Weight Loss Solutions for the New Year

One of the most common resolutions people make at the beginning of each year is to lose weight. However, many people may have a hard time sticking to this goal if they cannot find a weight loss method that offers long-term results and maintains a balanced, healthy quality of life.

The right approach to weight loss may be different for everyone, but a natural approach that emphasizes consistency and moderation when it comes to your diet and exercise may offer the results you’re looking for. When you attempt to lose weight through this method, you should:

  • Incorporate single-ingredient and high-protein foods into your diet
  • Cut back on fried food, fast food, and other processed foods
  • Drink more water (about 15.5 cups per day for men and 11.5 cups per day for women)
  • Reduce your intake of liquid calories through soda, sugary drinks, alcohol, and other beverages
  • Perform at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise (about 22 minutes each day if you exercise throughout the entire week) and at least one set of resistance exercises that target all major muscle groups

While most people may achieve their weight loss goals by following these guidelines throughout the year, they may not be sufficient for people with extreme obesity or those who suffer from chronic conditions related to obesity. Certain prescription medications recommended by a doctor can often help, but for some people, bariatric surgery may be the right path forward.

Bariatric surgery is performed on the stomach and intestines to reduce food absorption. It includes several different types of procedures, such as:

  • Sleeve gastrectomy
  • Gastric bypass
  • Gastric revision
  • Lap band
  • Duodenal switch
  • Obalon balloon

Bariatric surgery is best suited for people who are:

  • Over a body mass index (BMI) of 40
  • Over 100 lbs. above their ideal weight
  • Experiencing severe pain in weight-bearing joints
  • Suffer from obesity-related chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, sleep apnea, or degenerative joint disease

At Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Bariatric Surgery Center, procedures are performed using the da Vinci robotic surgical platform. This technology allows for a minimally invasive approach and reduces scarring, pain, and recovery time. To schedule an appointment and learn more about our approach to bariatric surgery, please call us at 718-408-6977 or 718-670-8908.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Which Drug-Free Dieting Strategy is Right for You?

Rapid weight loss, though not typically recommended as a healthy method of slimming down and keeping weight off, is sometimes necessary for severely obese people. In many cases, this kind of weight loss is overseen by a doctor and aided by prescription medications such as Ozempic, a drug primarily intended to treat diabetes.

However, recent shortages in this drug and others that are typically used to medically assist rapid weight loss may restrict availability for people trying to reach a healthy weight, making it necessary to consider other potential options.

Two particular dieting strategies, with the assistance of a doctor, can offer a safe means of rapidly losing weight when necessary and preserving your health. These include:

Intermittent Fasting: This strategy involves alternating between eating on a regular schedule and severely restricting calories. One popular example, the 16:8 approach, involves eating within an eight-hour window each day and fasting for the remaining 16. Another, the 5:2 approach, involves eating only one 500-600 calorie meal for two days of the week, eating normally for the remaining five days.

Low-Calorie Dieting: A low-calorie diet involves restricting daily calories to between 1000-1200 for women and 1200-1600 for men. An even stricter version of this approach can restrict calories to as little as 800 per day and is often used before weight loss surgery and can result in as much five pounds of weight loss per week.

Consult your doctor to determine whether these approaches are safe for you. They should be performed in conjunction with a regular exercise routine and a healthy, balanced diet. If you’re considering including herbal remedies or other types of supplements into your diet, talk to your doctor to determine whether these may cause complications with any foods you typically eat or medications you take.

If diet and exercise aren’t enough to help you adequately lose weight, other options are also available. Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a non-invasive FDA-approved weight loss procedure that can help patients who are not candidates for bariatric surgery. For more information, please call (718) 670-8909. If you are a candidate for bariatric surgery, you can receive more information by calling (718) 670-6977.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Three Tips for Encouraging Exercise in Kids

Over one-fifth of children throughout the United States experience obesity, putting them at risk for serious chronic conditions such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, joint and breathing problems, and type two diabetes. This is partially due to the fact that less than a quarter of children between the ages of six and 17 engage in at least an hour of physical activity each day.

