Employee Spotlight – Krizia Bodden

October’s Employee Spotlight shines on Krizia Bodden, Coordinator for the daily operations of the mother/baby units which include Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM) as well as the OB/GYN Clinic at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).

Krizia has been an employee at FHMC for the past 12 years.  Before becoming a Coordinator, she worked as a Billing Clerk and a Registrar. 

Together with her husband and three sons, Krizia loves  shopping , going to movies and enjoying the great outdoors.  She is dedicated to her religious community and travels often.

As with anyone who works caring for patients, there are challenges. “Since I am a mom, it is extremely hard when a patient’s baby does not make it.  That will never get easier.”

The most rewarding part of her job is, “Patient satisfaction.  When I see the patients happy with the care given to them and their newborn child, the reward is great.”  Krizia credits her departments positive outcome to the staff she if proud to work with.

For these and so many other reasons, Krizia is our October Employee Spotlight.  Congratulations Krizia Bodden!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Vaccinations For Older Adults

Vaccinations for Seniors

Most people understand the importance of getting their children vaccinated. A great deal of attention has been paid to protecting them from dangerous conditions that could affect their undeveloped immune systems. Although much attention has been paid to the youngest portion of our population, there is another at-risk group that needs to be aware of vaccines that can help keep them healthy – our senior citizens.

There are many vaccines recommended for older adults but unfortunately, many seniors do not receive them.  Failure to do so can lead to serious consequences because as we age our immune systems weaken and the likelihood of developing serious complications increases greatly.

There are four suggested vaccines that all adults over the age of 65 should receive. They are:

  • Influenza vaccine – It is estimated that approximately 30 percent of seniors do not receive their annual flu shot. This is alarming because according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 85 percent of all seasonal flu-related deaths are among people 65 and older. Getting a flu shot every year can drastically decrease the chances of getting the flu and the complications that accompany it.
  • Pneumococcal vaccine – Older adults are much more likely to develop complications from the pneumococcal bacteria, such as blood infections, meningitis and pneumonia itself. Pneumococcal disease is responsible for the deaths of about 18,000 individuals over the age of65 each year. To protect against pneumonia it is recommended that all adults over 65 receive a series of two vaccines administered one year apart.
  • Tdap booster – This vaccine provides protection against three conditions – tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. This is especially important for older adults who spend time around infants, such as grandchildren since pertussis, also known as the whopping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory infection that can be life-threatening to babies. Even if you received this vaccine as a child it’s important to get the booster as its effectiveness wanes over time.
  • Shingles vaccine – The infection herpes zoster develops when the chickenpox virus, which lies dormant in almost all adults who had chickenpox as a child, reactivates later in life.  When it returns it can cause a blistering painful rash. It is recommended that all adults over the age of 50 receive the shingles vaccine, even if they already had shingles. The latest and most effective shingles vaccine is given in two doses, six months apart.

All older adults should adhere to these vaccinations to protect not only themselves but their loved ones as well. If you are over 65, speak to your doctor to find out if you are up to date with all your recommended vaccines.  If you would like to make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse Of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Vedautie “Veda” Seepersad, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Veda:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:
I have been working at Flushing Hospital for fifteen years

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: 
 I work on the Telemetry/Stroke unit

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A: 
I wanted to become a nurse because nursing is a compassionate, interesting, caring and rewarding profession. As a nurse, I can use my professional skills to work with people anywhere in the world. My humble approach and positive attitude towards patients and families make a difference in their lives. Having been a patient, I know how it feels to be lying in a bed so I treat all my patients with love and respect and do my best to take care of their needs.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:
 The best part of my job is working with my peers and teaching my new nurses. I feel rewarded when patients and families are satisfied and appreciative of the nursing care provided. Recently I had a patient who coded and expired. I had the opportunity to be with the patient knowing there was no family present. I was able to hold her hands while she passed. When the family arrived they were so appreciative and praised me for an awesome job well done knowing her mother did not die alone.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Does a Low Level of Testosterone Signify ?

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced by the testicles. It affects sexual development, appearance, muscle strength, and sperm production. As men age, the level of testosterone circulating in the blood tends to decrease. The decrease is usually gradual after the age of 30.

Besides age, there are also medical conditions that can lead to low testosterone levels. Examples of these conditions are Klinefelter syndrome, Noonan syndrome, damage to the testicles, Infection, or obesity. Cancer treatments including radiation or chemotherapy can also cause this effect. Some medications such as antidepressants and narcotics can also lower testosterone levels.

A low level of testosterone can cause:
• Diminished sex drive
• Erectile dysfunction
• Low semen count
• Hair loss • Fatigue
• Decrease in muscle mass
• Changes in memory
• Depression

A diagnosis for low testosterone can be made after evaluating the results of a blood test.

