#WellnessWednesday

Leonardo da Vinci, although best known as a painter, happend to be fascinated by science. Like any modern day scientist, he used observations, common-sense reasoning and research to find answers to satisfy the many questions he had regarding the health of the human body, mind and soul.

He cataloged his findings in his “Notebooks.”  We are sharing one of his thoughts here and wish you a great #wellnesswednesday

“Vitality and beauty are gifts of Nature for those who live according to its laws.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The One Where you Reconnect With Your Family

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Summer is here and the kids are out of school.  It is the perfect time to spend quality family time together.

Studies have shown that a family vacation is one of the most beneficial ways you can spend time with your children.  A family vacation creates moments that children value and will long remember. For the most part, it can be used as time spent away from electronic distractions and helps both parents and children relax and recharge without daily stressors.

When you travel with your children, you are offering them new experiences that will cause heightened social, physical, cognitive and sensory interaction.  Visiting museums, national parks, swimming together in an ocean or pool, hiking through the forest, campfire chats or long rides in the car can be effective when seeking to strengthen the family bond.

A family vacation is also a good way to get your child to open up.  It is a time when chores don’t exist and rules are relaxed causing them to feel more open to discussing what’s going on in their lives.

Children, who travel with their family, learn how to interact with people from different backgrounds and cultures. Experiencing new places, foods, traditions and meeting new people increases a child’s confidence and builds interpersonal skills.

Whether it’s a short overnighter or a long adventure, a family vacation is something to be shared and has been proven to enrich the overall development of your child.  They return from the holiday happier and with knowledge of a world and cultures outside of their own way of living.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn How to Properly Stored Your Insulin in the Summer

We would never waste our food or allow it to become spoiled by the heat, but what about medicines? Medicines should not be the exception, specifically insulin.

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Insulin is a protein which is dissolved in water and is required to manage blood sugar levels in diabetics. As with any protein, bacteria can grow in insulin, making it susceptible to become spoiled. Bacteria can also break down the proteins in insulin and makes it less effective. Keeping insulin cool can help prevent it from spoiling and maintain its effectiveness. The recommended temperature for storage, once opened, should be anywhere from 59-68 degrees Fahrenheit. For insulin not in use, store between 36-46 degrees Fahrenheit. For many diabetics, insulin is most comfortably administered at room temperature.

Some other storage tips include:
• Do not freeze or use thawed insulin. The freezing temperature will break down the proteins and will not work to lower blood sugar levels.
• Do not leave in sunlight. This can break down the proteins in insulin as well.
• Inspect insulin prior to each use. Ensure that there are no clumps, crystals or particles in the bottle or pen. Insulin should be clear.
• Write the ‘start use’ date on the insulin vial and discard after 28 days or if it’s been opened.
• Never use expired insulin.
• Be wary of any unusual smells. Insulin should never have an odor or bad smell.

Insulin is administered in many forms including injections, pens or cartridges. Each may have different recommended storage times based on their manufacturer. It is important to check with a pharmacist, package insert, or the manufacturers’ website to ensure proper storage temperature of insulin.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.