Caring For A Loved One With Mental Illness

mental illness, caregiver, depression, bi-polar, panic disorder, anxiety, obessive compulsive disorder, depression

Clinical diagnosis for mental illness such as schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression can be difficult.  It is especially difficult when it is a loved one that is experiencing these conditions.

When a loved one has mental illness, family members can often feel emotions of embarrassment, anger, worry, self-blame or grief. Parents, specifically, can feel powerless over the disease and at a loss for what the best course of treatment for their child.

The focus becomes the person with mental illness, but studies have shown that it is just as important to maintain your own health while caring for a person with mental illness.

Some ways to maintain your health while being a caretaker are:

  • Maintain relationships with other family members
  • Seek professional support for yourself and your family
  • Participate in groups and family sessions with your loved one
  • Make time for yourself
  • Ask for help to lighten your responsibilities
  • Address one issue as a time to avoid burnout

As the caregiver, you are the tie that keeps everything together.  The more educated you are about the disease your loved one is facing and the time you set aside for yourself will be what helps you navigate the obstacles.

If your loved one has mental illness and you are seeking professional help as a caregiver, call the Mental Health Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5562 to schedule an appointment.

For more information for caring for a loved one with mental illness, visit American Phychological Association https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/serious-mental-illness.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Tongue Scraping Good For Your Oral Health?

tongue scraper, oral health, dental, oral care, bad breath, cavities, gum disease

In addition to brushing, many people are adding tongue scraping as a way to remove extra particles from the surface of the tongue. This technique is safely done with a small round tool usually made from plastic or metal that gently glides across the surface of the tongue removing any buildup of bacteria, dead cells and debris.

This buildup can cause:

  • Your sense of taste to lessen
  • A white coat to appear on top of your tongue
  • An increase in the likelihood of a stale odor (bad breath) to emanate from your mouth
  • An increased in the likelihood of cavities and gum disease.

By using a tongue scraper as part of your daily oral hygiene, many of these conditions can be eradicated.

Consistency in oral hygiene is the key to success.  If you institute a regimen of brushing and flossing your teeth, as well as scraping your tongue regularly, you may find that your overall oral health will improve.

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center please call 718-670-5521 to schedule an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June Is National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

According to the Coalition for Headache and Migraine Patients (CHAMP), June is recognized by the federal government as National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month.

More than 38 million people in the United States experience migraines or some type of tension headache with 2 -3 million of them experiencing chronic migraines.

The exact causes of migraines are unknown.  People with migraine or tension headaches may have a tendency to be affected by certain triggers such as fatigue, bright lights, weather changes and hypertension.

Some symptoms of migraine or tension headaches are:

  • Throbbing pain, numbness, weakness
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to sound
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Vertigo
  • Mood changes
  • Neck pain
  • Vision changes

Treatment for migraine or tension headaches depends on the how often or how severe the headache is, the level of disability your headache may cause and contributing medical conditions you may have.

Over the counter medications such as anti-nausea or Ibuprofen may help with more minor episodes, but if you are experiencing multiple headaches per month lasting more than 12 hours, over the counter medications aren’t helping and your migraine symptoms include numbness or weakness, it is best to consult your physician.

If you are experiencing painful migraine or tension headaches, the Ambulatory Care Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center has convenient hours and days of operation.  To schedule an appointment, call 718-670-5486.

To learn more about migraines and tension headaches visit – https://migraine.com/migraine-statistics/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines On Cyril Reid

May’s Employee Spotlight shines on Cyril Reid, better known to all as “CJ,” a Third Cook at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) cafeteria.

Each morning, CJ is at the server grilling delicious breakfast fare for visitors and employees.  He is well known for his vegetable omelets.  He takes great pride and care in the preparation and presentation of each dish prepared.

Although CJ is a fairly new employee at FHMC, he has quickly developed a positive reputation and following.

When CJ is not at FHMC, he enjoys spending time with his lovely girlfriend, mother, grandmother and siblings.  When they are together CJ shares with them his love for family, basketball and, of course, food.

CJ stated that the most rewarding part of his job is, “Getting compliments from customers telling me that what I served them was delicious.” He tries his very best to make sure that any and all unforeseen obstacles within his control are addressed before he takes his place at the grill station.

For serving it up just right, we shine the Employee Spotlight on Cyril Reid.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do Detox Teas Do More Harm Than Good?

Dieting is never easy, nor is there a “quick fix” for weight loss on the market that comes without some risk.

The latest trend seems to be detox teas.  The active ingredient in most of the teas is caffeine.  Caffeine can produce side effects such as nervousness, stomach irritation, nausea, vomiting, anxiety and agitation, headache, ringing in the ears as well as increased heart and breathing rates.

As an appetite suppressant, products containing caffeine may work for the short term. Often times detox teas that combine caffeine with a diuretic that may trigger a false sense of weight loss since diuretics cause a loss of water weight, not actual body fat.

