Dental Implants

Dentist in Flushing QueensAccording to the American College of Prosthodontists, “it is estimated that 178 million Americans are missing at least one tooth and about 40 million Americans are missing all of their teeth.” Tooth loss in adults is often the result of tooth decay, injury or periodontal disease.

There are several devices utilized by dentists to replace missing teeth; however, one of the most natural feeling and looking is a dental implant. Dental implants are metal frames or posts that are surgically placed in the jawbone. They serve as roots for missing teeth and support permanent tooth prosthetics such as crowns that are custom made to match your teeth.  Dental implants are often a safe and permanent solution.

Although dental implants are a favorable choice for many, implant surgery may not be for everyone.   Depending on the status of their health, patients with certain conditions such as diabetes, cardiac problems, unhealthy gums or those with significant bone loss of the jaw may not be suitable candidates for this procedure.

As with any surgical procedure, there are risks associated with dental implant surgery.  Risks are rare but may include:

  • Infection at the implant site
  • Dental implants protruding into sinus cavities causing sinus problems
  • Damage to other teeth or blood vessels
  • Nerve damage at the implant site

The procedure is typically performed in an outpatient setting by a highly trained dental specialist. Your dentist will most likely prescribe medications or antibiotics to help relieve pain and reduce the risk of infection post-surgery.  After the procedure, it is highly recommended that you practice excellent oral hygiene, avoid habits that may damage teeth such as chewing on ice and keep up with routine checkups.

To schedule an appointment with a dentist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5521.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Traveling With Medication

Tips for traveling with medication Preparing for a flight often requires careful planning and packing. When traveling with medication, knowing airport rules ahead of time can help you to pack correctly and minimize setbacks on your trip.

It is important that you follow these tips provided by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to avoid delays in your travel time or confiscation of your medication:

  • Confirm that your prescription is legal at your destination; some medications that are allowed in the United States are prohibited in other countries.
  • Learn state requirements for the labeling of prescription medication. States have individual laws of which travelers must comply.
  • You can bring unlimited amounts of your medication in pill or solid form, as long as it is screened. Medications are typically screened by X-ray; however, if you do want them X-rayed you may ask to have them inspected instead. This request must be made before your medication enters the X-ray tunnel.
  • You are allowed to bring liquid medication in carry-on bags in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities.
  • If traveling with liquid medication, you must inform the inspecting officer at the start of the screening checkpoint process. Additional screening will be required and you may be asked to open the container.
  • Supplies associated with medication such as syringes, pumps, IV bags or needles must undergo screening.

Packing appropriately for your trip can make traveling with medication less complicated. It is highly recommended that you check the TSA’s website, www.tsa.gov, for updates as the current rules can change.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Much Water Should You Drink During Exercise

Physical medicine and rehabilitation in Flushing NYStaying hydrated while exercising is very important, especially during the hotter months when we tend to lose more water by sweating. The best way to hydrate our bodies is to drink water, as it helps to prevent dehydration.

While drinking water greatly benefits our bodies, consuming too much can have adverse effects, one of which is hyponatremia.  This condition occurs when the blood becomes excessively diluted from drinking too much water, dangerously reducing sodium levels in our bodies.  Hyponatremia can result in symptoms such as nausea, fatigue, headaches, and in severe but rare cases, death.  It is important to follow proper hydration guidelines to avoid these symptoms.

According to Harvard Health, four to six cups of fluid daily is generally recommended for most people to consume. While exercising, The American Council on Exercise recommends drinking:

  • Seventeen to 20 ounces of fluid, 2 to 3 hours before  working out
  • Another 8 ounces, 20 to 30 minutes before starting your workout
  • Seven to 10 ounces, every 10 to 20 minutes while exercising
  • Eight ounces post workout

General recommendations are based on weight and gender. They may vary with each individual. It is  also important to keep in mind, that individuals with certain health conditions such as kidney or liver disease may retain too much fluid and should consult their physician

If you are uncertain about how much water you should drink per day or while exercising, speak with your doctor.  He or she will be able to provide more specific guidelines.

To speak with a doctor at  Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ringworm

Ringworm- skin doctor queens new yorkRingworm is a common infection that results in circular-shaped rashes on the skin.  Contrary to what its name suggests ringworm is not caused by a worm but rather a fungus that thrives on multiple surfaces.

Ringworm can appear on just about any part of the body.  However, based on the location of the rash, it may be categorized by a different name.  For example, ringworm on the feet is known as athlete’s foot and ringworm on the groin is known as jock itch.

