How to Manage Your Child’s Holiday Expectations

Now that Thanksgiving has past, we have shifted our focus to the holiday gift-giving season. 

Odds are, you are being bombarded with marketing materials focused on “the perfect gifts” for your children.  With so many products to choose from, children are likely to create “I Need That” lists that are always growing and may exceed your budget.

As a parent, you may want to fulfill all your children’s wants’ however; doing so may greatly affect your finances.  The last thing you want to do is put yourself in debt as a result of buying above your holiday means.  It can be challenging to maintain your financial health while filling your children’s stocking with the gifts they’ve longed for. 

According to marriagekidsandmoney.com , the first step to managing your children’s gift expectations is to set a realistic budget.  Let children know the precise dollar amount there is to spend; even if Santa is part of your holiday celebration, you can have the same conversation, by telling your child that Santa also has a budget.  This can provide structure and guidelines for making their lists.

Setting a budget can be beneficial, as children can:

  • Learning to prioritize
  • Have a sense of control over purchases
  • Learn to make responsible decisions when striving to stay within the budget
  • Learn the difference between what is needed and what is wanted.

After establishing the budget, you can work with your children to show them financially responsible ways of obtaining items on their lists by using coupon codes or waiting for sale days. All of this can help your child to be a more responsible gift getter.

Financial lessons are important for children to learn, but it is equally as important that they are taught the most important lesson of the season – the value of gathering together with the ones you love to make priceless memories.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Leona DesMoulin

Novembers Employee Spotlight shines on Leona DesMoulin, MHC, CASAC-T, Office Manager for the Department of Psychiatry and Addiction Services in the Administrative office.

During her 13 year tenure at Flushing Hospital, Leona has had the title of Office Manager in the hospital’s administrative office, the Reflections Chemical Dependence Clinic, and currently the Psychiatry Administrative office.

On any given day, Leona’s job description includes working with the Administrator, Chairman and Associate Chairman as well as other members of the department on multiple projects.  Her responsibilities include: keeping the administrative, clinical, regulatory, performance improvement, incident and risk management functions and processes up to date.

Leona is dedicated to her field and has received a Master’s in Healthcare Administration and is a Certified Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor trainee.  She anticipates becoming more and more involved in the department’s Opioid Overdose Prevention Project.

Of all her titles, accomplishments, certifications and degrees, Leona DesMoulin’s favorite title is Mom. “I have one daughter who is currently a Registered Nurse in Orthopedics at the Hospital for Special Surgery.  My daughter is my pride and joy.”

When not at work Leona loves interior decorating, fashion designing, traveling, entertaining and church activities.

According to Leona, the most rewarding part of her job is, “Motivating others to flourish” and the most challenging part of her job is “bringing people at all levels of the organization together to form an effective and mutually reinforcing group for the benefit of each other and our patients.”  Overall, she says her experience working at Flushing Hospital is invaluable because she loves her job.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Lazy Eye

Amblyopia or Lazy Eye as it’s commonly called is an eye condition that usually develops in children. 

Lazy eye is most commonly caused by an imbalance in the muscles that position the eyes.  The imbalance can cause the eyes to turn into the or away from the nose.  This action prevents the eyes from working together and may be the reason for a difference in vision.

According to the Mayo Clinic, some signs and symptoms of lazy eye are: 

  • An eye that wanders inward or outward
  • Eyes that appear to not work together
  • Poor depth perception
  • Squinting or shutting an eye
  • Head tilting
  • Abnormal results of vision screening tests

The Mayo Clinic also states that, “It’s important to start treatment for lazy eye as soon as possible in childhood, when the complicated connections between the eye and the brain are forming. The best results occur when treatment starts before age 7, although half of children between the ages of 7 and 17 respond to treatment”

To diagnose lazy eye, a standard eye exam such as a 20/20 eye chart screening is not a satisfactory. Diagnosis often times is made in younger children by using eye drops to dilate their eyes, using a lighted magnifying device to detect cataracts and assess their ability to stare at a moving object and follow it.  In older children, tests using symbols or letters can access their vision.

Treatment options depend on the cause of lazy eye and on how much the condition is affecting your child’s vision. Your doctor might recommend:

  • Corrective eyewear Glasses or contact lenses can correct problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism that result in lazy eye.
  • Eye patches -To stimulate and strengthen the weaker eye.
  • Bangerter filter -This special filter that is placed on the eyeglass lens of the stronger eye. Similar to the eye patch, the filter works to stimulate and strengthen the weaker eye.
  • Eye drops – A prescription eye drop the temporarily blurs vision in the stronger eye.  This encourages the use of the weaker eye and offers an alternative to the patch.
  • Surgery – If the lazy eyes continue to cross or wander apart with the appropriate glasses, your doctor might recommend surgical repair to straighten the eyes, in addition to other lazy eye treatments.