Additionally, the caffeine in the teas may cause you to have insomnia.  Studies have shown that a lack of sleep can trigger excessive eating and even slow your metabolism causing you to gain weight.

Nutritionists and healthcare professionals agree that there is no magic formula to weight loss.  The best way to plan for weight loss is to start with a visit to your doctor, make healthy food choices, implement portion control when eating and start a light exercise regimen slowly building as your endurance increases.  The formula for keeping the weight off is to retrain your brain so that you can maintain your new healthier lifestyle.

If you are thinking about taking off a few pounds and would like to speak with a health care professional at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight

The Flushing Hospital Medical Center Department (FHMC) Spotlight shines on the Department of Materials Management/Supply Chain.

This group of professionals, led by Director Robert Arbitello, is responsible for the supervision of purchasing decisions with a focus on ensuring their medical facility is properly stocked with the right products and equipment.

They are further tasked with the planning procurement, storage, control and distribution of materials and products throughout the hospital.

For their excellent work FHMC recognizes and congratulates the Department of Materials Management/Supply Chain on being chosen as the Department Spotlight for the month of May!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

April’s Employee Spotlight Shines on Jayne Koerber!

April’s Employee Spotlight shines on Jayne Koerber, clerk and medical transcriber for the Department of Radiology at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).  She has been a valued employee at FHMC for the past 32 years.

On any given day, you will find Jayne answering phones, scheduling patient appointments, verifying insurance eligibility and forwarding radiologic reports to the necessary departments.

Jayne Koerber greets every day with a smile.  She states that the part of her job that is most rewarding is, “Helping patients in our hospital and our community; always treating them with respect and compassion.”

She loves her work at FHMC, although it can be challenging because, “You must be able to multi-task.  The phones are always ringing, patients are coming in for registration and insurance companies call for authorizations all simultaneously.”

Jayne resides with her husband Al.  She has two daughters, Elizabeth and Kristina.  She loves to take long walks, cook and shop.  Some of her other non-work related hobbies are working with charities such as The Lupus Foundation, St. Jude’s Hospital Pemphigus Foundation and the Lustgarten Foundation.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center congratulates Jayne Koerber for receiving April’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding and Returning to Work

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding and working is a challenge you can overcome.

Here are some suggestions designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier:

1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.

2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.

3. Ask if your company provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.

4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care department at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – FHMC SECURITY DEPARTMENT

April’s Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Department Spotlight shines on the Security Department.

Under the leadership of Carmen Altieri, Director, the FHMC security force is tasked with securing the hospital premises, protecting its personnel, patients, and visitors, as well as monitoring the hospital’s closed circuit TV (CCTV), and checking that the proper hospital identification is being displayed on each employee.

“The department creates an environment of safety at FHMC and we are proud of the work we do.”  stated Ms. Altieri.

Congratulations of being April’s Department Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Month

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a condition marked by recurring or alternating bouts of cramps, diarrhea or constipation. It affects an estimated 30 to 45 million people in the United States – or 10 to 15 percent of the population. Despite its prevalence, many people living with this disorder are unaware that they have it and do not receive the necessary treatment and support.

In an attempt to help others gain a better understanding about this condition, April has been designated IBS Awareness Month. During this time, those involved in this effort will look to focus attention on important health messages about IBS diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues.

There are many obstacles in raising awareness about IBS. One of the biggest hurdles is getting people to openly discuss their condition. Even though the disorder is very common, many with IBS are reluctant to openly talk about their symptoms or seek medical care. They may feel uncomfortable discussing their symptoms, even with their doctor, because of social taboos surrounding bowel symptoms.

In addition, IBS is often mischaracterized as a trivial condition, but it is actually one of the most prevalent and burdensome chronic issues reported by patients. IBS has been cited as one of the leading causes of work absenteeism (second only to the common cold) and its symptoms also have a profound impact on the personal and professional activities of those living with it.

Another obstacle that many that IBS encounter is that there is still so much that is unknown about the disease. IBS symptoms result in no damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) system, making it difficult to diagnose. In addition, even though there are many theories regarding what causes IBS, there is no known official cause for the condition.  There is also no official test to diagnose IBS and there is no cure.

In an effort to help those living with IBS, many health care professionals suggest patients learn all that they can about their condition, including identifying those things that seem to make their symptoms worse. Most importantly, people with IBS are encouraged to talk openly with their doctor about IBS so they can help them better manage their condition through improved lifestyle choices and medication therapy aimed to relieve symptoms.

Flushing Hospital is committed to joining the fight to raise awareness and addressing misconceptions about IBS to help those affected get diagnosed and receive appropriate care.

To schedule an appointment to speak with one of Flushing Hospital’s doctors, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.