Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of the Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Chenfei Huang RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Chenfei:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I started working at Flushing September of 2015. Initially started on telemetry 3N2, and later transitioned to ICU

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: ICU: MICU, SICU, CCU

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  The increasing diversity of the population in the metro area. The need for nurses with cultural awareness and understanding of specific population groups. I have an appreciation for the complexity of medical conditions. Lastly,  patients are living longer, I want to ensure that our population will receive the very best healthcare for years to come.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The ability to advocate for patients. In ICU, many patients are so sick that they are unable to speak up. Nurses are the voice of the patients. The gratitude you receive from patients is priceless.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – William “Jasper” Jackson

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Employee Spotlight shines on William “Jasper” Jackson.  Jasper is the Program Administrator in the Department of Medicine.

As Program Administrator, for the past five and a half years, Jasper has the responsibility of assisting in the day-to-day workings of the department.  He assists with the planning, implementation and monitoring of various processes and systems, as well as providing general office suppoemployee spotlight flushing hospital medical centerrt for the faculty, residents and staff.

When not at work, Jasper enjoys hiking and spending time with his family.  Additionally, he is involved in his community.  He is currently a board member at his Co-op as well as the Shirley Chisholm Day Care Centers, Inc.

Jasper loves the work he does even though there can be challenges with ensuring compliance with departmental and institutional requirements.  “The most rewarding part of my job is the sense of accomplishment as projects and tasks are completed.  I also love my interactions with colleagues throughout our network.”

Congratulations William “Jasper” Jackson for being chosen as June’s Employee Spotlight!

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Advocates for Healthy Mothers and Newborns

breastfeeding program flushing queensThe Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS)  highlights the many ways its member hospitals and health systems are transforming healthcare with their “Innovation Spotlight” campaign. Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) is proud to have been highlighted as an “Innovator” in advocating for healthy mothers and newborns.

In 2015, the hospital began a community-based program, Breastfeeding and Beyond: Breastfeeding Education and Nutrition in the Community.  According to HANYS, “FHMC works with partners in the community — including the New York City Public Library and Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children — to improve health and promote the well-being of women, newborns, infants, toddlers and children.”

“Over the past three years,  Flushing Hospital’s exclusive breastfeeding rates increased from 6%  to 30%. More than 375 women with their children and families have been educated both prenatally and after birth. The intent to breastfeed upon admission to the hospital increased from 50% in 2015 to 96% in 2018 and upon discharge from the hospital it rose from 29% in 2015 to 88% in 2018.” stated Maria D. Smilios, Director, Nursing-Maternal and Child Services.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Caring For A Loved One With Mental Illness

mental illness, caregiver, depression, bi-polar, panic disorder, anxiety, obessive compulsive disorder, depression

Clinical diagnosis for mental illness such as schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression can be difficult.  It is especially difficult when it is a loved one that is experiencing these conditions.

When a loved one has mental illness, family members can often feel emotions of embarrassment, anger, worry, self-blame or grief. Parents, specifically, can feel powerless over the disease and at a loss for what the best course of treatment for their child.

The focus becomes the person with mental illness, but studies have shown that it is just as important to maintain your own health while caring for a person with mental illness.

Some ways to maintain your health while being a caretaker are:

  • Maintain relationships with other family members
  • Seek professional support for yourself and your family
  • Participate in groups and family sessions with your loved one
  • Make time for yourself
  • Ask for help to lighten your responsibilities
  • Address one issue as a time to avoid burnout

As the caregiver, you are the tie that keeps everything together.  The more educated you are about the disease your loved one is facing and the time you set aside for yourself will be what helps you navigate the obstacles.

If your loved one has mental illness and you are seeking professional help as a caregiver, call the Mental Health Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5562 to schedule an appointment.

For more information for caring for a loved one with mental illness, visit American Phychological Association https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/serious-mental-illness.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips To Make Sure the Ice in Your Freezer is Clean

There is nothing more refreshing on a warm summer day than an ice-filled cold beverage, but before you host your next summer gathering, make sure that the ice you serve is clean and free of harmful bacteria.

While ice is rarely considered to be the source of trouble, there are good reasons to take a second look at how ice is dispensed in your own home.  You may think most bacteria wouldn’t survive the icy conditions of a freezer. But they can. Bacteria and viruses such as listeria, E-coli and salmonella can live in freezing temperatures, meaning they may be alive in your ice cubes. With proper precautions however, you can eliminate the risk of these contaminants existing in the ice you serve.

Here are some tips:

  • Change Your Filter – Most ice makers in freezers use a secondary water filter to stop particles from contaminating the ice. To keep your ice clean, change the freezer’s water filter as frequently as the manufacturer recommends, about every six months.
  • Regular Cleaning – Don’t forget to defrost and deep clean your freezer at least once a year. As a rule of thumb, if the ice buildup in your freezer is a quarter-inch or thicker, then it’s time to defrost and clean it.
  • Use Ice Regularly – The slight melting and refreezing of cubes can allow pathogens to take hold. To avoid this, remove the ice storage bin from the freezer and dump any clumps into the sink. Since inactivity causes ice clumps to form, the easiest solution is to use the ice maker more frequently.
  • Organize Your Freezer – Make sure frozen foods are properly sealed or double-wrapped and avoid having them come into direct contact with ice in trays or bins. Also label all food with a use-by date and remove all expired foods from your freezer.
  • Don’t Use Your Hands – While all of the above tips are useful, the fact is that the most common way to spread germs is by placing unwashed hands in an ice container. Instead of using your hands, use a designated scooper or other tool to handle ice.

It is important to note that while the existence of contaminants in your ice might be disturbing to learn, the health risks associated with it is fairly minimal to the average immune system and the transmission of viruses are rare. Those more at risk are pregnant women, children, and people with a compromised immune system.