Activities such as drawing, doing puzzles or computer games can also show positive results, however the effectiveness has not been proven.

The proper treatments for lazy eye, usually improves vision within weeks to months. Treatment can last from six months to two years.

It is recommended that the condition be monitored for recurrence of lazy eye. If lazy eye recurs, treatment will need to start again.

If you would like to have your eyes, or the eyes of a loved one, examined, please call the Ambulatory Care Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foods You Should Not Eat With Braces

Braces are effective in correcting orthodontic problems such as under bites or wide gaps. However, to receive these benefits you have to make certain sacrifices to protect your braces.

It is important that you avoid several foods that can damage components such as wires or get stuck in braces and increase your risk of tooth decay.
Some foods you should avoid while wearing braces are:

Some foods you may want to avoid while wearing braces are:

  • Popcorn
  • Nuts 
  • Hard taco shells
  • Sticky and hard candy 
  • Gum 
  • Ice
  • Corn chips 
  • Pretzels 
  • Hard cookies or crackers
  • Sticky or hard chocolate 
  • Raw vegetables 
  • Croutons 
  • French/Italian bread
  • Hard fruit 
  • Hard rolls 
  • Thin crust pizza
  • Meat 
  • Burgers 
  • Corn on the cob

When in a situation where one or more of these foods may be your only food choice, it is suggested that you cut the item into small pieces that will fit directly into your mouth so that you won’t have to use your front teeth for tearing.

Some “braces friendly” food options are: 

  • Hull-less popcorn 
  • Yogurt 
  • Bananas, grapes, oranges, strawberries, and other fruits without pits
  • Light crackers or cookies
  • Cheese 
  • Mashed potatoes, pasta, noodles
  • Peanut butter and jelly

Good nutrition while wearing braces is extremely important to having a healthy smile.  Eating right will help your teeth remain strong enough to support your braces and avoid any impediments that could cause your braces to be removed before the designated time. 

If you would like to have your teeth evaluated for braces or would like a dental check up, please contact the Department of Dental Services at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5521 to schedule and appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Krizia Bodden

October’s Employee Spotlight shines on Krizia Bodden, Coordinator for the daily operations of the mother/baby units which include Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM) as well as the OB/GYN Clinic at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Krizia has been an employee at FHMC for the past 12 years.  Before becoming a Coordinator, she worked as a Billing Clerk and a Registrar. 

Together with her husband and three sons, Krizia loves  shopping , going to movies and enjoying the great outdoors.  She is dedicated to her religious community and travels often.

As with anyone who works caring for patients, there are challenges. “Since I am a mom, it is extremely hard when a patient’s baby does not make it.  That will never get easier.”

The most rewarding part of her job is, “Patient satisfaction.  When I see the patients happy with the care given to them and their newborn child, the reward is great.”  Krizia credits her departments positive outcome to the staff she if proud to work with.

For these and so many other reasons, Krizia is our October Employee Spotlight.  Congratulations Krizia Bodden!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Fall Activities

autumn, fall, leaves, changingleaves, fallactivities

With temperatures dropping and crisp air abounding; the fall season is a great time to begin a fitness regime.

Some tips for how to start you fall fitness routine are:

Change it up – The fall season is a great season to spend time with family and friends while taking part in physical activities such as walking through apple and pumpkin patches, corn mazes or trails.

Participate in fun runs – The fall season is when organizations plan their fun runs.  You can participate in a 5K, or a turkey trot.  If you get a group together, it can further motivate you.

Appreciate fall foliage – The fall season brings with it lots of colored leaves.  Local parks usually have trails to walk, run or ride a bike on.

Go to a farmer’s market – Fall brings lots of root vegetables into season.  Take a bike ride and stop at local farmer’s markets to pick up some healthy, tasty fruits and veggies.

Rake the lawn – In the fall season, even chores can be a really good workout. Activities such as raking the leaves can provide great cardio exercise.

As you can see, fall offers several opportunities to stay active and create good habits that will last with you throughout the upcoming holiday season and winter months.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Dental Health Hygiene Month

October is National Dental Hygiene Month and Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) would like to bring awareness to a dental hygiene condition that affects most people, gum disease or gingivitis.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), approximately half of the American population has gum disease or symptoms of it. Affecting women and men alike, no one is excluded from this possible diagnosis- even child are susceptible.

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a contagious bacterial infection that affects the gum tissues and bone that supports the teeth.  Many factors can increase the chances of developing gum disease, such as tobacco use, stress, poor diet, or even genetics.  Hardened plaque, called tartar or calculus, that builds up by the gum line can bring about gingivitis and spread into the underlying bone.  It can start slowly without any pain and may go unnoticed until there is pain.

