History of Contact Lenses

Contact lenses are so commonly worn today that people don’t give them a second thought. Did you know that the concept for contact lenses goes all the way back to Leonardo DaVinci who described them back in 1508. Many scientists experimented with different materials over the next few centuries with only a little success. It was in the late 1800’s that German scientists devised a  prototype of a contact lens made from a thin piece of glass that covered the entire eye. In the early 1900’s it became possible to make a mold of the entire eye and this helped to make lenses that fit better.  By the 1950’s plastics were being developed that could be made thinner and with a better fit for the eye and they were replacing glass as the material of choice for contact lenses.  In 1960 the company Bausch and Lomb developed a technique to cast hydrogel, a plastic material that could be molded and shaped when wet, which allowed for the production of lenses that were able to be mass produced and of extremely high quality. Today lenses are much more comfortable than the lenses made 20 years ago. They can be worn for long periods of time and they allow the eye to breathe which earlier versions couldn’t do.
If you would like to make an appointment with our ophthalmology department please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pool Safety

The weather is warming up and people will be looking for ways to keep cool. One way that has always been popular during the warm summer months is swimming in a pool. Every year there are countless accidents and also fatalities at or near swimming pools. Many of which  could have been avoided had precautions been taken.
Safety Tips to follow:
• Never leave children unattended near a pool
• Only swim when there is a lifeguard present
• Every pool should have proper drain covers
• Pools should have alarms and proper fencing
• Keep the pool clean
• There should be no diving allowed in pools that are shallow
• Never swim alone
• There should be no horseplay in or near a pool
• Do not swim under the influence of alcohol or drugs
• Do not swim in a thunderstorm
• It is a good idea to give children swimming lessons before the start of the summer
• Children who don’t know how to swim should be given flotation devices to wear
There are many organizations around the country that offer swimming lessons for children and adults of all ages. If you don’t know how to swim, look into getting some lessons before heading out to the pool. You will have a good time and you will also be a lot safer this summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Receives Patient Safety Award and Ranks in Top 10% in Nation for Patient Safety

If you are sick and need to go to the hospital, it is important to know that if admitted, your hospital is dedicated to safety, and has a proven track record of preventing further illness and injury to its patients.

Healthgrades, a trusted provider of information to millions of health care consumers across the United States, recently recognized the best-performing hospitals in the country and Flushing Hospital Medical Center received the Patient Safety Excellence Award, an accolade that recognizes hospitals that lead in the prevention of patient safety events.

This prestigious honor highlights the hospital’s performance in safeguarding patients from serious, potentially preventable complications during their hospital stay.   Flushing Hospital, part of the MediSys Health Network ranked in the top 10% in the nation for patient safety.

To determine which hospitals receive the Patient Safety Excellence Award, Healthgrades reviews the results of 14 key patient safety indicators submitted by hospitals to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Some of the safety measures surveyed include pressure ulcers, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and postoperative sepsis rates.

Flushing is one of two hospitals in Queens and one of only four in New York City to receive this honor. The hospital attributes their vastly improved safety rates to robust quality improvement policies and programs that were initiated over a decade ago and that are still being followed and improved upon every day.

According to MediSys Health Network President, Bruce J. Flanz, “Patient Safety is one of the top priorities at Flushing Hospital. We are proud to be in a position to provide our patients with a safe and trusted environment to receive high-quality care. I would like to thank the many members of our staff who are committed to this effort.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Fruit Juice Healthy For Kids?

Although many parents perceive fruit juices, including boxed juices as healthy, the reality is most are not. Typically, packaged juices often contain large amounts of added sugar and are of no comparison to 100% fresh juice or whole fruit which offers several nutritional benefits.

According to an article published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, when served with a well-balanced meal in children over the age of one, 100% fresh or reconstituted juice in moderation can be a healthy part of a child’s diet.  It is important that the amount of juice consumed is moderated as studies have found that drinking too much can result in obesity and compromise dental health.

