Sunglasses – Strength and Protection

At this time of year we spend more time outdoors and for that reason it is important to protect our eyes from the potentially harmful rays of the sun. One of the ways we can do this is by wearing the right sunglasses.

Don’t be fooled by the price tag when purchasing sunglasses. Just because sunglasses are expensive doesn’t always mean that they are the best at blocking the UV rays. Always check the label first.

For sunglasses to be completely effective they should:

  • Block out as close to 100% of the UVA and UVB  rays as possible
  • Block out 75 to 90 percent of the visible light
  • Have gray lenses for proper color recognition

If we are exposed to too much UV rays, over time, it can cause cataracts and can also harm the cornea and the retina. Short term exposure to UV radiation can cause photokeratitis, an inflammation of the cornea. It is temporary in the short term but can have serious consequences long term.

It is also important that sunglasses fit properly. They shouldn’t be worn so close that they touch the eyelids yet not too far off that they let sun get in around them.

A good rule to follow is if you are wearing sunscreen you should also be wearing sunglasses.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines On Cyril Reid

May’s Employee Spotlight shines on Cyril Reid, better known to all as “CJ,” a Third Cook at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) cafeteria.

Each morning, CJ is at the server grilling delicious breakfast fare for visitors and employees.  He is well known for his vegetable omelets.  He takes great pride and care in the preparation and presentation of each dish prepared.

Although CJ is a fairly new employee at FHMC, he has quickly developed a positive reputation and following.

When CJ is not at FHMC, he enjoys spending time with his lovely girlfriend, mother, grandmother and siblings.  When they are together CJ shares with them his love for family, basketball and, of course, food.

CJ stated that the most rewarding part of his job is, “Getting compliments from customers telling me that what I served them was delicious.” He tries his very best to make sure that any and all unforeseen obstacles within his control are addressed before he takes his place at the grill station.

For serving it up just right, we shine the Employee Spotlight on Cyril Reid.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Recognizes National Don’t Fry Fry Day

The Friday before Memorial Day is designated National Don’t Fry Day – a day to raise awareness about sun safety and encourage everyone to take the necessary steps to protect their skin from cancer.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the nation, with almost 5.5 million cases diagnosed in Americans each year – more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers combined.  In fact, one out of every five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer at some time in their lives.

Flushing Hospital and the American Cancer Society would like to share the following tips to avoid frying in the sun this summer:

  • Seek shade during the peak time of day – the sun is at its strongest between 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
  • Dress properly – Wear sun-protective clothing as well as UV blocking sunglasses and wide-brimmed hats
  • Use sunscreen – It is recommended that you apply sunscreen that is at least SPF 30 every 2 hours
  • Avoid tanning devices – These give off UVA rays just like the sun.

By following these tips, you and your family can enjoy the sun, while protecting yourself from the harm that it can cause

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition characterized by reddening and the appearance of blood vessels on the face.  Rosacea can also cause red bumps containing pus to develop as well as redness of the eyes and thickening of the skin on the nose- causing it to appear bigger than it really is.

Currently, there are approximately 14 million people living with rosacea in the United States.  While the condition can affect anyone, it is most likely to occur in:

  • Women more than men
  • People between the ages of 30 and 50
  • Those with a family history of rosacea
  • Those who had acne when they were younger
  • Those with fair skin, blue eyes and blond hair
  • Smokers

The causes of rosacea are unknown; however, there are indications that suggest symptoms may present as the result of an immune response, intestinal bacteria (H. pylori), a mite found in nature or a protein in the skin that is not functioning properly.

There are triggers that can cause a flare-up of rosacea, they include: being overheated, eating spicy foods, drinking hot liquids or alcoholic beverages, strong or sudden emotions, cosmetics, medications for blood pressure, sunlight, or having cold wind blowing on the face.

There aren’t any specific tests for rosacea, but doctors will want to rule out lupus and an allergic reaction.  Depending on the severity, there are a few ways to alleviate symptoms of rosacea. These include:

  • Avoiding triggers
  • Protecting the skin from strong sunlight by applying sunscreen or wearing protective clothing
  • Using mild soap and skin cream
  • Taking medications that help tighten the blood vessels
  • Undergoing laser treatments
  • Getting dermabrasion

If you are experiencing symptoms of rosacea, it is important that you see a physician to get an accurate diagnosis and start a treatment plan.  If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486,

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do Detox Teas Do More Harm Than Good?