Some of the symptoms of gum disease can include:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums
  • Gums that bleed when brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Metallic taste
  • Chronic bad breath
  • Deep pockets (the space between gums and the teeth)

While practicing good dental hygiene, such as regular flossing and brushing after meals, can help slow the progression of such a disease, it is important to schedule regular dental check-ups to prevent gum disease or its progression.

Unfortunately, many people go to the dentist only when they experience some sort of pain or symptom. Don’t let this happen to you.  Keep on top of your oral health and make an appointment with your dentist every six months for a dental check- up and deep cleaning.  If you would like to make an appointment with a Board Certified Dentist at Flushing Hospital’s Dental Center, call 718-670-5221 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Diana Garcia

September’s Employee Spotlight shines on Diana Garcia, Newborn Nursery RN, AHN, CLC at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Diana is tasked with overseeing the Newborn Nursery Unit, performing newborn assessments and educating mothers and families on how to care for their newborns.

Diana joined the FHMC team in November of 2010.  She is a graduate of Long Island University Brooklyn and proud alum of St. Agnes Academic H.S.

When asked why she is so passionate about her work, Diana responded, “I was looking forward to breastfeeding my first child.  No one taught me how to breastfeed. I thought I was breastfeeding properly, but I wasn’t.” It was that lack of information which caused her son to become jaundiced and placed under phototherapy. This incident caused Diana to be discharged from the hospital before her infant.

That unsettling experience gave birth to why Diana Garcia is so committed to teaching mothers about the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding.

Throughout Diana’s day, she encounters a few challenges.  One of her “personal” challenges is getting mothers who relied on formula to try to breastfeed.  “So many mothers do not have the knowledge on how to breastfeed or the benefits that breastfeeding brings.” This was something Diana wanted to change and has dedicated her professional career to education and encouragement.

Although the breastfeeding journey begins in the hospital, Diana realizes that it is a challenge to maintain exclusivity in breastfeeding, especially when the mother is physically exhausted.  That is why she spends time reinforcing education and reminding the mothers of the benefits

In closing, Diana stated that she is “Honored to work at Flushing Hospital Medical Center because it is a Baby Friendly Hospital.”

For these and so many other reasons, we congratulate Diana Garcia for being September’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fatty Liver Disease

Liver conditions are usually attributed to the excessive consumption of alcohol, viruses or morbid obesity.  However, there is a condition that affects the liver that is caused by none of the aforementioned risk factors.  It is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

NAFLD is diagnosed when the patient has too much fat stored in their liver cells.  Typically, NAFLD causes no noticeable signs or symptoms other than, in some cases, fatigue, pain or tenderness in the upper right portion of the abdomen.

People at risk for NAFLD include those with:

  • High cholesterol
  • High levels of triglycerides in the blood
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity when it is concentrated in the abdomen
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Sleep apnea
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)
  • Hypopituitarism (underactive pituitary gland)

If you have NAFLD, you are at greater risk of developing a more serious condition called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

NASH is a more aggressive form of fatty liver disease that may progress into cirrhosis (scaring of the liver) and ultimately liver failure.

The signs and symptoms of NASH are:

  • Abdominal swelling
  • Enlarged blood vessels beneath the skin’s surface
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Red palms
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)

Although experts do not know exactly what causes NFLD and NASH, for some  it is believed the combination of the health issues listed above may cause excess fat to become toxic to the cells in the liver.  The risk factors cause the liver to inflame and develop scar tissue or cirrhosis.  The treatment for this condition varies.

The best way to reduce your risk of NAFLD is to implement a healthy plant based diet that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats, maintain a healthy weight and, after conferring with your physician, choose an exercise plan that is right for you.

If you are experiencing the signs and symptoms of NAFLD or NASH and the symptoms persist, it is important you seek the advice of a doctor.  If you would like to make an appointment at the Flushing Hospital Medical Center Ambulatory Care Center, call CTA

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pulmonary Fibrosis

pulmonaryfibrosis, lungdisease, shortnessofbreath, breathing

According to the Mayo Clinic, pulmonary fibrosis is a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes thickened, damaged and scarred. This thickened, stiff tissue makes it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As pulmonary fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath.

 

 

Some symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis are:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Dry cough
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Aching muscles and joints
  • Widening and rounding of the tips of the fingers or toes

Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by certain medical conditions, radiation therapy impurities and contaminants such as:

  • Silica dust
  • Asbestos fibers
  • Hard metal dusts
  • Coal dust
  • Grain dust
  • Bird and animal droppings

Unfortunately, pulmonary fibrosis cannot be cured.  There are medications that can help ease symptoms.  In severe cases, a lung transplant may be suggested.

 

If you have the symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis and would like to schedule an appointment with a Pulmonologist at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5639

For this and additional information regarding pulmonary fibrosis visit – https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pulmonary-fibrosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20353690

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.