Do You Ever Have Sweaty Palms ?

Having your palms sweat as a nervous response to a stressful situation is something that most people have experienced at some point in their lives, but for some, sweaty palms (or palmar hyperhidrosis), is a chronic condition that can cause great embarrassment and interfere with their day to day existence.

Palmer hyperhidrosis affects approximately 1 and 3 percent of Americans, but researchers believe that this number is low because many are unaware that it is a medical condition and never report it to their doctor.

This condition is part of a family of disorders called primary focal hyperhidrosis, which can affect other parts of the body including the armpits, scalp and feet. These conditions are usually not caused by an underlying medical issue and are unlike secondary hyperhidrosis, which is characterized by excessive sweating that isn’t isolated to one area of the body and is usually the result of another medical problem.

While the exact cause of palmer hyperhidrosis is still unknown, many believe there is a genetic predisposition as many who have it also report a family history of the condition.

There are many treatment options for palmer hyperhidrosis, including:

  • Topical aluminum chloride – One of the most common treatments for palmer hyperhidrosis. This solution is applied to the palms nightly until the condition improves and then used as needed.
  • Botox injections – This has proven to be an effective treatment for many forms of localized sweating, including the palms. The treatment is FDA approved, but it can result in temporary weakness in the hands.
  • Iontophoresis – A treatment that involves placing your hands in a shallow bath of water that contains a mild electrical current. This medical device can cost over $500 and may not be covered by all insurers.
  • Medications – Oral prescriptions called anticholinergics are sometimes prescribed if other treatment options aren’t successful, but these medications sometimes cause uncomfortable side effects.
  • Surgery – If all other measures fail, there are procedures where a surgeon can go into the chest and clip the nerves that are responsible for producing sweat. This can be a permanent solution, but only used in extreme cases.

Speak to your doctor about what type of treatment option is best for you. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is it Possible to Get the Flu in the Summer ?

Most people associate flu season with the late fall and winter months but it is also possible to get the flu during the summer. While the colder weather can help the flu virus to flourish, it is important to remember that it is not the temperature that causes the flu. The virus is spread by coming in to contact with someone who already has it.

Summer flu symptoms are the same as they would be during any other time of the year and can include:

  • High fever
  • Chills
  • Body aches and pains
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness

People who are at high risk for developing complications from the flu include:

  • Women who are pregnant
  • People over the age of 65
  • People who have a weakened immune system
  • Children under the age of two
  • People who have diabetes, heart disease, or lung disease

Ways to avoid the flu include practicing good hygiene, eating healthy, getting enough rest, and avoiding people who are ill.

If you think that you are experiencing flu like symptoms you should see your medical provider to get diagnosed and start treatment. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Common Causes of Swollen Feet

For many people who spend long hours standing every day, experiencing swollen feet is a pretty routine occurrence. The swelling is caused by an accumulation of fluid in the skin and typically will resolve once the feet are elevated.

The symptoms of swelling are dependent on the underlying cause is. Swelling can be mild puffiness with no discomfort to very severe with changes in skin texture, color, and with a lot of pain. In very severe cases, swelling can lead to ulcerations, infections, and ultimately death if not treated in a timely manner.

Some of the medical issues of swollen feet can be due to:

  • Injury
  • Pregnancy
  • Congestive heart  failure
  • Lymphedema
  • Blood Clots
  • Varicose veins
  • Infections
  • Medications such as steroids, antidepressants, and calcium channel blockers
  • Venous insufficiency

Diagnosing swollen feet usually starts with a visual inspection and then by pressing into the skin with a finger to see if it leads to an indentation.

In some cases preventing swollen feet can be done by wearing support stockings, proper exercise, eating a healthy diet low in salt, and avoiding smoking and drinking alcohol.

Treating swollen feet is dependent on the cause and can include:

  • Medication
  • Surgery
  • Wrapping the limb with an elastic bandage
  • Elevating the foot above the level of the heart when possible

If you are experiencing swollen feet, consult your doctor who will find out what is causing the problem. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, you can call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Have You Ever Experienced Heart Palpitations?

Experiencing heart palpitations can be a very frightening experience. Palpitations have been described as feeling like the heart is fluttering, beating too fast, too hard, or like you are skipping a beat.

Palpitations are often benign. In most instances they may be caused by::

  • Too much stressheart palpitations
  • Too much anxiety
  • Too much vigorous activity
  • Too much caffeine
  • Too much alcohol
  • Too much nicotine
  • Thyroid disease
  • Anemia
  • Pregnancy
  • Depression
  • High fever
  • Taking too much of certain types of medications such as stimulants found in cold and cough medications , asthma inhalers, and some herbal supplements.

However, there are other situations in which they can indicate the presence of a very serious problem, like a heart attack or a stroke.

Sometimes heart palpitations can be due to heart disease, especially in people who have had prior heart attacks, have heart valve problems, heart muscle problems, and coronary artery disease. When palpitations are accompanied by chest pain, fainting, shortness of breath, or dizziness, it is important to seek emergency care right away.

There are a few tests that your doctor may order to find the cause of the palpitations. These include blood tests, EKG, Holter Monitoring, chest x-ray, and an echocardiogram.

Depending on the cause, you may be able to reduce the risk of palpitations by limiting stress, the consumption of nicotine, alcohol or caffeine.  Medications such as beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers can also be helpful.

Speak to your physician if you are experiencing palpitations to see if they can understand why this is occurring. You may also schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Dangers of Distracted Cycling

More people are cycling these days; for pleasure or for work. With the increase in the number of people using bicycles to get from place to place, there has also been an increase in the number of accidents involving cyclists.

Some of these accidents are due to distracted motor vehicle drivers but others are due to cyclists not paying full attention to the road.

