Can A Glycemic Index Help Diabetics Control Their Blood Sugar

If you have diabetes, you probably already know that eating certain carbohydrates can raise your blood sugar levels dramatically and quickly.

That’s because carbohydrates such as refined sugars and breads are easier for your body to convert into glucose, (the sugar your body uses for energy) than more slowly digested carbohydrates like those in vegetables and whole grains.

glycemic index, diabetes, flushing Hospital, blood sugar

If you are diabetic and consume too much of the wrong type of carbohydrates you may have a difficult time controlling your blood sugar. To help diabetics make better choices a guide known as the glycemic index (GI) has been developed. This index assigns numbers to carbohydrate-containing foods based on how much and how quickly they can increase your blood sugar. The glycemic index provides diabetics with a way to distinguish slower-acting “good carbs” from the faster “bad carbs.” Many utilize this tool to refine their carbohydrate intake and to help them maintain steady blood sugar levels.

According to the glycemic index, carbohydrates with a low GI value are more slowly digested, absorbed and metabolized, resulting in a lower and slower rise in blood glucose. GI values are divided into three categories:

  • 55 or less = Low (good)
  • 56- 69 = Medium
  • 70 or higher = High (bad)

Research has indicated that for most diabetics, the best tool for managing blood glucose is carbohydrate counting. Some clinical studies also suggest that a low GI diet can help people with diabetes control blood glucose levels, but there are warnings.

While the glycemic index can be a helpful tool to assist diabetics, most healthcare professionals agree that it shouldn’t be the only guide used to determine what to eat. One of the reasons for this is that the glycemic index only takes the carbohydrate value into account and doesn’t consider other nutritional values. The glycemic index also does not take into consideration the portion size of the carbohydrates being eaten, how they are being prepared, and what other foods are being consumed at the same time.

The glycemic index is also used by individuals who are trying to lose weight as well as those trying to adopt a healthier diet. Regardless of the reason however, doctors maintain that even though it can be helpful, the glycemic index should not be used in isolation as other nutritional factors, such as calories, fat, fiber, vitamins, and other nutrients should be considered.

If you have diabetes and are considering adopting the glycemic index into your diet, it is important to speak to your doctor first. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a diabetes specialist at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Understanding The Symptoms Of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that develops when the body’s immune system attacks its own nerves.

Flushing Hospital Provides Information About Guillain-Barre Syndrome

The initial symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome are weakness that usually begins in the lower extremities and spreads to the upper body and arms. This is accompanied by a tingling or prickling sensation in the extremities. These symptoms can rapidly intensify, eventually paralyzing the entire body.

Other signs and symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome may include:

  • Unsteady walking or inability to walk or climb stairs
  • Difficulty with eye or facial movements, including speaking, chewing or swallowing
  • Severe pain that may feel achy or cramp-like and may be worse at night
  • Difficulty with bladder control or bowel function
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Low or high blood pressure
  • Difficulty breathing

The cause of Guillain-Barre syndrome is unknown, but it is often preceded by an infectious illness such as a respiratory infection or the stomach flu.  It can also be triggered by certain viruses, such as influenza, Epstein-Barr, or Zika.  Anyone can get Guillain-Barre syndrome, but it is slightly more common in men and typically affects younger adults.

There is no known cure for Guillain-Barre syndrome, but several treatments can ease symptoms and reduce the duration of the illness. Most people recover from Guillain-Barre syndrome, though some may experience lingering effects from it, such as weakness, numbness or fatigue.

Call your doctor if you have mild tingling in your toes or fingers that doesn’t seem to be spreading or getting worse. If you do not have a doctor and would like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-

wn nerves.

The initial symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome are weakness that usually begins in the lower extremities and spreads to the upper body and arms. This is accompanied by a tingling or prickling sensation in the extremities. These symptoms can rapidly intensify, eventually paralyzing the entire body.

Other signs and symptoms of Guillain-Barre syndrome may include:

  • Unsteady walking or inability to walk or climb stairs
  • Difficulty with eye or facial movements, including speaking, chewing or swallowing
  • Severe pain that may feel achy or cramp-like and may be worse at night
  • Difficulty with bladder control or bowel function
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Low or high blood pressure
  • Difficulty breathing

The cause of Guillain-Barre syndrome is unknown, but it is often preceded by an infectious illness such as a respiratory infection or the stomach flu.  It can also be triggered by certain viruses, such as influenza, Epstein-Barr, or Zika.  Anyone can get Guillain-Barre syndrome, but it is slightly more common in men and typically affects younger adults.