Treatment for low testosterone can be accomplished with Testosterone Therapy which can be administered in various ways:
• Transdermal
• Injection
• Oral
• Intranasal
• Pellets under the skin

There can be side effects of testosterone therapy such as redness at site of injection or where the patch is located, abnormal raising of blood hemoglobin levels, enlarged breasts, an enlarged prostate, or an altered sperm count.

Speak to your physician if you think you might be experiencing decreased testosterone levels. You can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Does it Mean to Have an Enlarged Heart ?

An enlarged heart, also known by its medical terminology as cardiomegaly, enlarges because of damage to the heart muscle. The main cause of an enlarged heart is when the walls of the ventricles become thin and stretched beyond their normal size. This is known as dilated cardiomyopathy. It can also be due to a thickening of the ventricles. This is known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

There are several factors that can lead to an enlarged heart.  These include:

  • Pregnancy
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Fluid around the heart
  • Excessive iron in the body
  • Thyroid disorders
  • Kidney disease
  • HIV
  • Alcohol or cocaine use
  • Abnormal heart valve
  • Viral infection of the heart
  • Genetics
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Abnormal heart rhythm

If a person experiences shortness of breath, an abnormal heart rhythm or edema these could be signs of an enlarged heart and be a reason for your doctor to conduct further tests. The diagnosis of an enlarged heart can be made by x-ray, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, stress test, CT scan or an MRI.

Treatment  for an enlarged heart may include taking medications that are prescribed once the cause of the condition has been determined.  It is also possible that treatment may require heart valve surgery, coronary bypass surgery, and a heart transplant. 

Lifestyle changes can also help people who have enlarged hearts. It is important to quit smoking, maintain a healthy weight, limit salt intake, control diabetes, and get a moderate amount of exercise.

Having an enlarged heart isn’t something that a person would be able to diagnose on their own. Speak to your physician if you have reason to be concerned. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month and Flushing Hospital Medical Center is spreading awareness by sharing important facts about the disorder with our community.

Down syndrome, also called Trisomy 21, is the most common chromosomal condition in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately one in every 700 babies in the U.S.  is born with Down syndrome.  

Typically, at the time of conception, a fetus receives genetic information from both parents in the form of 46 chromosomes.  Down syndrome occurs when the fetus receives an extra copy of a chromosome; resulting in 47 chromosomes.  This extra chromosome affects the way a baby develops physically and mentally.   Some of the physical features and developmental problems associated with Down syndrome include:

  • Flattened face
  • Small head
  • Upward slanting eyelids
  • Unusually shaped or small ears
  • Protruding tongue
  • Short height
  • Language delay
  • Mild to moderate cognitive impairment

Every baby born with Down syndrome is different.  Each child will have physical or intellectual disabilities that are unique to their condition.  Parents of babies born with Down syndrome are advised to enroll their children into early- intervention services such as speech therapy or occupational therapy as soon as possible.  These services can help to encourage or accelerate the child’s development.

The most commonly known risk factor linked to Down syndrome is a mother’s age.  Women over the age of 35 have a significantly higher risk of having a child with this condition.  Those with an increased risk are encouraged to consult a genetic counselor to discuss screening options.

To speak with a doctor a Flushing Hospital about your risk of having a baby with Down syndrome, please call  718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Fall Activities

autumn, fall, leaves, changingleaves, fallactivities

With temperatures dropping and crisp air abounding; the fall season is a great time to begin a fitness regime.

Some tips for how to start you fall fitness routine are:

Change it up – The fall season is a great season to spend time with family and friends while taking part in physical activities such as walking through apple and pumpkin patches, corn mazes or trails.

Participate in fun runs – The fall season is when organizations plan their fun runs.  You can participate in a 5K, or a turkey trot.  If you get a group together, it can further motivate you.

Appreciate fall foliage – The fall season brings with it lots of colored leaves.  Local parks usually have trails to walk, run or ride a bike on.

Go to a farmer’s market – Fall brings lots of root vegetables into season.  Take a bike ride and stop at local farmer’s markets to pick up some healthy, tasty fruits and veggies.

Rake the lawn – In the fall season, even chores can be a really good workout. Activities such as raking the leaves can provide great cardio exercise.

As you can see, fall offers several opportunities to stay active and create good habits that will last with you throughout the upcoming holiday season and winter months.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Folliculitis

folliculitis Folliculitis is a common skin condition that occurs when our hair follicles become inflamed.   This inflammation is often caused by:

  • Bacteria
  • A fungus
  • Blockages from skin products
  • Hair removal (shaving, waxing, plucking)
  • Ingrown hairs
  • Friction ( tight clothing rubbing against areas of the skin where hair is present)

The most common symptom of folliculitis is an outbreak of tiny, white-headed or red bumps on the skin. Other symptoms may include:

  • Tender, painful skin
  • Itchy skin
  • A large, swollen mass
  • Pus-filled blisters

Folliculitis can affect anyone; however, the risk increases if you have acne or dermatitis, regularly wear tight clothing, are taking certain medications, are a person who shaves often or soaks in hot tubs that are poorly maintained.