Symptoms of ringworm vary based on location. They can include:

  • Patches of hair loss
  • Scaling of the scalp
  • A small pimple on the scalp that becomes larger in size over time
  • Thickened, discolored or brittle nails
  • Flat-ring shaped rashes
  • Itching
  • Red, peeling, itchy skin between the toes
  • Red spots on the inner sides of the thigh

Ringworm is highly contagious and can be spread by:

  • Skin-to-skin contact with an infected person
  • Contact with an infected animal
  • Contact with objects or surfaces touched by an infected person
  • Prolonged contact with soil that is infected

Some people are more at risk for transmission than others.  Your chances of contracting an infection increases if you:

  • Are in close contact with animals or people who are infected
  • Share linens or clothing with someone who is infected
  • Live in a warm climate
  • Wear tight or restrictive clothing
  • Have a weakened immune system

You can reduce your risk of getting ringworm by:

  • Keeping your skin clean and dry
  • Avoid sharing linens and clothing with an infected person
  • Washing your hands after playing with pets with ringworm

Your doctor can diagnose ringworm by examining the infected area.   You may receive a prescription for antifungal medications that may include lotions, creams or pills to treat the infection. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Does Adding More Protein To Your Diet Really Build Muscle?

Nutritionist in Flushing QueensIt is common for people to increase their intake of protein when building muscle. This may be the result of a common misconception that adding more protein to your diet helps to increase muscle mass. The truth is, excessive amounts of protein can do your body more harm than good (Experts recommend that anywhere between 10 to 30% of your diet should include protein).

An excessive amount of protein in your diet can have the following harmful effects:

  • A buildup of toxic ketones
  • An increase in the risk of dehydration
  • An elevation in blood lipids
  • An increase in the risk of heart disease
  • Protein being converted to fat

Another misconception about diet and building muscle is that carbohydrates should be avoided.  In fact, adequate amounts of good carbohydrates, found in whole grain bread and cereals can provide the energy needed to exercise and help your body process protein (Dietary guidelines suggest around 55% of your calories each day should come from carbohydrates).

To achieve the best results when building muscle, you must combine strength training exercises along with a diet that includes the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, water, fruits and vegetables.

If you have questions about your diet and nutrition, please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment with a dietitian at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Esophageal Cancer

esophageal cancer Esophageal cancer is a disease that develops when cancer forms in the esophagus- the long, hollow, muscular tube that runs from your throat to your stomach.   The esophagus helps to move food and liquids to your stomach after you swallow.

Cancer of the esophagus is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. It occurs more often in men than in women.

Although the cause for esophageal cancer is unclear, research indicates that the disease may develop as a result of damaged DNA in the cells that line the esophagus.  It is also believed that chronic irritation to the esophagus is a contributing factor.   Other factors that may increase the risk of developing the disease include:

  • Being obese
  • Having GERD
  • Having Barrett’s esophagus( A serious complication of GERD)
  • Having bile reflux
  • Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Undergoing radiation treatments to the chest or upper abdomen

Esophageal cancer may not have symptoms in its early stages.  However, as the disease progresses the following symptoms may occur:

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Chronic cough
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Indigestion and heartburn

Cancer of the esophagus can be diagnosed by performing a series of tests and procedures that include genomic testing, imaging scans, endoscopy or biopsy. If it is found that you have developed esophageal cancer, your doctor may request further testing to determine the stage of cancer.

Treatment for esophageal cancer is based on stage, overall health and your preferences for care. Immunotherapy, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy or interventional radiology are some of the approaches that your doctor may discuss with you.

If you are experiencing symptoms of esophageal cancer, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5486 to make an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Oral Cancer Awareness Month

According to the American Academy of Oral Medicine (AAOM), “Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (cancer of the mouth and upper throat) collectively kill nearly one person every hour of every day of the year.” However, mortality rates can be reduced through early detection.

One of the best ways to detect oral cancer at an early stage is by getting regular screenings. Dental associations such as the Academy of General Dentistry, recommend seeing your dentist at least once a year for a thorough examination-especially if you are at risk for developing the disease. You may be at risk if you:

  • Drink excessive amounts of alcohol on a regular basis
  • Contracted the human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Use tobacco products
  • Chew betel quid
  • Previously had oral cancer
  • Have a weakened immune system
  • Have poor oral health
  • Have a family history of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)- the most common type of oral cancer

Those at risk should be mindful of the signs and symptoms of oral cancer which include:

  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you close your mouth
  • A white, red or black discoloration of the tissues inside the mouth
  • A growth or lump inside the mouth
  • Lip sores that do not heal
  • Hoarseness or soreness of the throat that do not resolve
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Loose teeth
  • Mouth pain
  • Earaches

It is strongly recommended that you see a dentist if these symptoms persist for more than two weeks.

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month; during this time the AAOM and other dental health associations across the United States are urging the public to schedule an oral cancer examination. If you are at risk for developing the disease please remember to check for signs and symptoms in between dental visits.