There is no known cure for Guillain-Barre syndrome, but several treatments can ease symptoms and reduce the duration of the illness. Most people recover from Guillain-Barre syndrome, though some may experience lingering effects from it, such as weakness, numbness or fatigue.

Call your doctor if you have mild tingling in your toes or fingers that doesn’t seem to be spreading or getting worse. If you do not have a doctor and would like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do You Have A cough That You Just Can’t Shake? You Might Have A Chronic Cough

Having a cough is not only annoying, but it can also affect your daily routine, disrupt your sleep and even contribute to other issues, such as vomiting and lightheadedness. For most, coughing will only last a few days to a week, but if you have a cough that just won’t go away, you may have what is considered a chronic cough.

Flushing Hospital warns a cough that lasts over 8 weeks is considered chronic and our doctors can help determine the cause

A chronic cough is a medical problem where a person will have a cough that lasts eight weeks or longer (four weeks or longer in children). While it can sometimes be difficult to pinpoint the problem that’s triggering a chronic cough, it is most commonly due to one or a combination of the following:

  • Postnasal drip
  • Tobacco use
  • Asthma
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD
  • Infections such as whopping cough or TB
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Taking blood pressure medications

Fortunately, a chronic cough typically disappears once the underlying problem is treated.

See your doctor if you have a cough that lingers for weeks, especially one that brings up sputum or blood, disturbs your sleep, or affects school or work.

To make an appointment to see a doctor about your chronic cough, please call Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn More About Scarlet Fever And How To Protect Your Children

Scarlet fever is a bacterial illness that develops in some people who have strep throat. As the name implies, the condition is signified by a bright red rash that covers most of the body.

if untreated scarlet fever can b very dangerous for children, Flushing Hospital

Scarlet fever is most common in children five to 15 years of age. Although it was once considered a serious childhood illness, antibiotic treatments have made scarlet fever much more treatable. Still, if left untreated, scarlet fever can result in serious conditions that can affect the heart, kidneys, lungs and other parts of the body.

Common symptoms of scarlet fever include:

  • Red rash.The rash looks like a sunburn and feels like sandpaper. It typically begins on the face or neck and spreads to the trunk, arms and legs. If pressure is applied to the reddened skin, it will turn pale.
  • Red lines.The folds of skin around the groin, armpits, elbows, knees and neck usually become a deeper red than the surrounding rash.
  • Flushed face.The face may appear flushed with a pale ring around the mouth.
  • Strawberry tongue.The tongue generally looks red and bumpy, and it’s often covered with a white coating early in the disease.

The rash and the redness in the face and tongue usually last about a week. After these signs and symptoms have subsided, the skin affected by the rash often peels. Other signs and symptoms associated with scarlet fever include fever, sore throat, enlarged glands, nausea, vomiting and headache.

Scarlet fever typically spreads from person to person via droplets expelled when an infected person coughs or sneezes. A person will usually develop symptoms between two and four days after being exposed.

There is no vaccine to prevent scarlet fever. The best prevention strategies for scarlet fever is to practice proper hand washing hygiene, avoid sharing utensils or drinking glasses, wipe down all contaminated objects and surfaces and cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze.

Call your doctor immediately if your child develops any symptoms associated with scarlet fever.

To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s pediatric clinic, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Causing the Ringing in Your Ears?

Many of us will hear it from time to time. Only you can hear it- a ringing in your ear that may come and go.  The medical term for it: tinnitus. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), about 10% of adults in America have experienced tinnitus lasting at least five minutes in the past year.

Some of the causes you may experience ringing in your ears can be:

  • Trauma to the ear. This can include listening to your music loudly. The recommended listening should be at less than 90 decibels according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines.
  • Wax Build- up. Some people produce more ear wax than others. Instead of using Q-Tips, try softening the ear wax with peroxide or mineral oil and allow the wax to dissolve and drain.Ear Ringing-181524972
  • Excessive use of certain medicines such as aspiring or antibiotics.
  • Too much caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol, have also been known to cause ringing in the ears as well.

Is the ringing persistent? Contact Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center and schedule an appointment to see a physician at 718-670-5486..

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are Tremors And Why Do They Occur?

A tremor is an involuntary, rhythmic muscle contraction that results in shaking movements in one or more parts of the body. They most commonly affect the hands but can also occur in the arms, head, vocal cords or legs. Tremors can come and go, but they can also be constant. They can take place without reason or occur as a result of another disorder.  While they are not life threatening, tremors can be debilitating, making it very difficult to perform many daily tasks.

tremor, Flushing Hospital, Parkinson's Disease, Traumatic Brain Injury

Tremors are usually caused by a problem in the parts of the brain that control movement. Tremors typically appear in middle aged to older adults. They affect men and women equally and can run in families.