Dieting is never easy, nor is there a “quick fix” for weight loss on the market that comes without some risk.

The latest trend seems to be detox teas.  The active ingredient in most of the teas is caffeine.  Caffeine can produce side effects such as nervousness, stomach irritation, nausea, vomiting, anxiety and agitation, headache, ringing in the ears as well as increased heart and breathing rates.

As an appetite suppressant, products containing caffeine may work for the short term. Often times detox teas that combine caffeine with a diuretic that may trigger a false sense of weight loss since diuretics cause a loss of water weight, not actual body fat.

Additionally, the caffeine in the teas may cause you to have insomnia.  Studies have shown that a lack of sleep can trigger excessive eating and even slow your metabolism causing you to gain weight.

Nutritionists and healthcare professionals agree that there is no magic formula to weight loss.  The best way to plan for weight loss is to start with a visit to your doctor, make healthy food choices, implement portion control when eating and start a light exercise regimen slowly building as your endurance increases.  The formula for keeping the weight off is to retrain your brain so that you can maintain your new healthier lifestyle.

If you are thinking about taking off a few pounds and would like to speak with a health care professional at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Eileen Flores  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Eileen:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:   I started as a student at Flushing’s nursing school in 1976. I graduated as an RN in 1979 and have worked here since.

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: The name of the department I work in is PACU. I worked in PACU since 1988. My present position is Assistant Head Nurse.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  I decided to become a nurse when my youngest brother was admitted to the hospital. I saw the care he was given and how it made a difference. I wanted to be able to do the same.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Working in a place that treats everyone like family.  I have taken care of so many people during my time at Flushing Hospital.  We have seen many children grow up and have families of their own, which we also take care of. I take pride in our sense of community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a Herniated Disk and What Are the Symptoms?

Our spine consists of a series of bones called vertebrae. Separating these vertebrae are cushions filled with a jellylike substance. These cushions allow the spine to bend. When one of these disks starts to slip out of place, it causes a condition called a slipped, ruptured, or herniated disk.

Most herniated discs occur in your lower back (lumbar spine), although they can also occur in your neck (cervical spine). You can suffer a herniated disk and not experience any symptoms, but most people do. The most common symptoms associated with a herniated disk are:

  • Arm or leg pain – If your herniated disk is in your lower back, you’ll typically feel the most intense pain in your buttocks, thigh and calf. If your herniated disk is in your neck, the pain will typically be most intense in the shoulder and arm. This pain may be more intense when you cough, sneeze or move your spine into certain positions.
  • Numbness or tingling – People who have a herniated disk often experience numbness or tingling in the body part served by the affected nerves.
  • Weakness – Muscles served by the affected nerves tend to weaken. This may cause you to stumble, or impair your ability to lift or hold items.

While suffering a herniated disk is most often the result of a natural aging process called disk degeneration, it can sometimes be the result of a traumatic event or improperly lifting heavy objects.

Risk factors for developing a herniated disk include:

  • Excess body weight causes extra stress on the disks in your lower back.
  • People with physically demanding jobs have a greater risk of back problems.
  • Some people inherit a predisposition to developing a herniated disk.

Tips to avoid a herniated disk include exercising, maintaining a healthy weight, lifting heavy objects with your legs and not your back, and practicing good posture.

In many cases, the best treatment for a herniated disk is rest, but if your symptoms are persistent or worsening, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor who may prescribe medications or refer you for physical rehabilitation.

If you are experiencing symptoms associated with a herniated disk and would like to see a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-  5486 to make an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Esophageal Cancer

esophageal cancer Esophageal cancer is a disease that develops when cancer forms in the esophagus- the long, hollow, muscular tube that runs from your throat to your stomach.   The esophagus helps to move food and liquids to your stomach after you swallow.

Cancer of the esophagus is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. It occurs more often in men than in women.