Regular physical activity is one of the most effective tools for preventing childhood obesity. It also offers additional benefits such as improved cognitive performance and classroom behavior.

There are many recreational options for children to choose from. Unfortunately, non-physical activities such as video games and social media compete for their attention and are more easily accessible than physical activities. Therefore, it’s important that parents make physical activities as equally appealing and engaging as possible. Here are a few effective ways this can be achieved:

  • Focus on fun: Kids are much more likely to stick with something that they find enjoyable. The desire to become more skilled, play with friends, or feel a greater sense of self-confidence may all factor into this enjoyment. If they’d like to explore an activity that they believe may be fun or are already enjoying something they’re starting to participate in, encourage them to keep it up and do what you can to facilitate it.

 

  • Try different activities with your child: Kids may not have much interest in sports or other activities that have no previous positive connotations in their minds. Trying out a few different activities with them yourself not only provides a reference point, but allows for bonding opportunities with you and all who participate.

 

  • Make exercise rewarding: Even if you succeed in getting your child interested in a particular activity, they may devote too much time to it at the expense of other obligations such as academics. Emphasize that recreational activity, while important, is a reward for keeping up with prioritized obligations.

If your child is experiencing medical problems preventing them from participating in physical activities, you can schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 670-3007.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy School Lunch Tips

As parents, we do our best to make sure that our children eat healthy when they are with us. This includes preparing well-balanced meals for them and saying “no” when they want to overindulge on junk food.

Keeping an eye on what our kids eat can be a difficult enough task when they are in our presence, but the task is even harder when they aren’t – like when they are in school.

Most children spend an average of six hours a day in school. It is estimated that they consume half of their daily caloric intake while at school, therefore it is important to make that they receive proper nutrition during this time.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) indicates that childhood obesity is a growing problem in the United States. The number of children and teens classified as obese has tripled since the 1970s and it is now estimated that one out of every five school-age children in the U.S. fits this criteria.

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and Jamaica Hospital wants to raise awareness about this growing problem and the serious consequences associated with it. Obesity puts children at greater risk of developing many other chronic health conditions and diseases, such as asthma, sleep apnea, bone and joint problems, and type 2 diabetes. They also have more risk factors for heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Children with obesity can be bullied and teased more than their normal-weight peers and they are also more likely to suffer from social isolation, depression, and lower self-esteem.

The good news is the childhood obesity is preventable. One way to reduce your child’s chances of becoming obese is to make sure they eat healthy at school. So, whether your child packs lunch or their school provides lunch for them, there are a few things you can do to make sure they are eating healthy during the school day.

SCHOOL LUNCH TIPS
If your child opts to receive the school provided lunch, do your homework and make sure their school is offering a healthy menu.  Many school districts across the country have changed their lunch menu to meet the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) standards. This includes providing children with the appropriate food portions with a concentration on more fruits and vegetables, increased whole grains and fat-free or low-fat options.

Also, check your school’s website as it often lists the menu for the month. If your child is a picky eater or has food allergies, knowing in advance what days he or she may not eat school lunch will help you prepare an alternate plan.  If getting out the door in the morning is a problem, consider signing your child up for school breakfast too as starting the day off with a good breakfast has many benefits.

PACKING LUNCH TIPS
If your child prefers to bring lunch from home make sure to have a variety of healthy options at home for them to bring to school. This includes fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and snacks with reduced saturated fat, trans fat and sodium.  Sometimes coming up with healthy options can be a challenge; if so, there are many websites that offer a variety of ideas for parents of even the most finicky eaters.

To help ensure that you plan wisely, avoid packing lunches in the morning when you might be in a rush. Instead, try preparing them the night before when you have more time to select the healthiest options. It is also important to make sure to have foods packed at appropriate temperatures. This may include inserting ice packs for yogurt or other dairy items or a thermos for chicken soup or other hot lunch options.