Tremors can occur on their own or be a symptom associated with a number of neurological disorders, including:

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Stroke
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Parkinson’s disease

Others reasons why someone may experience tremors include: a reaction to medications, alcohol abuse, anxiety disorders, mercury poisoning,  an overactive thyroid, or liver or kidney failure. Some tremors may be triggered by or worsen during times of stress or strong emotion, when an individual is physically exhausted, or when a person is in certain postures or makes certain movements.

Tremors are classified into two main categories, resting or action;  a resting tremor occurs when a person’s hands, arms, or legs shake when they are at rest. Often, the tremor only affects the hand or fingers and is often seen in people with Parkinson’s disease.  An action tremor occurs with the voluntary movement of a muscle. Most types of tremors are considered action tremors.

A neurologist can diagnose a tremor during an physical examination and medical history based on:

  • Whether tremors occur when the muscles are at rest or in action
  • The location of the tremor on the body
  • The frequency and severity of the tremor.

Your doctor will also check for other neurological abnormalities such as impaired balance or speech, or increased muscle stiffness. Blood or urine tests can rule out a thyroid malfunction, medication interaction or alcohol abuse as a cause. A CT Scan or MRI may be performed to determine if the tremor is the result of a brain injury and motor skill assessments can administered to determine functional limitations.

Although there is no cure for most forms of tremors, treatment options are available to help manage symptoms. In some cases, a person’s symptoms may be mild enough that they do not require treatment. In other cases, treating the underlying cause can reduce or eliminate the tremor. If no known cause is determined, medications, focused ultrasound, or surgery may be considered as treatment options.

To make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Division of Robotic Surgery Performs Minimally Invasive Colectomy Procedures

colectomy, Flushing Hospital, Robotic Surgery, Bowel Resection, Colon Cancer, Chron's Disease, Colitis, Colon, bowel obstruction

A colectomy, also known as a bowel resection, is a surgical procedure where a part of or the entire colon is removed.

The colon is part of the body’s digestive system, which removes and processes nutrients from foods and helps pass waste material out of the body. A colectomy may be required when the colon fails to function as it should.

This may occur for a variety of issues or conditions including:

  • Bowel obstruction – A blockage that keeps food or liquid from passing through your small or large intestine.
  • Bowel perforation – A hole in the wall of the small or large intestine. This is a serious and potentially fatal condition that may require immediate surgery.
  • Crohn’s disease – An inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation of your digestive tract, leading to abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition.
  • Ulcerative colitis – A condition that causes irritation and swelling of the small intestine that can lead to the development of sores called ulcers.
  • Colon cancer – A type of cancer where tiny growths called polyps develop in the colon or rectum over time and eventually become cancerous.

Depending on the issue and the severity, there are a number of different types of colectomy procedures, such as:

  • Total colectomy–The removal of the entire colon
  • Partial colectomy (or subtotal colectomy) – The removal of part of the colon
  • Hemicolectomy- The removal of the right or left portion of the colon
  • Proctocolectomy– The removal of both the colon and rectum

Traditionally, patients with any of these conditions needing a colectomy would have open surgery. These procedures require doctors to make a long incision in the wall of the abdomen so they can see the colon directly.

Thankfully, Flushing Hospital offers patients a much more minimally invasive option. Through the acquisition of the da Vinci surgical platform, patients can now have colectomy procedures performed robotically.

During robot-assisted procedures, Flushing Hospital’s expert team of surgeons can guide the state-of-the-art da Vinci robot to make the smallest of incisions, resulting in less pain, minimal scarring, and faster recovery time.

If you are experiencing any form of irritable bowel disease that may require surgical intervention, please call Flushing Hospital’s Division of Robotic Surgery at 718-670- 3135 to learn how we can help.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn How to Properly Stored Your Insulin in the Summer

We would never waste our food or allow it to become spoiled by the heat, but what about medicines? Medicines should not be the exception, specifically insulin.

insulin, insulin storage, diabetes, Flushing Hospital, summer health

Insulin is a protein which is dissolved in water and is required to manage blood sugar levels in diabetics. As with any protein, bacteria can grow in insulin, making it susceptible to become spoiled. Bacteria can also break down the proteins in insulin and makes it less effective. Keeping insulin cool can help prevent it from spoiling and maintain its effectiveness. The recommended temperature for storage, once opened, should be anywhere from 59-68 degrees Fahrenheit. For insulin not in use, store between 36-46 degrees Fahrenheit. For many diabetics, insulin is most comfortably administered at room temperature.

