Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Winsome “Winnie” Kpana, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Winnie:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working in Flushing Hospital for 38 and a half years

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: I work in The Women’s Health Center.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:   In looking back, I’ve come to realize that my passion to become a nurse started in my early childhood. I grew up in a small rural community where there were only one doctor and one nurse. I was always fascinated by the nurse as she visited my school or as I visited the health clinic. She was always smiling, caring and patient as she cared for my bruises and cuts or as she administered a vaccine. I knew then, that one day, I too would become a nurse because I wanted to be ” Just Like Her”. I chose a career that is challenging, exciting and interesting. Being a nurse has allowed me to fulfill my life’s desires and  I strive to make a difference in the lives of my patients.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The best part of my job starts with caring for and helping others. I worked as a pediatric nurse for over 33 years. I saw children at their best and at the worst. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing the smiling face of a child who has recovered from a serious illness or a traumatic experience. It is also very humbling to know that my nursing care contributed to that child’s recovery. Over the past six years, I have switched course and I am working in an ambulatory setting, The Women’s Health Center, where I offer service to the OB/GYN patients. Education is the key to success and as an ambulatory nurse, I am always teaching women how to care for themselves and their unborn child. There are times when I feel not only as a nurse but as an extension of a patient’s family. We share in the joy of welcoming a newborn baby. For me, This is nursing at its best.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Do You Treat a Bloody Nose?

How to treat a nose bleedMost of us have suffered a nose bleed at some point in our life, and many have often wondered “what is the reason?”

Our noses contain many blood vessels that help warm and humidify the air we breathe. These vessels are easily damaged or injured because they lie on the interior surface of our nose. When they get injured, the result is often a bloody nose.

Thankfully, in most instances, nosebleeds aren’t serious and they can be treated quickly and easily at home. When one occurs, you should follow these simple tips:

  • Remain calm – Getting nervous can actually make you bleed more
  • Sit upright – You nose will stop bleeding quicker if you keep your head above your heart
  • Lean forward. This will prevent blood from draining down the back of your throat
  • Pinch your nostrils closed. Press your thumb and index finger over your nostrils for approximately 10 minutes and breathe through your mouth. The pressure will make the blood stop flowing.

Once the bleeding has stopped, do not touch or blow your nose as it may start to bleed again. If it does, blow your nose to get rid of any blood clots. You can also spray a nasal decongestant in your nostrils and pinch them closed again.

Although you can’t always prevent a nosebleed, there are some things you can do to reduce the chances of getting one, such as:

  • Keep your nose moist – Dryness can cause nosebleeds. Swab a thin layer petroleum jelly inside your nostrils three times a day, including before going to bed.
  • Use saline spray – Spraying saline in your nostrils helps keep the inside of your nose moist.
  • Use a humidifier – Especially during the winter when the air is most dry
  • Don’t smoke – This can irritate the inside of your nose and dry it out.
  • Don’t agitate your nose – Placing your fingers inside your nose to scratch or pick it . Also avoid blowing your nose too hard as these actions can damage the blood vessels.
  • Avoid cold and allergy medications – They can dry out your nose. In some cases, certain medications can cause or intensify nosebleeds.

While the majority of nosebleeds are not cause for concern, you should see your doctor if the following take place:

  • The bleeding goes on for more than 20 minutes.
  • The bleeding was caused by an injury, such as a fall or something hitting your face.
  • You get nosebleeds often

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of the Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Chenfei Huang RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Chenfei:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I started working at Flushing September of 2015. Initially started on telemetry 3N2, and later transitioned to ICU

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: ICU: MICU, SICU, CCU

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  The increasing diversity of the population in the metro area. The need for nurses with cultural awareness and understanding of specific population groups. I have an appreciation for the complexity of medical conditions. Lastly,  patients are living longer, I want to ensure that our population will receive the very best healthcare for years to come.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The ability to advocate for patients. In ICU, many patients are so sick that they are unable to speak up. Nurses are the voice of the patients. The gratitude you receive from patients is priceless.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Advocates for Healthy Mothers and Newborns

breastfeeding program flushing queensThe Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS)  highlights the many ways its member hospitals and health systems are transforming healthcare with their “Innovation Spotlight” campaign. Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) is proud to have been highlighted as an “Innovator” in advocating for healthy mothers and newborns.