It is important to remember that whether parents choose to have their children buy school lunch or pack a lunch for them, they need to set a good example in the home by eating healthy themselves. Parents should also take the time to teach their children about what foods are healthy and why it is important to maintain a well-balanced diet.

Working together with your school system, you can ensure that your child will receive the proper nutrition this school year, which will benefit both their body and their mind.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips to Navigate the Holiday Season And Keeping Your Waistline Intact

Getting through the holidays without putting on extra pounds can be a real challenge. There are many opportunities to go overboard. However, just because the temptations are greater, doesn’t mean you have to fall victim to the traps of holiday weight gain

Here are some tips to help you navigate the holiday season while keeping your waistline intact:

  • Control portions.Research has shown that the more food we’re served, the more we will eat even if we don’t particularly like what we’re eating. Try to minimize the size of your portions, especially with calorie-heavy foods like gravy, eggnog, and desserts.
  • Keep moving. Exercise has proven to be important for weight loss.  Exercise is also essential in helping you cope with stress and increases your level of energy, giving you a boost when trying to tackle that long holiday “to-do” list. Even if you don’t have time to get to the gym, try to squeeze in 10-minute intervals of activity throughout the day.
  • Weigh in regularly.Checking the scale at least once a week is a true test for maintenance. Remember to do this first thing in the morning, in your nightclothes, and after emptying your bladder.
  • Have a healthy breakfast.Numerous studies confirm that those who have breakfast eat fewer calories throughout the day. Eating breakfast also powers up the brain and boosts metabolism.
  • Put it on a plate.It’s hard to keep track of how much food you’re eating when you nibble without using a plate. Serving meals and snacks on a plate will help you avoid munching and consuming extra calories.
  • If you don’t love it, don’t eat it. Trying new foods is always exciting but why waste calories if you don’t love what you are eating? One bite is usually enough to tell whether you love it or not. If something is not for you, just leave it on your plate and use the extra calories for something you love.
  • Take a few bites. A piece of pecan pie or glass of eggnog can set you back by more than 400 calories. To avoid gaining weight, enjoy just a few bites or sips of these rich treats.
  • Savor every bite.Sit down, relax, and take your time to experience the flavors, textures, and aroma of each food. Eating slowly will help you enjoy the meal and will give your brain time to signal to your stomach that you’re

By following these tips you can enjoy all the delicious joys that are associated with the holiday seasons and not suffer the usual consequences.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summer Weight Loss Tips For Kids

Is your child at risk of gaining weight this summer?

We consider summer to be a time when kids run around, go swimming and generally remain active. With all this physical activity, it is a common belief that children keep weight off or maybe even lose a few pounds in the summer, but that is not the case. There are many reasons why parents are now noticing that their children are actually gaining weight during the summer.

The rate of childhood obesity has tripled in America in recent decades. Now, one out of three children in this country is considered overweight or obese. When are children gaining the most weight?  Recent studies have revealed that during the summer, the rate of weight gain in children is double that of the rest of the year. Why?

One of the biggest contributing factors is that children today live a more sedentary lifestyle. During the school year, children participate in fitness programs, both during recess and in physical education classes. Without a regimented exercise program, children opt to spend their free time playing video games or watching television.

Another factor in summer weight gain is the foods children have access to in their home. In an effort to fight obesity and promote healthy eating habits, many schools provide healthy alternatives for lunches and snacks during the year. During the summer, however, kids have access to whatever snacks are in the home. Kids will often choose unhealthy snacks, such as cookies, chips, and soda, if they are available to them.

In an effort to reverse this trend, Jamaica Hospital offers the following summer healthy living tips for your kids:

• Stock your home with healthy food options like yogurt, carrots, or summer fruits like peaches, berries, or melons.

• Make water the beverage of choice. Juices and sodas are high in calories and low in nutrients. To make water more flavorful, consider adding fruit slices or berries.

• Limit TV and video game usage. It will force kids to become more physically active and prevent them from enticing junk food commercials..

