Flushing Hospital Medical Center Receives New 3T MRI Scanner

The Radiology Department at Flushing Hospital offers a wide variety of advanced, state-of-the-art diagnostic and imaging services to its patients. One of the ways they are able to do this is by offering the latest and most advanced imaging technology.

Through the acquisition of the Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra 3T MRI scanner, Flushing Hospital now provides one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced machines in healthcare.

Like Flushing’s previous MRI machine, the new model features an open-bore design, with an extra wide patient tube to accommodate larger patients. The larger size also increases comfort levels and decrease feelings of claustrophobia for all patients. The open-bore feature results in fewer patients requiring sedation and provides overall higher patient satisfaction.

Another benefit of the new MAGNETOM Skyra is its advanced imaging capabilities. Equipped with a 3T magnet, it provides the most accurate, high-resolution images and delivers them in less time. The Zero Helium boil-off feature and the Green Cooling package also make the new MRI machine more environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

This new technology compliments Flushing Hospital’s team of Board Certified and fellowship-trained radiologists and highly-trained, experienced technologists. The department is fully accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), which signifies a higher quality examination and care.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition characterized by reddening and the appearance of blood vessels on the face.  Rosacea can also cause red bumps containing pus to develop as well as redness of the eyes and thickening of the skin on the nose- causing it to appear bigger than it really is.

Currently, there are approximately 14 million people living with rosacea in the United States.  While the condition can affect anyone, it is most likely to occur in:

  • Women more than men
  • People between the ages of 30 and 50
  • Those with a family history of rosacea
  • Those who had acne when they were younger
  • Those with fair skin, blue eyes and blond hair
  • Smokers

The causes of rosacea are unknown; however, there are indications that suggest symptoms may present as the result of an immune response, intestinal bacteria (H. pylori), a mite found in nature or a protein in the skin that is not functioning properly.

There are triggers that can cause a flare-up of rosacea, they include: being overheated, eating spicy foods, drinking hot liquids or alcoholic beverages, strong or sudden emotions, cosmetics, medications for blood pressure, sunlight, or having cold wind blowing on the face.

There aren’t any specific tests for rosacea, but doctors will want to rule out lupus and an allergic reaction.  Depending on the severity, there are a few ways to alleviate symptoms of rosacea. These include:

  • Avoiding triggers
  • Protecting the skin from strong sunlight by applying sunscreen or wearing protective clothing
  • Using mild soap and skin cream
  • Taking medications that help tighten the blood vessels
  • Undergoing laser treatments
  • Getting dermabrasion

If you are experiencing symptoms of rosacea, it is important that you see a physician to get an accurate diagnosis and start a treatment plan.  If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486,

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Eileen Flores  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Eileen:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:   I started as a student at Flushing’s nursing school in 1976. I graduated as an RN in 1979 and have worked here since.

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: The name of the department I work in is PACU. I worked in PACU since 1988. My present position is Assistant Head Nurse.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  I decided to become a nurse when my youngest brother was admitted to the hospital. I saw the care he was given and how it made a difference. I wanted to be able to do the same.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Working in a place that treats everyone like family.  I have taken care of so many people during my time at Flushing Hospital.  We have seen many children grow up and have families of their own, which we also take care of. I take pride in our sense of community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Guacamole Recipe

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Clinical Nutritional Manager, Jessica Hyman RD, CDN- is sharing one of her favorite, healthy Guacamole Recipes:

Healthy Guacamole recipeINGREDIENTS: Serves 8
4 Ripe avocados
1 Lime, juiced
3 Tbsp. Onion, finely minced
1 Serrano chili, thinly sliced (or seeded and diced to lessen the heat)
1 Clove garlic, finely minced
2 Tbsp. Cilantro, finely chopped (optional)
1 Tomato, medium 1/4 inch dice

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. In a medium bowl, mash avocado with lime, onion, chile, garlic, and cilantro (optional) until the guacamole is mostly smooth only small chunks of avocado remain.
2. Stir in tomatoes, gently (so they don’t get smooshed!)

Serve with warm corn tortillas instead of chips!

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories 120
Total Fat 11 g
Chol 0 mg
Potassium 397 mg
Total Carbohydrates 7 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g

Includes Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and Calcium
Why this recipe is so great: Most of the fats from avocado are monounsaturated fats, which are the fats that are known as “Healthy Fats.” These can help lower “Bad Cholesterol” levels, helping to reduce incidence of heart disease and stroke.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is it Okay to Request a Second Opinion From Your Doctor?

Receiving news that you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a serious or rare medical condition can be very overwhelming and scary. While it is important to listen to and follow your doctor’s instructions, it is also appropriate in these situations to seek the advice of other professionals and request a second opinion.

Unfortunately, less than half of the people diagnosed with a serious or life-threatening disease request a second opinion. The most frequent reasons individuals cited for not doing so include: feeling an urgency to seek treatment right away, lack of access to experts or centers of excellence, fear that their insurance carrier would not cover the cost, and concerns about offending their doctor.

In most cases, these reasons are unmerited; in reality, many conditions do not require immediate treatment and most physicians welcome a second opinion. In addition, many insurance providers allow for second opinions and can even help identify local experts that participate in your plan.