In 2015, the hospital began a community-based program, Breastfeeding and Beyond: Breastfeeding Education and Nutrition in the Community.  According to HANYS, “FHMC works with partners in the community — including the New York City Public Library and Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children — to improve health and promote the well-being of women, newborns, infants, toddlers and children.”

“Over the past three years,  Flushing Hospital’s exclusive breastfeeding rates increased from 6%  to 30%. More than 375 women with their children and families have been educated both prenatally and after birth. The intent to breastfeed upon admission to the hospital increased from 50% in 2015 to 96% in 2018 and upon discharge from the hospital it rose from 29% in 2015 to 88% in 2018.” stated Maria D. Smilios, Director, Nursing-Maternal and Child Services.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Receives New 3T MRI Scanner

The Radiology Department at Flushing Hospital offers a wide variety of advanced, state-of-the-art diagnostic and imaging services to its patients. One of the ways they are able to do this is by offering the latest and most advanced imaging technology.

Through the acquisition of the Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra 3T MRI scanner, Flushing Hospital now provides one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced machines in healthcare.

Like Flushing’s previous MRI machine, the new model features an open-bore design, with an extra wide patient tube to accommodate larger patients. The larger size also increases comfort levels and decrease feelings of claustrophobia for all patients. The open-bore feature results in fewer patients requiring sedation and provides overall higher patient satisfaction.

Another benefit of the new MAGNETOM Skyra is its advanced imaging capabilities. Equipped with a 3T magnet, it provides the most accurate, high-resolution images and delivers them in less time. The Zero Helium boil-off feature and the Green Cooling package also make the new MRI machine more environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

This new technology compliments Flushing Hospital’s team of Board Certified and fellowship-trained radiologists and highly-trained, experienced technologists. The department is fully accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), which signifies a higher quality examination and care.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition characterized by reddening and the appearance of blood vessels on the face.  Rosacea can also cause red bumps containing pus to develop as well as redness of the eyes and thickening of the skin on the nose- causing it to appear bigger than it really is.

Currently, there are approximately 14 million people living with rosacea in the United States.  While the condition can affect anyone, it is most likely to occur in:

  • Women more than men
  • People between the ages of 30 and 50
  • Those with a family history of rosacea
  • Those who had acne when they were younger
  • Those with fair skin, blue eyes and blond hair
  • Smokers

The causes of rosacea are unknown; however, there are indications that suggest symptoms may present as the result of an immune response, intestinal bacteria (H. pylori), a mite found in nature or a protein in the skin that is not functioning properly.

There are triggers that can cause a flare-up of rosacea, they include: being overheated, eating spicy foods, drinking hot liquids or alcoholic beverages, strong or sudden emotions, cosmetics, medications for blood pressure, sunlight, or having cold wind blowing on the face.

There aren’t any specific tests for rosacea, but doctors will want to rule out lupus and an allergic reaction.  Depending on the severity, there are a few ways to alleviate symptoms of rosacea. These include:

  • Avoiding triggers
  • Protecting the skin from strong sunlight by applying sunscreen or wearing protective clothing
  • Using mild soap and skin cream
  • Taking medications that help tighten the blood vessels
  • Undergoing laser treatments
  • Getting dermabrasion

If you are experiencing symptoms of rosacea, it is important that you see a physician to get an accurate diagnosis and start a treatment plan.  If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486,

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Eileen Flores  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Eileen:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:   I started as a student at Flushing’s nursing school in 1976. I graduated as an RN in 1979 and have worked here since.