• Walk more. Everyone can do it. Incorporate regular family walks to the park or around the neighborhood.

• Be inventive. Not every child is interested in formal team sports, but every kid loves to run around. Encourage activities like hopscotch, jump rope or a simple game of “tag.”

• Be a role mode. Children often take cues from their parent’s eating habits so if you want your kids to eat healthier, you should eat healthier

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summer Weight Loss Tips For Kids

Is your child at risk of gaining weight this summer?

We consider summer to be a time when kids run around, go swimming and generally remain active. With all this physical activity, it is a common belief that children keep weight off or maybe even lose a few pounds in the summer, but that is not the case. There are many reasons why parents are now noticing that their children are actually gaining weight during the summer.

The rate of childhood obesity has tripled in America in recent decades. Now, one out of three children in this country is considered overweight or obese. When are children gaining the most weight?  Recent studies have revealed that during the summer, the rate of weight gain in children is double that of the rest of the year. Why?

One of the biggest contributing factors is that children today live a more sedentary lifestyle. During the school year, children participate in fitness programs, both during recess and in physical education classes. Without a regimented exercise program, children opt to spend their free time playing video games or watching television.

Another factor in summer weight gain is the foods children have access to in their home. In an effort to fight obesity and promote healthy eating habits, many schools provide healthy alternatives for lunches and snacks during the year. During the summer, however, kids have access to whatever snacks are in the home. Kids will often choose unhealthy snacks, such as cookies, chips, and soda if they are available to them.

In an effort to reverse this trend, Flushing Hospital offers the following summer healthy living tips for your kids:

• Stock your home with healthy food options like yogurt, carrots, or summer fruits like peaches, berries, or melons.

• Make water the beverage of choice. Juices and sodas are high in calories and low in nutrients. To make water more flavorful, consider adding fruit slices or berries.

• Limit TV and video game usage. It will force kids to become more physically active and prevent them from enticing junk food commercials.

• Walk more. Everyone can do it. Incorporate regular family walks to the park or around the neighborhood.

• Be inventive. Not every child is interested in formal team sports, but every kid loves to run around. Encourage activities like hopscotch, jump rope or a simple game of “tag.”

• Be a role model. Children often take cues from their parent’s eating habits so if you want your kids to eat healthier, you should eat healthier

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Five Best Tips for Putting Your Best Fork Forward to Shed the Winter Pounds

Healthy resolutions for the New Year 2017.

Did you know that March is National Nutrition Month?  Every year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics generates a nutrition, education and information campaign.  This year’s message is “Put Your Best Fork Forward.”

Each person has the tools to make healthy dietary choices.  Now  that winter is coming to an end, and spring is approaching, it is a wonderful time to reflect on our current habits and lifestyle and decide which tools we will use to shed some excess weight gained over the winter months.

Tool #1 – Balance

  • Visit Choose My Plate at https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ – Use the “my plate” method of ½ plate non starchy veggies, ¼ plate protein, ¼ plate fiber rich carbohydrate to balance your nutrients throughout the day.
  • Drink water or mild instead of sweetened beverages (soda or juice).
  • Eat healthy snacks, such as fruits/nuts with yogurt or crackers with peanut butter.
  • Substitute processed or artificially flavored food items with natural unprocessed foods. By skipping the cookies and having a piece of fruit, you will get more vitamins and fiber allowing your body to feel more energized throughout the day.

Tool #2 – Let’s get Physical

Physical activity, in any form, is imperative for managing weight. Some ways to get more active are:

  • Consider non weight bearing exercises such as using resistance bands for building muscle and increasing flexibility, stationary bike or water aerobics.
  • Walking 10,000 steps per day is equivalent to walking five miles! Aim to achieve as many steps as possible throughout the day such as parking your car a little further from your destination, taking the stairs instead of the elevator and partaking in walking breaks, especially if you are sitting for most of the day.
  • March gives us extra daylight, so the best way to utilize this extra time is by being active. Activities such as walking, jogging, gardening, swimming and yoga are perfect ways to spend 30 minutes doing an outside activity.