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers the following recommendations to help parents with making better health decisions for their children and moderating their juice intake:

  • Juice should not be given to children under the age of one because it offers no nutritional benefit.
  • If juice is given, intake should be limited to, at most, 4 ounces daily for toddlers age 1-3. For children age 4-6, fruit juice should be restricted to 4 to 6 ounces daily; and for children ages 7-18, juice intake should be limited to 8 ounces or 1 cup of the recommended 2 to 2 ½ cups of fruit servings per day.
  • Toddlers should not be given juice from bottles or easily transportable “sippy cups” that allow them to consume juice easily throughout the day. The excessive exposure of the teeth to carbohydrates can lead to tooth decay, as well. Toddlers should not be given juice at bedtime.
  • Consumption of unpasteurized juice products should be strongly discouraged for children of all ages.
  • Children who take specific forms of medication should not be given grapefruit juice, which can interfere with the medication’s effectiveness. In addition, fruit juice is not appropriate in the treatment of dehydration or management of diarrhea.
  • Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruits and be educated about the benefits of the fruit as compared with juice, which lacks dietary fiber and may contribute to excessive weight gain.

The best options for children’s health are water and fresh fruit.  Fruit juice offers no nutritional advantages when compared to whole fruit.  Water is ideal for hydration and offers more benefits. To speak with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center about your child’s nutrition, please call 718-670-5406.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Today is National HIV Testing Day

June 27th is National HIV Testing Day. There are 1.1 million people living with HIV in the United States, and one in seven are unaware they have the virus.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center, along with other health organizations is working together to raise awareness about the importance of getting tested and early HIV diagnosis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends “that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care.”

We are encouraging people to know their status. There are now more ways than ever to get tested.

Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center’s offer HIV testing to the community. For a list of our center’s and contact information, please visit https://www.flushinghospital.org/node/8/ambulatory-care

If a patient tests positive we also provide HIV counseling and treatment. We offer integrated clinical care, social and educational services in a comfortable and caring environment.

To receive more information about National HIV Testing Day and to learn more about the virus, please visit, https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/awareness/testingday.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

10 Interesting Facts About The Human Heart

Ours hearts are essential to our survival. They are part of our circulatory system and they are responsible for pumping oxygen-rich blood throughout our body, but how much do we really know about our heart?

Here are 10 interesting facts about the human heart that you may not have known:

  • The average heart is the size of an adult fist.
  • Your heart will beat about 115,000 times each day.
  • The beating sound your heart makes is caused by the opening and closing of its valves.
  • Each day, your heart pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood.
  • If you were to stretch out your blood vessel system, it would extend over 60,000 miles.
  • The human heart weighs less than one pound, but a man’s heart is typically two ounces heavier than a woman’s.
  • A woman’s heart beats slightly faster than a man’s.
  • There is such a thing as a broken heart. Symptoms are similar to a heart attack but the cause is usually stress and not heart disease.
  • Laughing is good for your heart. It reduces stress and gives a boost to your immune system.

While these facts are meant to be light and fun, the most important thing to understand is how important it is to maintain proper heart health. By eating right and exercising, you can remain heart healthy.

To speak with a doctor at Flushing Hospital about your heart health, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You Living Your Best Life?

We are all in search of finding ways to live our best life.  Often times we base our happiness on when we will have enough money or when a great job comes along or when we find our perfect love match.

That statement begs the question, “Why wait?”  Sometimes happiness arrives without any fanfare and we just begin to feel better.   That single emotional change can, often times, bring change in the other areas of your life.

Here are a few tips to get you moving toward your goal:

  • Live a clutter free life at home and in the office.
  • Learn how to say “no” so that we have more time to say “yes.”
  • Create a realistic budget you can live within.
  • Realize the benefits of exercise.
  • Eat healthy.
  • Walk more.
  • Choose friends with a positive outlook.
  • Don’t take life too seriously.

Recognizing when it is your time to “make it happen” is the key to success.  It may be a bit bumpy in the beginning, but everything that is worthwhile is worth working towards.  Good Luck!

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Vacuum Assisted Closure Therapy?

One of the many wound care treatment options available at Flushing Hospital Medical Center is wound VAC (Vacuum Assisted Closure) therapy.  This form of therapy is effective in treating large or chronic wounds.