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: The name of the department I work in is PACU. I worked in PACU since 1988. My present position is Assistant Head Nurse.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  I decided to become a nurse when my youngest brother was admitted to the hospital. I saw the care he was given and how it made a difference. I wanted to be able to do the same.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Working in a place that treats everyone like family.  I have taken care of so many people during my time at Flushing Hospital.  We have seen many children grow up and have families of their own, which we also take care of. I take pride in our sense of community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Guacamole Recipe

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Clinical Nutritional Manager, Jessica Hyman RD, CDN- is sharing one of her favorite, healthy Guacamole Recipes:

Healthy Guacamole recipeINGREDIENTS: Serves 8
4 Ripe avocados
1 Lime, juiced
3 Tbsp. Onion, finely minced
1 Serrano chili, thinly sliced (or seeded and diced to lessen the heat)
1 Clove garlic, finely minced
2 Tbsp. Cilantro, finely chopped (optional)
1 Tomato, medium 1/4 inch dice

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. In a medium bowl, mash avocado with lime, onion, chile, garlic, and cilantro (optional) until the guacamole is mostly smooth only small chunks of avocado remain.
2. Stir in tomatoes, gently (so they don’t get smooshed!)

Serve with warm corn tortillas instead of chips!

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories 120
Total Fat 11 g
Chol 0 mg
Potassium 397 mg
Total Carbohydrates 7 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g

Includes Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and Calcium
Why this recipe is so great: Most of the fats from avocado are monounsaturated fats, which are the fats that are known as “Healthy Fats.” These can help lower “Bad Cholesterol” levels, helping to reduce incidence of heart disease and stroke.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is it Okay to Request a Second Opinion From Your Doctor?

Receiving news that you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a serious or rare medical condition can be very overwhelming and scary. While it is important to listen to and follow your doctor’s instructions, it is also appropriate in these situations to seek the advice of other professionals and request a second opinion.

Unfortunately, less than half of the people diagnosed with a serious or life-threatening disease request a second opinion. The most frequent reasons individuals cited for not doing so include: feeling an urgency to seek treatment right away, lack of access to experts or centers of excellence, fear that their insurance carrier would not cover the cost, and concerns about offending their doctor.

In most cases, these reasons are unmerited; in reality, many conditions do not require immediate treatment and most physicians welcome a second opinion. In addition, many insurance providers allow for second opinions and can even help identify local experts that participate in your plan.

So, when is getting a second opinion a good idea? According to WebMD, the following circumstances are appropriate:

  • Where the treatment is very risky or toxic
  • Where the diagnosis is not clear, the treatment is experimental, or there is no established consensus or Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment
  • If you’re considering participating in a trial for a new drug
  • If you’re considering some new experimental approach or a procedure that involves using experimental instruments or devices.

In many cases, second opinions are very beneficial.  In fact, a recent study highlighted their potential value.  Researchers found  that as many as 88% of those who sought a second opinion for a complex medical condition had a new diagnosis that changed their treatment plan, and 21% received a completely different diagnosis.

If you would like to seek a second opinion, but are unsure of how to start the conversation with your doctor, try some of these tips.

  • Tell your doctor you want to be sure that you explore all your treatment options. This may include looking into several surgical and non-surgical interventions.
  • Let your doctor know that you always talk to more than one expert when you need to make an important decision, whether it’s a medical, financial, or personal decision.
  • Explain to your doctor that a second opinion would give you peace of mind that your diagnosis and treatment plan are the best option for you.

Even if a second opinion doesn’t change your diagnosis or treatment plan, you can feel satisfied that you made a well-informed decision.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Free Core Strengthening and Circulation Classes At Flushing Hospital

In an effort to improve the overall wellness of our surrounding community and employees, Flushing Hospital Medical Center has partnered with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation’s, Shape Up NYC, to offer free core strengthening and circulation classes to everyone.

Leading the class is Jordan, a trained specialist in fitness who knows how to make exercise enjoyable for everyone.

According to Shape Up NYC, “this class includes core strengthening and circulation techniques to improve balance and improve intestinal health, dynamic and static stretching, calisthenics and plyometric bodyweight strengthening, Cardiovascular exercises, core-focused breathing postures to slow the mind and for a stronger body, and meditation.”

Class began on March 5th and will take place every Tuesday at 5:00 pm at the 5th Fl. Auditorium/Conference Room A, corner of 45th Avenue and Burling Street.

You can sign up at the time of attendance and please bring your own mat.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.