Tool #3 – Reduce Stress

  • Everyone has stress which can obstruct weight loss. Stress increased the hormone called cortisol, which can contribute to weight gain.  Stress also contributes to emotional eating and other damaging behaviors.
  • It is important to ask for help and have support to get through the daily stressors of life. Consider support groups, meditation, coloring, knitting or spending time with a loved one to relieve the stressors in your daily life and help you stay focused and on track of your goals and progress.

Tool #4 – Be SMART About Your Goals

By setting SMART goals, results are greater!  SMART goals encompass five parameters to make the goal more productive:

S          is the SPECIFICS of the goal.  Is the goal definable?

M         is the MEASURABILITY of the goal. Is it possible to track/measure progress?

A          is ATTAINABILITY of the goal.  Is the goal a reasonable one ?

R          is RELEVENCY of the goal.  Is the goal worthwhile and will it meet your needs?

T          is TIMELINESS of the goal.  How much time can you give to accomplishing goals?

Tool #5 – Track Your Progress

  • Keep a diary or journal and record your progress and shortcomings.
  • Keep a food log and track your dietary intake.
  • “There’s an App for that” – There are so many wonderful Apps for goal setting and tracking caloric intake, physical activity, etc., utilize the technology on your smart phone or tablet to monitor your progress.

This article was submitted by Sadia Tahir Khan MS, RD and Michelle Hill, RD, CDN, CDE, Food and Nutrition Department of Flushing Hospital Medical Center

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Resolve to Eat Right

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With the holidays drawing to a close, it will soon be the time for resolutions.  Why not make eating right a part of your resolution.

Eating right doesn’t have to be complicated.  You can begin with a simple shift to lean meats, fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates into your nutritional regimen while lessening your intake of processed foods, white flour and sugar.

For more information on eating right, contact the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Ambulatory Care Center at  718-670-5486 to speak with a nutritionist.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Low Sugar, Easy Bake Oatmeal Cherry Cookies Cookies

oatmeal-cherry-cookie-ts-133892226

With the holidays approaching, we are talking about food and baking much for often than any other time of the year.

Colleagues are bringing in their homemade bakes cookies These comforting and joyous morsels make great snacks and are sweet enough to satisfy the sweetest of sweet tooths.

But, oh the sugar and calories!

With regard to calories and nutrition, cookies:

  • Depending on their ingredients, can have varying number of calories.
  • Most of these calories are associated with sugar and fats used to make them.
  • The nutrients  are also dependent on the ingredients used.
  • The nutritional details  are usually available on the nutritional label on the back of the cookie box.

If you are a “cookie monster” and want to indulge without any of the guilt, try these Oatmeal Cherry Cookies from Prevention.com

Oatmeal Cherry Cookies

1 c whole grain pastry flour
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
½ c packed brown sugar
⅓ c granulated sugar
¼ c unsweetened applesauce
2 Tbsp canola oil
1 lg egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
1½ c old-fashioned rolled oats
¾ c dried cherries

1. PREHEAT the oven to 375°F. Coat 2 large baking sheets with cooking spray.
2. COMBINE the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt in a small bowl.
3. COMBINE the brown sugar and granulated sugar, applesauce, oil, egg, and vanilla in a large bowl. Stir until well blended. Add the flour mixture and stir until combined. Stir in the oats and cherries.
4. DROP the batter by rounded teaspoonfuls, 2″ apart, onto the prepared baking sheets. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until golden brown. Let stand on the baking sheets for 2 minutes before removing to a rack to cool completely.

NUTRITION (per serving) 72 cal, 1.5 g pro, 13.5 g carb, 1.5 g fiber,  7 g sugars, 1.5 g fat, .1 g sat fat, 77.5 mg sodium

PREP TIME: 15 min / COOK TIME: 10 min / TOTAL TIME: 27 min
SERVINGS: 30

Enjoy!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.