So, when is getting a second opinion a good idea? According to WebMD, the following circumstances are appropriate:

  • Where the treatment is very risky or toxic
  • Where the diagnosis is not clear, the treatment is experimental, or there is no established consensus or Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment
  • If you’re considering participating in a trial for a new drug
  • If you’re considering some new experimental approach or a procedure that involves using experimental instruments or devices.

In many cases, second opinions are very beneficial.  In fact, a recent study highlighted their potential value.  Researchers found  that as many as 88% of those who sought a second opinion for a complex medical condition had a new diagnosis that changed their treatment plan, and 21% received a completely different diagnosis.

If you would like to seek a second opinion, but are unsure of how to start the conversation with your doctor, try some of these tips.

  • Tell your doctor you want to be sure that you explore all your treatment options. This may include looking into several surgical and non-surgical interventions.
  • Let your doctor know that you always talk to more than one expert when you need to make an important decision, whether it’s a medical, financial, or personal decision.
  • Explain to your doctor that a second opinion would give you peace of mind that your diagnosis and treatment plan are the best option for you.

Even if a second opinion doesn’t change your diagnosis or treatment plan, you can feel satisfied that you made a well-informed decision.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Free Core Strengthening and Circulation Classes At Flushing Hospital

In an effort to improve the overall wellness of our surrounding community and employees, Flushing Hospital Medical Center has partnered with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation’s, Shape Up NYC, to offer free core strengthening and circulation classes to everyone.

Leading the class is Jordan, a trained specialist in fitness who knows how to make exercise enjoyable for everyone.

According to Shape Up NYC, “this class includes core strengthening and circulation techniques to improve balance and improve intestinal health, dynamic and static stretching, calisthenics and plyometric bodyweight strengthening, Cardiovascular exercises, core-focused breathing postures to slow the mind and for a stronger body, and meditation.”

Class began on March 5th and will take place every Tuesday at 5:00 pm at the 5th Fl. Auditorium/Conference Room A, corner of 45th Avenue and Burling Street.

You can sign up at the time of attendance and please bring your own mat.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Danica Santos  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Danica:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working at Flushing Hospital for 4 years since 2015.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Medsurg 2 North 2
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  My mother and grandmother are nurses. I grew up with a family in the medical field. I just knew that that would be my career from the start. I always wanted to help people. I wanted to care for them, reassure them, and heal them to their best condition. I wanted to learn from and interact with people from different kinds of backgrounds.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The people I work with and the patients and families I help. Without a great team, I wouldn’t be here. We always have each other’s back. When helping patients and their families, I want to make them as comfortable as possible when they’re in the hospital. They may seem lost, scared, maybe even separated from their family. You never know their life story. But receiving a simple thank you with a big smile on their face is the best feeling in the world.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Adrienne Diaz, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month,

Meet Adrienne:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I have been working at Flushing for 4 years since 2014.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: I work in the Med-Surg unit 4N1.
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A: Growing up in a community that lacked healthcare resources and had a language barrier I always knew I wanted to contribute and give back to my community. As a nurse at Flushing Hospital, which is so diverse and part of the community I grew up in, I am able to fulfill that goal of giving back.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A: The best part of my job is being able to impact someone’s life in a positive way even by a small gesture such as, when a patient tells me how happy they are that I am their nurse for the day or a simple thank you from a patient when I’m having a stressful day.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Elizabeth Sun, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month,

Meet Elizabeth:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I have been working at Flushing Hospital for seven years since 2011.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Perinatal
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A: After working in the family business for a while, I wanted a career for myself. I enjoy working with people and helping them so the obvious choice was to become a nurse. Nursing also appealed to me due to the diverse fields it encompassed.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Caring for my patients,  and I really enjoy meeting and conversing with different people. Every day I encounter different folks with different backgrounds and opinions. I have learned a lot at FHMC, not only about nursing but also about people.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fainting

Whether watching a scene in a movie or on a television show or witnessing it happen in person, we have all seen someone faint, but do we really know what it is or what causes someone to do it?

Fainting, also called syncope (pronounced SIN-ko-pee), is a sudden, brief loss of consciousness and posture caused by decreased blood flow to the brain.

There are many different conditions that can cause someone to faint, including having an irregular heartbeat or low blood sugar. It can also be due to a condition called anemia, which is a deficiency in healthy oxygen-carrying cells or problems with the nervous system.  Anxiety, stress, hunger, dehydration or the use of alcohol or drugs can all lead to a fainting spell. In some cases, fainting runs in families.

While fainting may indicate a particular medical condition, sometimes it may occur in an otherwise healthy individual. In fact, most people who faint have no underlying heart or neurological problem. A simple fainting episode also called a vasovagal attack, is the most common type of fainting spell and is most common in children and young adults.

Typically, before someone faints, they will begin to feel a rush of warmth through their body, followed by a sensation of weakness or lightheadedness before going limp and passing out. The person may also break out in a cold sweat or experience nausea. In most cases, the individual who has fainted regains complete consciousness within just a few minutes.

Management of fainting is simple: Allow the person to recover while lying flat and elevate their legs to allow blood to flow to the brain. Drinking fruit juice after regaining consciousness can also be helpful, especially if the episode was due to low blood sugar.  If the patient doesn’t regain consciousness quickly, dial 911.

See a health care provider immediately if a person fainted hit their head, if they have fainted more than once in a month; if they are experiencing unusual symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, blurred vision or difficulty speaking; or if they are pregnant or have another serious condition. A doctor can help determine the cause and possibly address the underlying issue.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center,  please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.