To schedule an appointment with a dentist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5521.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

ACL Injury

One of the most common knee injuries people receive is tearing or spraining their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

The ACL is a major ligament that helps to hold the bones together in the knee. This band of connective tissue also helps to keep the knee stable by limiting joint mobility while doing activities such as walking or running.

Injury to the ACL typically occurs among individuals who participate in sports or fitness activities where rapid pivoting or turning is common.  Injuries can also happen when someone:

  • Lands awkwardly after jumping
  • Stops suddenly
  • Receives a direct blow to the knee
  • Slows down or changes direction suddenly

Women are more prone to ACL injuries than men. This is due to differences in anatomy such as wider pelvises in women. Others who may have an increased risk for injury include those who:

  • Are participating in certain sports such as basketball, soccer, football, skiing or gymnastics
  • Do not participate in conditioning training
  • Have a previously torn  ACL
  • Wear footwear that does not fit properly

Individuals who receive an ACL injury may experience symptoms that include:

  • A “popping” sound at the time of injury
  • Feeling a sudden shift in the knee joint
  • Rapid swelling
  • Loss of full range of motion
  • Pain

ACL injuries can be prevented by:

  • Strengthening quadriceps and hamstring muscles
  • Crouching and bending at the knees when pivoting
  • Training and conditioning all year round
  • Practicing proper landing techniques when jumping
  • Stretching

A diagnosis of an ACL injury is determined by a physical exam and (or) X-ray, MRI or ultrasound imaging. Treatment varies with severity and may include rehabilitation or surgery.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Poison Prevention Week Tips

poison prevention-154210048This week is  National Poison Prevention Week. Did you know that every year more than 2 million poison-related injuries and deaths are reported in the United States and more than 90 percent of these cases occur in the home?

The majority of poison-related accidents occurs among children but can be prevented by taking the proper precautions to store, dispose or conceal items that contribute to these incidents.

The following safety tips are recommended by The American Association of Poison Control Centers and can help you reduce the risk of an accident your home:

  1. Place the Poison Help number in a place that is easily accessible or viewable. That number is 1 (800) 222-1222. Calls are free, confidential, and answered by experts at all times.
  2. Safely store these substances in cabinets with childproof locks or in child-resistant containers:
  • Medications
  • Vitamins
  • Tobacco products, especially liquid nicotine
  • Laundry and cleaning supplies
  • Alcohol
  • Pesticides or insect repellants
  • Hand sanitizers
  • Small batteries
  1. Read medication labels properly before administering.
  2. Never call medication “candy” to encourage children to take it.
  3. Avoid taking medications in front of young children.
  4. Do not use food storage containers to store harmful products such as detergents or pesticides.

While practicing these guidelines should be routine, we invite you to use Poison Prevention Awareness Week as a reminder to ensure that your home is poison safe.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Does Weight Loss Surgery Affect Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most common form of diabetes.  Complications from this disease can lead to more serious health conditions such as hypertension and stroke.  Type 2 diabetes can also lead to premature death; in fact, studies show that the risk of premature death can be increased by as much as 80% in patients with T2DM.

According to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, “Obesity is the primary cause for type 2 diabetes.” Therefore, most patients diagnosed with T2DM can improve their health by losing weight.

One of the most effective forms of weight loss treatments for obesity is bariatric surgery.  It has been found that undergoing bariatric surgery and adhering to a prescribed diabetes treatment plan can improve blood sugar levels and cause remission of the disease in most patients. The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery reports that “Nearly all individuals who have bariatric surgery show improvement in their diabetic state.” Surgery may improve type 2 diabetes in approximately 90% of patients by either lowering blood sugar, reducing the dosage of medication needed or improving health problems associated with diabetes.

The two most popular bariatric surgeries are the sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass procedures. In the sleeve gastrectomy procedure, a large portion of the stomach is removed and a smaller, new stomach in the shape of a tube or “sleeve” is created.  During bypass surgery, a new small stomach pouch is created, and a section of the small bowel is bypassed. Both surgeries can offer excellent long-term results and positive outcomes in most patients. They are typically performed laparoscopically, utilizing a minimally invasive approach.   Laparoscopic surgery can offer patients several benefits including shorter hospital stays, shorter recovery time and less scarring.

Although bariatric surgery is considered safe, it is important that patients understand the risks of surgery. As with most major surgical procedures, the risks can include bleeding or other complications.

At Flushing Hospital’s Bariatric Surgical Center, procedures are performed utilizing minimally invasive techniques including robotic surgery. The Center also provides many compassionately delivered services to help patients succeed in every step of their weight loss journey including close physician monitoring, pre and post-surgical psychological evaluations, personalized diet and nutritional counseling as well as ongoing education and support groups.

For more information about the Bariatric Surgery Services at Flushing Hospital or procedures performed by our doctors, please call 718-670-8908

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.