Fascinating Facts About Our Liver

The human liver is a very vital organ. It is so important that we cannot survive if it stops functioning for one single day. Unfortunately, it is also one of the least thought about organs. Given its importance, let’s take some time to learn more about the liver and give it the attention it deserves. Here are some fascinating facts about the liver:

  1. Largest glandular organ – Our liver is the largest glandular organ of the human body and the second largest organ besides our skin.
  2. Multifunctional – Our liver simultaneously performs over 200 important functions for the body. Some of these important functions include supplying glucose to the brain, combating infections, and storing nutrients.
  3. It contains fat – 10% of our liver is made up of fat. If the fat content in the liver goes above 10% it is considered a “fatty liver” and makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.
  4. It stocks iron – Our liver stores important vitamins and nutrients from the food we eat and stocks them up for when we need them later.
  5. Detoxifier – Our liver detoxifies the harmful things we take in like alcohol and drugs. Without the liver the body cannot process these items.
  6. Creator of blood – The liver creates the blood that circulates in our bodies. In fact, the liver starts producing blood before we are born. Without the liver there would be no blood and no life.
  7. It regenerates – Our liver has the amazing ability to regenerate itself, making liver transplant possible. When people donate half their liver, the remaining part of the liver regenerates the section that was removed.

As you can see, our livers are extremely important organs and serve many vital functions. In other words, our livers are no chop- liver.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You REALLY Allergic to Antibiotics?

If taken correctly and not used to inappropriately combat viruses, antibiotics can  be extremely effective in preventing the spread of infection.  While there is a great deal of information circulating about the misuse or overuse of antibiotics, there is relatively very little shared about the underuse of antibiotics due to suspected allergies.

Many Americans are under the impression that they are allergic to antibiotics, but according to a recent New York Times article, it is estimated that up to 90 percent of antibiotic allergy claims are not legitimate. So why do so many people believe they are allergic when they are not? Most often it is not the individual’s fault; they were either falsely told by their parents that they were allergic to antibiotics when they were a child or they do not understand what constitutes an allergic reaction.

In reality, many individuals experience some type of reaction after taking antibiotics, such as an upset stomach, headache or diarrhea. These bodily responses are considered side effects, and should not be classified as an allergic reaction. A true allergic reaction is when your body treats the medication entering your system as an invader and releases chemicals called histamines to attack it.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include the development of a rash, swelling of the face, or some difficulty breathing. For most mild reactions, medications such as antihistamines or corticosteroids can be taken to treat symptoms.

In rare case however, some experience a more severe allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis. Symptoms of an anaphylactic allergic reaction include:

  • Difficult or noisy breathing
  • Swelling of the tongue
  • Swelling or tightness in the throat
  • Wheezing or coughing
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Pale complexion

Signs of an anaphylactic allergic reaction usually present within an hour of taking an antibiotic. If this type of reaction occurs, medical attention is necessary and 911 should be called immediately.  Treatment for a severe allergic reaction often requires an epinephrine injection to alleviate the symptoms.

While many antibiotic allergy claims are false, there are some people who are truly allergic. For those who truly are allergic, the antibiotic that they are most frequently allergic to is penicillin, or other antibiotics that are closely associated with it. Those who suspect that they are allergic to penicillin can confirm it with a simple skin test.

With the rise of so many “super-bugs,” proper treatment of infections using the correct course of antibiotics has never been more important.  Limiting the number of medications you can receive because you think you are allergic can prove to be very dangerous or even fatal.

If you believe you are allergic to antibiotics, but are not certain, speak to your doctor. Together you can discuss the pros and cons and arrive at an appropriate course of treatment.

Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center has many qualified doctors who can advise you on the correct use of antibiotics. To make an appointment, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

BENEFITS OF COLLAGEN FOR MAINTAINING A HEALTHY GUT

When talking about collagen, most people would equate it with skin care, but younger looking skin is only where the benefits of collagen begin.  Collagen can also play an important role in building and maintaining healthy connective tissue throughout your digestive tract.

Maintaining a strong digestive tract and stomach lining is extremely important for the prevention of a condition known as “leaky gut.”  Leaky gut happens when there are damages in the barrier lining of your intestine.  This condition may allow food and waste particles to pass into the bloodstream, causing an inflammation.  Leaky gut can cause bloating, gas, stomach cramps, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), as well as sensitivity to foods that are wheat-based, high in sugar and contain gluten.

Foods that are known to trigger leaky gut are:

  • Wheat-based products
  • Gluten-containing grains
  • Processed meats
  • Baked goods
  • Snack foods
  • Junk food
  • Dairy products
  • Refined oils
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Sauces
  • Beverages

Some simple ways to add more collagen to your diet are:Collagen is beneficial to gut health because it contains large amounts of the amino acids glycine, glutamine and proline which can be beneficial to the intestinal tract as well as the stomach.