Regardless, it is always a good idea to take the proper precautions to reduce your chances of getting yourself or your guests sick.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Tongue Scraping Good For Your Oral Health?

tongue scraper, oral health, dental, oral care, bad breath, cavities, gum disease

In addition to brushing, many people are adding tongue scraping as a way to remove extra particles from the surface of the tongue. This technique is safely done with a small round tool usually made from plastic or metal that gently glides across the surface of the tongue removing any buildup of bacteria, dead cells and debris.

This buildup can cause:

  • Your sense of taste to lessen
  • A white coat to appear on top of your tongue
  • An increase in the likelihood of a stale odor (bad breath) to emanate from your mouth
  • An increased in the likelihood of cavities and gum disease.

By using a tongue scraper as part of your daily oral hygiene, many of these conditions can be eradicated.

Consistency in oral hygiene is the key to success.  If you institute a regimen of brushing and flossing your teeth, as well as scraping your tongue regularly, you may find that your overall oral health will improve.

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center please call 718-670-5521 to schedule an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Does Adding More Protein To Your Diet Really Build Muscle?

Nutritionist in Flushing QueensIt is common for people to increase their intake of protein when building muscle. This may be the result of a common misconception that adding more protein to your diet helps to increase muscle mass. The truth is, excessive amounts of protein can do your body more harm than good (Experts recommend that anywhere between 10 to 30% of your diet should include protein).

An excessive amount of protein in your diet can have the following harmful effects:

  • A buildup of toxic ketones
  • An increase in the risk of dehydration
  • An elevation in blood lipids
  • An increase in the risk of heart disease
  • Protein being converted to fat

Another misconception about diet and building muscle is that carbohydrates should be avoided.  In fact, adequate amounts of good carbohydrates, found in whole grain bread and cereals can provide the energy needed to exercise and help your body process protein (Dietary guidelines suggest around 55% of your calories each day should come from carbohydrates).

To achieve the best results when building muscle, you must combine strength training exercises along with a diet that includes the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, water, fruits and vegetables.

If you have questions about your diet and nutrition, please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment with a dietitian at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

Flushing Hospital can diagnose memory loss

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month which gives us the chance to make the public aware of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease being very important health issues.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s have profound effects on many people. There are an estimated 5 million people with the disease and 15 million people who are caring for them. It is said to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

It has been said that Alzheimer’s is the only disease that can lead to death that cannot be slowed down, cured, or prevented. It acts by slowly killing brain cells which affects all of our ability to function normally.

Brain exercises may help mental functionality in areas of memory, focus, concentration and understanding.

Some suggested ways to keep our brains healthy are:

  • Getting enough sleep
  • Staying physically active
  • Eating properly
  • Not smoking
  • Challenging your mind with social interaction
  • Taking classes
  • Being aware of challenges that could lead to depression

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn the Symptoms of Painful Bladder Syndrome

Interstitial cystitis is a chronic condition causing bladder pressure and pain, with occasional pain extending into the pelvis. The condition is a part of a spectrum of diseases known as painful bladder syndrome.

patient with bladder pain,, which is a urology issue

Interstitial cystitis occurs when your bladder, which is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine, sends premature signals to your brain that you need to urinate. Normally these signals are sent once the bladder is full, but those with interstitial cystitis feel the sensation to urinate more often and produce smaller amounts of urine when they go.

Interstitial cystitis most often affects women and can have a long-lasting impact on quality of life. The symptoms may vary from person to person and they may change over time, periodically flaring in response to common triggers, such as menstruation, sitting for a long time, stress, exercise and sexual activity. In many cases symptoms of interstitial cystitis resemble those of a urinary tract infection.

Interstitial cystitis signs and symptoms include:

  • Pain in your pelvis or between the vagina and anus in women, the scrotum and anus in men
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • A persistent, urgent need to urinate
  • Frequent urination, often of small amounts, throughout the day and night (up to 60 times a day)
  • Pain or discomfort while the bladder fills and relief after urinating
  • Pain during sexual intercourse

The exact cause of interstitial cystitis isn’t known, but it’s likely that many factors contribute. One possible factor is a defect in the protective lining of the bladder which could result in toxic substances in urine to irritate the bladder wall.  Other possible but unproven contributing factors include an autoimmune reaction, genetics, infection or allergy.

Interstitial cystitis can result in a number of complications, including reduced bladder capacity, lower quality of life, sexual intimacy problems, and emotional troubles.

There is no current cure for interstitial cystitis, but there are medications and other therapies available that may offer relief. If you’re experiencing chronic bladder pain or urinary urgency and frequency, contact your doctor.

If you are experiencing symptoms of interstitial cystitis and would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-.5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Receives New 3T MRI Scanner

The Radiology Department at Flushing Hospital offers a wide variety of advanced, state-of-the-art diagnostic and imaging services to its patients. One of the ways they are able to do this is by offering the latest and most advanced imaging technology.

Through the acquisition of the Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra 3T MRI scanner, Flushing Hospital now provides one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced machines in healthcare.

Like Flushing’s previous MRI machine, the new model features an open-bore design, with an extra wide patient tube to accommodate larger patients. The larger size also increases comfort levels and decrease feelings of claustrophobia for all patients. The open-bore feature results in fewer patients requiring sedation and provides overall higher patient satisfaction.

Another benefit of the new MAGNETOM Skyra is its advanced imaging capabilities. Equipped with a 3T magnet, it provides the most accurate, high-resolution images and delivers them in less time. The Zero Helium boil-off feature and the Green Cooling package also make the new MRI machine more environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

This new technology compliments Flushing Hospital’s team of Board Certified and fellowship-trained radiologists and highly-trained, experienced technologists. The department is fully accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), which signifies a higher quality examination and care.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.