A VAC device is utilized during treatment and is composed of a gauze or foam dressing, an adhesive strip which seals the wound and the dressing, as well as a drainage tube that connects to a vacuum pump.

The VAC system works to heal wounds more quickly by decreasing air pressure on the affected area. It may also help to accelerate the healing process by:

  • Reducing swelling
  • Draining excess fluids
  • Increasing blood flow
  • Reducing bacteria
  • Helping to draw the edges of a wound together

In addition to promoting rapid wound healing, VAC therapy can offer other advantages such as decreased levels of discomfort and a reduced risk of infections.

If you suffer from chronic wounds that may be caused by conditions such as diabetes, speak to your health care provider about exploring this form of therapy as a treatment option.

The Wound Care Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center is a state-of-the-art outpatient unit that provides specialized, interdisciplinary wound care to patients who suffer from non-healing or chronic wounds.

Designed to bring technically advanced, surgically-oriented wound care to patients whose wounds are resistant to traditional forms of treatment, the center is staffed with plastic surgeons, general surgeons, podiatrists, vascular surgeons and nurses certified in wound care. It currently boasts a success rate which is above the national average, and has expanded to a six-bed unit to better accommodate its growing number of patients.

To schedule an appointment Flushing Hospital’s Wound Care Center or to obtain more information about services provided, please call 718-670-4542.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and Depression

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Diabetes does not directly cause depression but can contribute to it indirectly for a variety of reasons. Managing diabetes can be very stressful and it does require a modification of eating habits and, to some degree, a modification of lifestyle. Many people have difficulty keeping their blood sugar under control and this can also lead to frustration and potentially be a cause of depression.
Signs of depression include:
• Change in appetite
• Change in sleep pattern
• Loss of interest in doing things that were once enjoyable
• Trouble concentrating
• Lack of energy
• Feeling suicidal
If diabetes is not well controlled then variations in blood sugar level, high or low, can lead to symptoms that are similar to depression.
Similarly, depression can lead to the onset of diabetes. When people are depressed their eating habits tend to be affected and many people will over eat to the point of becoming obese. Some people who are depressed have no desire to be physically active, and many will also smoke. All of these are risk factors for diabetes.
There are ways to manage both diabetes and depression simultaneously. The most important factor is to speak with a physician who has experience and can help you to gain control of these illnesses. A patient who has been diagnosed with diabetes might also benefit from a program that focuses on behavior modification that will lead to a healthier lifestyle. There are medications that can be prescribed which will be helpful in managing these illnesses. Seeking the help of a psychotherapist will also be helpful in gaining confidence in the ability to manage both diseases.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital to discuss diabetes management please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The History of Hearing Aids

For hundreds of years devices have been used to help the hearing impaired. As early as the 1600s devices were made from sea shells, animal horns and then, in later years,  from brass and copper. These early hearing instruments that were wide at one end to gather the sound and narrow at the other end to direct sound  into the ear canal. They were described as ear trumpets because of the way they looked.
In the 1700s it was discovered that sound could be sensed as vibrations on bony surfaces of the skull so devices were placed behind the ear to help  transmit these sounds.
In the 1800s devices were created that resembled tubes into which a person spoke at one end and the other end was placed in the ear of the person who was listening.
In the early part of the 20th century devices were developed that began to use electricity. This helped tremendously with the development of hearing devices that could amplify sounds and direct them into people’s ears. Some of the technology used by Alexander Graham Bell for the telephone was also used for these hearing aids.  Sounds were amplified by using a carbon microphone and powered by batteries.
Over the years, batteries became smaller and transistors were developed that helped to miniaturize the devices,  which improved helped sound quality.
The digital era has improved hearing aids even further both in quality of the sound and the size of the device. Hearing aids are now being used that fit in the ear canal and aren’t easily visible, making people less hesitant to wear them.  While years ago hearing aids were used mainly by people who were hard of hearing, now they can be used for people who just need a little help to hear more clearly.
If you or someone you know is experiencing difficulty hearing, it is recommended that you speak with a physician who will make a referral to our audiology evaluation department.  Please call 718-670-5486

for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.