The two most common distractions that lead to accidents are cyclists using ear buds to listen to music or talk on the phone while pedaling. This limits their ability to hear car horns and other audio cues in their surroundings. Another distraction is using hand- held mobile devices. Using cellphones or other mobile devices while riding creates a visual distraction and prevents cyclists from watching the road for signs of danger and holding their handlebars properly.

To ensure their safety, people on bicycles must use their vision and hearing to give their full attention to their environment.

Cyclists should obey the rules of the road, be mindful of keeping their eyes and ears free from distractions, always wear a helmet, and keep in mind that motorists may not be paying attention.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Watermelon

One of the foods most closely associated with summertime is watermelon. It is tasty and quenches your thirst but did you know that it is also healthy for you ?

It is believed that watermelon may help in the prevention of diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure, heat stroke, kidney disorders, and macular degeneration.

 

Some of the known benefits of watermelon are:

  • It is high in lycopene, an antioxidant believed to curb cancer and also protect the skin from the sun’s rays
  • It contains an amino acid citrulline which may lower blood pressure and also lower the risk of a heart attack
  • It contains beta-cryptoxanthin which lowers joint inflammation
  • It contains vitamin A which is good for the eyes
  • It is 92% water and good for keeping hydrated and feeling full
  • It contains vitamins A, B6, and C which keeps the skin soft and supple
  • It is low in calories
  • It is high in potassium which is important for flushing out the toxins through the kidneys
  • It is easy to digest
  • The potassium and magnesium helps insulin to function properly which controls diabetes

One of the risks associated with eating watermelon is that if it is pre-cut, there is a chance of being exposed to salmonella. It must be refrigerated below 40 degrees and washed thoroughly before eating.

Enjoy your summer and make watermelon a part of your summertime snacks.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

Flushing Hospital can diagnose memory loss

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month which gives us the chance to make the public aware of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease being very important health issues.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s have profound effects on many people. There are an estimated 5 million people with the disease and 15 million people who are caring for them. It is said to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

It has been said that Alzheimer’s is the only disease that can lead to death that cannot be slowed down, cured, or prevented. It acts by slowly killing brain cells which affects all of our ability to function normally.

Brain exercises may help mental functionality in areas of memory, focus, concentration and understanding.

Some suggested ways to keep our brains healthy are:

  • Getting enough sleep
  • Staying physically active
  • Eating properly
  • Not smoking
  • Challenging your mind with social interaction
  • Taking classes
  • Being aware of challenges that could lead to depression

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is the keto diet right for you ?

A ketogenic diet, also called keto diet is based on the concept that foods that contain fat are responsible for 90% of our daily calories. This type of diet tries to change the source of our body’s fuel from carbohydrates to ketone bodies that the liver produces from stored fat.

In order for the body to do this, it has to reduce the use of carbohydrates as fuel. That means lowering our intake of carbohydrates to between 25 to 50 grams of carbohydrates a day. It can take a few days for the body to adapt to this kind of change.

The keto diet requires a person to eat fat at every meal. Food that contains saturated fat like palm and coconut oil, butter, beef, pork and bacon are recommended. Unsaturated fats found in nuts, seeds, avocados and olives are also allowed.

Fruits and vegetables contain carbohydrates, have some, they are recommended only in small amounts daily.

The risks of a keto diet include:

  • Kidney problems
  • Constipation
  • Mood swings
  • Liver problems
  • Nutrient deficiency
  • Resuming a normal diet will cause weight gain

Before beginning any diet, it is recommended that you speak with your physician first. If you would like to speak to a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, you may call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sunglasses – Strength and Protection

At this time of year we spend more time outdoors and for that reason it is important to protect our eyes from the potentially harmful rays of the sun. One of the ways we can do this is by wearing the right sunglasses.

Don’t be fooled by the price tag when purchasing sunglasses. Just because sunglasses are expensive doesn’t always mean that they are the best at blocking the UV rays. Always check the label first.

For sunglasses to be completely effective they should:

  • Block out as close to 100% of the UVA and UVB  rays as possible
  • Block out 75 to 90 percent of the visible light
  • Have gray lenses for proper color recognition

If we are exposed to too much UV rays, over time, it can cause cataracts and can also harm the cornea and the retina. Short term exposure to UV radiation can cause photokeratitis, an inflammation of the cornea. It is temporary in the short term but can have serious consequences long term.

It is also important that sunglasses fit properly. They shouldn’t be worn so close that they touch the eyelids yet not too far off that they let sun get in around them.

A good rule to follow is if you are wearing sunscreen you should also be wearing sunglasses.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Parsley

If you are like most Americans, you probably think of parsley as just something decorative that gets put on a plate to make a meal look pretty. However, parsley is now known to have many health benefits that many of us don’t know about. Before it became popular as a food, parsley was originally used for medicinal purposes by the ancient Greeks and Romans.

Parsley contains many nutrients. It has vitamins A, K and C, minerals that include magnesium, potassium, folate, iron and calcium. It is also relatively low in calories.

The health benefits of parsley include:

  • Helps treat fatigue, hormone imbalances, liver problems, and menstrual pain,
  • Possesses antioxidant power
  • Promotes kidney cleansing
  • Reduces edema
  • Helps weight loss
  • Helps metabolism
  • Acts as an anti-inflammatory
  • Helps heal scars
  • Reduces toxins in the body
  • Aids digestion
  • Slows tumor growth
  • Helps to prevent osteoporosis
  • Reduces acid formation
  • Has antibacterial and antifungal properties

Consult with a physician before adding parsley in large amounts to the diet. People who are pregnant, have a tendency to form kidney stones, or susceptible to a rash should be cautious when eating it. You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5486 to discuss if parsley is good for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.