Although the cause for esophageal cancer is unclear, research indicates that the disease may develop as a result of damaged DNA in the cells that line the esophagus.  It is also believed that chronic irritation to the esophagus is a contributing factor.   Other factors that may increase the risk of developing the disease include:

  • Being obese
  • Having GERD
  • Having Barrett’s esophagus( A serious complication of GERD)
  • Having bile reflux
  • Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Undergoing radiation treatments to the chest or upper abdomen

Esophageal cancer may not have symptoms in its early stages.  However, as the disease progresses the following symptoms may occur:

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Chronic cough
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Indigestion and heartburn

Cancer of the esophagus can be diagnosed by performing a series of tests and procedures that include genomic testing, imaging scans, endoscopy or biopsy. If it is found that you have developed esophageal cancer, your doctor may request further testing to determine the stage of cancer.

Treatment for esophageal cancer is based on stage, overall health and your preferences for care. Immunotherapy, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy or interventional radiology are some of the approaches that your doctor may discuss with you.

If you are experiencing symptoms of esophageal cancer, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5486 to make an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Guacamole Recipe

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Clinical Nutritional Manager, Jessica Hyman RD, CDN- is sharing one of her favorite, healthy Guacamole Recipes:

Healthy Guacamole recipeINGREDIENTS: Serves 8
4 Ripe avocados
1 Lime, juiced
3 Tbsp. Onion, finely minced
1 Serrano chili, thinly sliced (or seeded and diced to lessen the heat)
1 Clove garlic, finely minced
2 Tbsp. Cilantro, finely chopped (optional)
1 Tomato, medium 1/4 inch dice

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. In a medium bowl, mash avocado with lime, onion, chile, garlic, and cilantro (optional) until the guacamole is mostly smooth only small chunks of avocado remain.
2. Stir in tomatoes, gently (so they don’t get smooshed!)

Serve with warm corn tortillas instead of chips!

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories 120
Total Fat 11 g
Chol 0 mg
Potassium 397 mg
Total Carbohydrates 7 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g

Includes Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and Calcium
Why this recipe is so great: Most of the fats from avocado are monounsaturated fats, which are the fats that are known as “Healthy Fats.” These can help lower “Bad Cholesterol” levels, helping to reduce incidence of heart disease and stroke.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is it Okay to Request a Second Opinion From Your Doctor?

Receiving news that you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a serious or rare medical condition can be very overwhelming and scary. While it is important to listen to and follow your doctor’s instructions, it is also appropriate in these situations to seek the advice of other professionals and request a second opinion.

Unfortunately, less than half of the people diagnosed with a serious or life-threatening disease request a second opinion. The most frequent reasons individuals cited for not doing so include: feeling an urgency to seek treatment right away, lack of access to experts or centers of excellence, fear that their insurance carrier would not cover the cost, and concerns about offending their doctor.

In most cases, these reasons are unmerited; in reality, many conditions do not require immediate treatment and most physicians welcome a second opinion. In addition, many insurance providers allow for second opinions and can even help identify local experts that participate in your plan.

So, when is getting a second opinion a good idea? According to WebMD, the following circumstances are appropriate:

  • Where the treatment is very risky or toxic
  • Where the diagnosis is not clear, the treatment is experimental, or there is no established consensus or Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment
  • If you’re considering participating in a trial for a new drug
  • If you’re considering some new experimental approach or a procedure that involves using experimental instruments or devices.

In many cases, second opinions are very beneficial.  In fact, a recent study highlighted their potential value.  Researchers found  that as many as 88% of those who sought a second opinion for a complex medical condition had a new diagnosis that changed their treatment plan, and 21% received a completely different diagnosis.

If you would like to seek a second opinion, but are unsure of how to start the conversation with your doctor, try some of these tips.

  • Tell your doctor you want to be sure that you explore all your treatment options. This may include looking into several surgical and non-surgical interventions.
  • Let your doctor know that you always talk to more than one expert when you need to make an important decision, whether it’s a medical, financial, or personal decision.
  • Explain to your doctor that a second opinion would give you peace of mind that your diagnosis and treatment plan are the best option for you.

Even if a second opinion doesn’t change your diagnosis or treatment plan, you can feel satisfied that you made a well-informed decision.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.