Some other storage tips include:
• Do not freeze or use thawed insulin. The freezing temperature will break down the proteins and will not work to lower blood sugar levels.
• Do not leave in sunlight. This can break down the proteins in insulin as well.
• Inspect insulin prior to each use. Ensure that there are no clumps, crystals or particles in the bottle or pen. Insulin should be clear.
• Write the ‘start use’ date on the insulin vial and discard after 28 days or if it’s been opened.
• Never use expired insulin.
• Be wary of any unusual smells. Insulin should never have an odor or bad smell.

Insulin is administered in many forms including injections, pens or cartridges. Each may have different recommended storage times based on their manufacturer. It is important to check with a pharmacist, package insert, or the manufacturers’ website to ensure proper storage temperature of insulin.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips To Make Sure the Ice in Your Freezer is Clean

There is nothing more refreshing on a warm summer day than an ice-filled cold beverage, but before you host your next summer gathering, make sure that the ice you serve is clean and free of harmful bacteria.

While ice is rarely considered to be the source of trouble, there are good reasons to take a second look at how ice is dispensed in your own home.  You may think most bacteria wouldn’t survive the icy conditions of a freezer. But they can. Bacteria and viruses such as listeria, E-coli and salmonella can live in freezing temperatures, meaning they may be alive in your ice cubes. With proper precautions however, you can eliminate the risk of these contaminants existing in the ice you serve.

Here are some tips:

  • Change Your Filter – Most ice makers in freezers use a secondary water filter to stop particles from contaminating the ice. To keep your ice clean, change the freezer’s water filter as frequently as the manufacturer recommends, about every six months.
  • Regular Cleaning – Don’t forget to defrost and deep clean your freezer at least once a year. As a rule of thumb, if the ice buildup in your freezer is a quarter-inch or thicker, then it’s time to defrost and clean it.
  • Use Ice Regularly – The slight melting and refreezing of cubes can allow pathogens to take hold. To avoid this, remove the ice storage bin from the freezer and dump any clumps into the sink. Since inactivity causes ice clumps to form, the easiest solution is to use the ice maker more frequently.
  • Organize Your Freezer – Make sure frozen foods are properly sealed or double-wrapped and avoid having them come into direct contact with ice in trays or bins. Also label all food with a use-by date and remove all expired foods from your freezer.
  • Don’t Use Your Hands – While all of the above tips are useful, the fact is that the most common way to spread germs is by placing unwashed hands in an ice container. Instead of using your hands, use a designated scooper or other tool to handle ice.

It is important to note that while the existence of contaminants in your ice might be disturbing to learn, the health risks associated with it is fairly minimal to the average immune system and the transmission of viruses are rare. Those more at risk are pregnant women, children, and people with a compromised immune system.

Regardless, it is always a good idea to take the proper precautions to reduce your chances of getting yourself or your guests sick.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn the Symptoms of Painful Bladder Syndrome

Interstitial cystitis is a chronic condition causing bladder pressure and pain, with occasional pain extending into the pelvis. The condition is a part of a spectrum of diseases known as painful bladder syndrome.

patient with bladder pain,, which is a urology issue

Interstitial cystitis occurs when your bladder, which is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine, sends premature signals to your brain that you need to urinate. Normally these signals are sent once the bladder is full, but those with interstitial cystitis feel the sensation to urinate more often and produce smaller amounts of urine when they go.

Interstitial cystitis most often affects women and can have a long-lasting impact on quality of life. The symptoms may vary from person to person and they may change over time, periodically flaring in response to common triggers, such as menstruation, sitting for a long time, stress, exercise and sexual activity. In many cases symptoms of interstitial cystitis resemble those of a urinary tract infection.

Interstitial cystitis signs and symptoms include:

  • Pain in your pelvis or between the vagina and anus in women, the scrotum and anus in men
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • A persistent, urgent need to urinate
  • Frequent urination, often of small amounts, throughout the day and night (up to 60 times a day)
  • Pain or discomfort while the bladder fills and relief after urinating
  • Pain during sexual intercourse

The exact cause of interstitial cystitis isn’t known, but it’s likely that many factors contribute. One possible factor is a defect in the protective lining of the bladder which could result in toxic substances in urine to irritate the bladder wall.  Other possible but unproven contributing factors include an autoimmune reaction, genetics, infection or allergy.

Interstitial cystitis can result in a number of complications, including reduced bladder capacity, lower quality of life, sexual intimacy problems, and emotional troubles.

There is no current cure for interstitial cystitis, but there are medications and other therapies available that may offer relief. If you’re experiencing chronic bladder pain or urinary urgency and frequency, contact your doctor.

If you are experiencing symptoms of interstitial cystitis and would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-.5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.