Treatment of folliculitis may vary based on severity.  If symptoms are mild, it is recommended that you keep the area clean and apply a warm compress. If you are itchy, topical solutions such as oatmeal lotion or hydrocortisone cream might help.  In severe cases or instances where symptoms last more than a few days, it is strongly advised that you see a doctor.  Your doctor may prescribe antifungal shampoos, antibiotics or antifungal creams or pills to help control symptoms.  In the event that a large, pus-filled boil has formed your doctor may perform minor surgery to drain the pus and relieve the pain.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Dr. Chad P. Gehani Elected President of The American Dental Association

Photo Courtesy of Dr. Chad Gehani

Founded in 1859, the American Dental Association (ADA) is our nation’s oldest and largest dental association.  For more than 150 years the organization has been known nationally and internationally as the leading resource on all things related to oral health. Many of the oral care guidelines we are familiar with today were established by the American Dental Association and hundreds of dental care products that we use boast the ADA’s Seal of Acceptance as a symbol of quality assurance.

Recently chosen to lead this globally recognized and influential American institution is Queen’s own Dr. Chad P. Gehani, Chair of Endodontics at Flushing Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Gehani was elected as the 156th President of the American Dental Association in September.

Becoming President of the ADA once seemed like a dream that Dr. Gehani was uncertain would come true.  In an interview in ADA News, he recalled a conversation he had with his father many years ago, “I called my father and said, ‘I’m now an American citizen and now a member of the ADA.’ He was very proud and actually said to me, ‘I want to see you as president of that association.’ And of course, in my mind, that was not doable for me so I just laughed at him. That was not in my cards.”   His father’s unwavering faith in his son’s abilities provided the motivation needed to help Dr. Gehani realize this dream could become a reality.

As President, Dr. Gehani often describes his role as a servant-leader.   He will lead the close to 200,000 members of the ADA while advocating for patients’ rights to access quality oral healthcare- especially those living in communities that are underserved.   Dr. Gehani aims to improve patient outcomes and provide the guidance needed to help them make informed decisions about their treatment options.

In addition to his role as President of the ADA, Dr. Gehani continues to serve as a mentor to dental residents at Flushing Hospital where he has worked for over two decades.  As Chair of Endodontics, he focuses on offering high-quality dental services to patients and providing resources to benefit the community.   His devotion to bettering the communities he serves has earned him the Ellis Island Medal of Honor- presented to individuals who exemplify a life dedicated to community service.

“We are proud to have Dr. Gehani as Chair of Endodontics at Flushing Hospital and just as proud that he has been elected President of the American Dental Association.  Dr.  Gehani abides by a strict code of ethics which is reflected in the work that he does.  He is very community-oriented which is the culture promoted here at our hospital,” said Mr. Robert Levine, Executive Vice President and COO of Flushing Hospital.

Each year, Flushing Hospital collaborates with the American Dental Association to promote the Give Kids a Smile Program, providing a day of free preventative dental care to children in the community.   The hospital’s dental department also offers free dental screenings, oral cancer screenings, and oral health education in schools, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and several local organizations.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

October is SIDS Awareness Month

The month of October is designated as National Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Awareness Month. The purpose of this observation is to bring attention to this leading cause of death in children under the age of one.

SIDS is the unexplained death of a seemingly healthy baby that occurs during sleep. The cause is not completely known, however, it is thought to be related to a defect in the part of the brain that controls breathing.

Some of the risk factors for SIDS include:

  • A low birth weight
  • Having a recent respiratory infection
  • Having a brain defect that controls breathing
  • Gender ( boys are at higher risk than girls)
  • Living in an environment with second hand smoke
  • Having a family history of SIDS
  • Having a mother who smokes or drinks alcohol during pregnancy

How a baby sleeps can also be a factor. The risk of SIDS may increase if a baby sleeps in a bed with another person, if a baby sleeps on their stomach, or if a baby sleeps on a mattress that is too soft.

There are a few ways to prevent SIDS from occurring. These include having the baby sleep on its back, keeping the room where a baby sleeps from getting too hot, keeping the crib as empty as possible, and having the baby sleep in the same room as an adult if possible. It is also thought that breast feeding for the first six months may help to prevent SIDS.

If you are pregnant, it is important to receive good prenatal care. Speak to your doctor about classes that you can take to learn how to properly care for your infant. You can also call Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5000 and ask to speak to a maternity specialist.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.