Healthy Fall Activities

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With temperatures dropping and crisp air abounding; the fall season is a great time to begin a fitness regime.

Some tips for how to start you fall fitness routine are:

Change it up – The fall season is a great season to spend time with family and friends while taking part in physical activities such as walking through apple and pumpkin patches, corn mazes or trails.

Participate in fun runs – The fall season is when organizations plan their fun runs.  You can participate in a 5K, or a turkey trot.  If you get a group together, it can further motivate you.

Appreciate fall foliage – The fall season brings with it lots of colored leaves.  Local parks usually have trails to walk, run or ride a bike on.

Go to a farmer’s market – Fall brings lots of root vegetables into season.  Take a bike ride and stop at local farmer’s markets to pick up some healthy, tasty fruits and veggies.

Rake the lawn – In the fall season, even chores can be a really good workout. Activities such as raking the leaves can provide great cardio exercise.

As you can see, fall offers several opportunities to stay active and create good habits that will last with you throughout the upcoming holiday season and winter months.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Dental Health Hygiene Month

October is National Dental Hygiene Month and Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) would like to bring awareness to a dental hygiene condition that affects most people, gum disease or gingivitis.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), approximately half of the American population has gum disease or symptoms of it. Affecting women and men alike, no one is excluded from this possible diagnosis- even child are susceptible.

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a contagious bacterial infection that affects the gum tissues and bone that supports the teeth.  Many factors can increase the chances of developing gum disease, such as tobacco use, stress, poor diet, or even genetics.  Hardened plaque, called tartar or calculus, that builds up by the gum line can bring about gingivitis and spread into the underlying bone.  It can start slowly without any pain and may go unnoticed until there is pain.

Some of the symptoms of gum disease can include:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums
  • Gums that bleed when brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Metallic taste
  • Chronic bad breath
  • Deep pockets (the space between gums and the teeth)

While practicing good dental hygiene, such as regular flossing and brushing after meals, can help slow the progression of such a disease, it is important to schedule regular dental check-ups to prevent gum disease or its progression.

Unfortunately, many people go to the dentist only when they experience some sort of pain or symptom. Don’t let this happen to you.  Keep on top of your oral health and make an appointment with your dentist every six months for a dental check- up and deep cleaning.  If you would like to make an appointment with a Board Certified Dentist at Flushing Hospital’s Dental Center, call 718-670-5221 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Diana Garcia

September’s Employee Spotlight shines on Diana Garcia, Newborn Nursery RN, AHN, CLC at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Diana is tasked with overseeing the Newborn Nursery Unit, performing newborn assessments and educating mothers and families on how to care for their newborns.

Diana joined the FHMC team in November of 2010.  She is a graduate of Long Island University Brooklyn and proud alum of St. Agnes Academic H.S.

When asked why she is so passionate about her work, Diana responded, “I was looking forward to breastfeeding my first child.  No one taught me how to breastfeed. I thought I was breastfeeding properly, but I wasn’t.” It was that lack of information which caused her son to become jaundiced and placed under phototherapy. This incident caused Diana to be discharged from the hospital before her infant.

That unsettling experience gave birth to why Diana Garcia is so committed to teaching mothers about the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding.

Throughout Diana’s day, she encounters a few challenges.  One of her “personal” challenges is getting mothers who relied on formula to try to breastfeed.  “So many mothers do not have the knowledge on how to breastfeed or the benefits that breastfeeding brings.” This was something Diana wanted to change and has dedicated her professional career to education and encouragement.

Although the breastfeeding journey begins in the hospital, Diana realizes that it is a challenge to maintain exclusivity in breastfeeding, especially when the mother is physically exhausted.  That is why she spends time reinforcing education and reminding the mothers of the benefits

In closing, Diana stated that she is “Honored to work at Flushing Hospital Medical Center because it is a Baby Friendly Hospital.”

For these and so many other reasons, we congratulate Diana Garcia for being September’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fatty Liver Disease

Liver conditions are usually attributed to the excessive consumption of alcohol, viruses or morbid obesity.  However, there is a condition that affects the liver that is caused by none of the aforementioned risk factors.  It is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

NAFLD is diagnosed when the patient has too much fat stored in their liver cells.  Typically, NAFLD causes no noticeable signs or symptoms other than, in some cases, fatigue, pain or tenderness in the upper right portion of the abdomen.

People at risk for NAFLD include those with:

  • High cholesterol
  • High levels of triglycerides in the blood
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity when it is concentrated in the abdomen
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Sleep apnea
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)
  • Hypopituitarism (underactive pituitary gland)

If you have NAFLD, you are at greater risk of developing a more serious condition called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

NASH is a more aggressive form of fatty liver disease that may progress into cirrhosis (scaring of the liver) and ultimately liver failure.

The signs and symptoms of NASH are:

  • Abdominal swelling
  • Enlarged blood vessels beneath the skin’s surface
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Red palms
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)

Although experts do not know exactly what causes NFLD and NASH, for some  it is believed the combination of the health issues listed above may cause excess fat to become toxic to the cells in the liver.  The risk factors cause the liver to inflame and develop scar tissue or cirrhosis.  The treatment for this condition varies.

The best way to reduce your risk of NAFLD is to implement a healthy plant based diet that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats, maintain a healthy weight and, after conferring with your physician, choose an exercise plan that is right for you.

If you are experiencing the signs and symptoms of NAFLD or NASH and the symptoms persist, it is important you seek the advice of a doctor.  If you would like to make an appointment at the Flushing Hospital Medical Center Ambulatory Care Center, call CTA

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pulmonary Fibrosis

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According to the Mayo Clinic, pulmonary fibrosis is a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes thickened, damaged and scarred. This thickened, stiff tissue makes it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As pulmonary fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath.

