if the following take place:

  • The bleeding goes on for more than 20 minutes.
  • The bleeding was caused by an injury, such as a fall or something hitting your face.
  • You get nosebleeds often

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of the Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Chenfei Huang RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Chenfei:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I started working at Flushing September of 2015. Initially started on telemetry 3N2, and later transitioned to ICU

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: ICU: MICU, SICU, CCU

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  The increasing diversity of the population in the metro area. The need for nurses with cultural awareness and understanding of specific population groups. I have an appreciation for the complexity of medical conditions. Lastly,  patients are living longer, I want to ensure that our population will receive the very best healthcare for years to come.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The ability to advocate for patients. In ICU, many patients are so sick that they are unable to speak up. Nurses are the voice of the patients. The gratitude you receive from patients is priceless.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Advocates for Healthy Mothers and Newborns

breastfeeding program flushing queensThe Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS)  highlights the many ways its member hospitals and health systems are transforming healthcare with their “Innovation Spotlight” campaign. Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) is proud to have been highlighted as an “Innovator” in advocating for healthy mothers and newborns.

In 2015, the hospital began a community-based program, Breastfeeding and Beyond: Breastfeeding Education and Nutrition in the Community.  According to HANYS, “FHMC works with partners in the community — including the New York City Public Library and Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children — to improve health and promote the well-being of women, newborns, infants, toddlers and children.”

“Over the past three years,  Flushing Hospital’s exclusive breastfeeding rates increased from 6%  to 30%. More than 375 women with their children and families have been educated both prenatally and after birth. The intent to breastfeed upon admission to the hospital increased from 50% in 2015 to 96% in 2018 and upon discharge from the hospital it rose from 29% in 2015 to 88% in 2018.” stated Maria D. Smilios, Director, Nursing-Maternal and Child Services.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Receives New 3T MRI Scanner

The Radiology Department at Flushing Hospital offers a wide variety of advanced, state-of-the-art diagnostic and imaging services to its patients. One of the ways they are able to do this is by offering the latest and most advanced imaging technology.

Through the acquisition of the Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra 3T MRI scanner, Flushing Hospital now provides one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced machines in healthcare.

Like Flushing’s previous MRI machine, the new model features an open-bore design, with an extra wide patient tube to accommodate larger patients. The larger size also increases comfort levels and decrease feelings of claustrophobia for all patients. The open-bore feature results in fewer patients requiring sedation and provides overall higher patient satisfaction.

Another benefit of the new MAGNETOM Skyra is its advanced imaging capabilities. Equipped with a 3T magnet, it provides the most accurate, high-resolution images and delivers them in less time. The Zero Helium boil-off feature and the Green Cooling package also make the new MRI machine more environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

This new technology compliments Flushing Hospital’s team of Board Certified and fellowship-trained radiologists and highly-trained, experienced technologists. The department is fully accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), which signifies a higher quality examination and care.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.