 

 

Some symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis are:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Dry cough
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Aching muscles and joints
  • Widening and rounding of the tips of the fingers or toes

Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by certain medical conditions, radiation therapy impurities and contaminants such as:

  • Silica dust
  • Asbestos fibers
  • Hard metal dusts
  • Coal dust
  • Grain dust
  • Bird and animal droppings

Unfortunately, pulmonary fibrosis cannot be cured.  There are medications that can help ease symptoms.  In severe cases, a lung transplant may be suggested.

 

If you have the symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis and would like to schedule an appointment with a Pulmonologist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5639

For this and additional information regarding pulmonary fibrosis visit – https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pulmonary-fibrosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20353690

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

August Employee Spotlight – Michael Saavedra

August’s Employee Spotlight shines on Michael A. Saavedra, Lead Material Handler at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Michael has been a valued employee at FHMC for the past 32 years.  First, as a Material Handler and currently as Lead Material Handler, Michael supervises the day to day operations of the store room and receiving.

Michael Saavedra attended New York University, is a motor cycle enthusiast, and through the motorcycle community, raises money for various charitable organizations.

“Working with my great team and supply chain makes my job so much easier.” stated Michael.  “I make it my duty to ensure that all departments are accommodated with the items to help them better serve the patients and the hospital.”

He prides himself on making sure that the inventories are at optimal stock, continually checks expiration dates and cycles out any expired items from being brought to the departments he serves.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center congratulates Michael A. Saavedra for receiving August’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Is Water Good For Your Health?

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Drinking water is often touted as a way to clear the body’s system of unnecessary waste, but it actually has many more benefits.

Studies show that water can:

  1. Lubricate the joints of the body
  2. Help form saliva and mucous
  3. Deliver oxygen throughout the body
  4. Boost skin health and beauty
  5. Cushion the brain, spinal cord and other sensitive tissues
  6. Regulate body temperature
  7. Aid the digestive track
  8. Help maintain blood pressure
  9. Help keep  airways open
  10. Makes minerals and nutrients accessible throughout the body
  11. Prevent kidney damage
  12. Boost performance during exercise
  13. Promote weight loss
  14. Helps prevent hangover

According to the Mayo Clinic, an adequate daily fluid intake is about 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids for men and about 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids for women.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

August is National Immunization Month

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National Immunization Month

The end of summer is approaching and parents and kids are preparing to go back to school. In addition to new clothes, backpacks and books, all school-age children, from preschoolers to college students, need vaccines.

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and today’s vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective public health tools for preventing disease and death. In 2014, he United States experienced a record number of measles cases with 668 cases from 27 states reported to CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). This is the greatest number of cases since measles was eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Despite these recent outbreaks,  many parents are still unclear which vaccines their children should receive or if their children should receive any at all?

Keep a record of what vaccines your child has received and when. Check with your physician to make sure your child’s immunization schedule is current.  By vaccinating your child today, you are not only ensuring their protection against a wide variety of illness, but you are also helping to eradicate these diseases for future generations.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – Flushing Hospital Gift Shop

department spotlight

Anne Marie Dinicola, Manager, Flushing Hospital Gift Shop

When you enter the Gift Shop at Flushing Hospital you will be met by the ever smiling, ever accomodating Anne Marie Denicola, Manager.  The Gift Shop plays an important function by providing a variety of gifts, greeting cards, floral arrangements and toiletries. They also provide carry gift bags, balloons, candy, newspapers, magazines, books, seasonal items, toys and much more.

We thank Anne Marie Denicola for being such a wonderful “Ambassador of Cheer” to our patients, visitors and employees.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Social Anixety and Alcohol Abuse

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According to the Anxiety and Depression Society of America, about 20 percent of people with social anxiety disorder (SAD) also suffer from alcohol abuse or dependence.

Social anxiety is defined as a disorder that is triggered by social situations where your emotions may arise causing you to have difficulty talking to others, fear being unjustly judged by others, become self-conscious while in the company of others or get physically ill at the thought of attending a social event.

By consuming alcohol, you could possibly experience the illusion of reducing the symptoms of SAD, but it can also lead to an additional issue with alcohol dependence and abuse.

For some, alcohol and SAD are a dangerous combination; since alcohol may give you a false sense of calm when in social situations.  Additionally,  it can also you to delay your decision to seek treatment.  It may also interfere with an existing treatment.  While seeming to help quell the anxiety, alcohol can actually worsen the symptoms of SAD.

If you have been diagnosed with SAD and consume alcohol to ease the symptoms, you may experience the following:

  • Drinking more or longer than you intended
  • Have difficulty limiting your consumption of alcohol
  • Experience strong urges to drink
  • Continuing to drink even though your anxiety is increasing

When alcohol is over consumed, it can lead to worsening the symptoms of social anxiety as well as causing:

  • Morning hangovers
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Dehydration
  • Low blood sugar

Most anxiety disorders can be treated in similar ways.  Some effective ways to calm your social anxiety are to sleep regularly, limit the amount of caffeine and alcohol consumed, eat a healthy diet, and implement relaxation methods such as taking deep breaths, keeping a journal, thinking positive thoughts, yoga, painting or listening to soothing music until the anxiety begins to dissipate.

If these methods are not effective, you may want to seek professional help.  If you have uncontrolled social anxiety disorder and are compensating with alcohol, you may want to speak with a mental health and addiction specialist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Mental Health Center.  Call 718-670-4416 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.