  • Bone broth – Bone broth is made by simmering bones to help extract the flavor and beneficial nutrients of the bones marrow.  It is not only an excellent source of collagen, but it is tastes good and is easy to add to your diet through soups and stews.
  • Powdered gelatin – Gelatin is the cooked form or collagen.  By utilizing powdered gelatin as a tea or by adding it to your soups, stews and broths, you can quickly bump up your collagen consumption.
  • Supplements with collagen peptides – Collagen peptides are an easy way to get this important amino acid.  Most brands are broken down so that they are easy to digest and absorb.

Although leaky gut is more prevalent in persons with chronic diseases such as, celiac’s disease and type 1 diabetes, main source of leaky gut remains a mystery. Therefore, its treatment may vary.  Most doctors recommend adding a healthier menu to your lifestyle. They suggest adding more vegetables, fruit, gluten-free grains, healthy fats, fish, lean meats, eggs and yogurt to your diet.

If you are showing signs and symptoms of leaky gut and they persist, please see your doctor for further discussion.  If you’d like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Centers, Ambulatory Care Center, call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Itchy Ears – What is the Cause and How do You Treat Them?

If you ever experienced a sudden itch inside your ear and asked an elder member of your family why, they may have told you it means that someone is talking about you.

With all due respect to those spreaders of old wives tales, there is probably a more credible medical reason why our ears itch on occasion. The hard part is figuring out which of the many possible conditions or habits is causing this reaction.

Identifying the culprit can lead to appropriate treatment. Here are some potential causes:

  • Psoriasis Pain or itching on the skin on or around your ear might be an indication of psoriasis, a relatively common skin condition. If this is the case, you might notice a buildup of rough, dry, red patches or scales in the external area of your ear that can itch or hurt. There are a variety of treatment options including topical medications or steroids.
  • Skin allergiesThe skin inside your ears can itch because of an allergic reaction to something that is applied in or near your ear. A new hair product may be the culprit and earrings that contain nickel have also been known to cause an allergic reaction. Be mindful whenever introducing anything new to your skin and stop using it if you believe it is the cause.
  • Food allergies – Similar to reactions from skin contact, some might have an allergic reaction to something they ate, causing their ears to itch. Certain fruits, vegetables, or tree nuts are the most common sources of food allergies. A doctor can test for the source of a food allergy, determine the severity and prescribe the appropriate medication.
  • Infections– Itchy ears can sometimes be a sign of an ear infection. Bacteria and viruses cause them, usually when you have a cold or the flu. One kind of infection, swimmer’s ear, can happen when water stays in your ear after you swim. To stop the itch, you’ll need to treat the infection, possibly with ear drops or antibiotics.
  • Improper cleaningPlacing cotton swabs into your ears can inflame your ear canal and leave you itching. Pins, paper clips, matchsticks, and your fingers can also scratch the skin inside your ears, making it easy for bacteria to enter and cause an infection. Excessive ear wax build-up can also cause your ears to itch. Your doctor can remove excessive wax using special instruments.

Regardless of the reason you are experiencing an itching sensation in your ear, it is important to be mindful of any changes in your diet or environment and share that information with your doctor so he or she can prescribe the correct course of treatment.

To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Stuttering

Stuttering, sometimes called stammering or dysfluency is a disruption in the normal patterns of speech. It can take many forms, such as:

Message on chalkboard

• Repeating a sound or a syllable, especially at the beginning of the word, such as “li- li- like.”
• Prolongation of a sound such as “ssssss”
• Complete stoppage of speech or the omission of a sound.
• Repeated interruption of speech with sounds such as “uh” or “um.”

Stuttering can begin at any age, but it’s most common among children who are learning to form words into sentences. Boys are more likely than girls to stutter.

Approximately one out of every 20 children will develop stuttering that lasts for more than six months, but this does not necessarily mean that stuttering is going to be a lifelong problem. Knowing what to look for and responding appropriately to your child’s stuttering will go a long way toward preventing it from becoming a more long-term or even permanent condition.

Why does stuttering begin? At one time many people thought that stuttering was the result of either physical or emotional trauma. While there are rare instances of stuttering following traumatic events, this is not the typical factor when determining why stuttering begins. Instead, experts point to other factors that contribute to stuttering:

• Family History – According to research, 60% of all stutterers have someone in the family who also stutters.
• Child Development. – Children who have other language and speech problems are more likely to stutter than children who don’t.
• Neurophysiology – Which part of the brain processes language can contribute in identifying why some children stutter
• Family Dynamics – Some children’s stuttering has been attributed to high family expectations and a fast-paced lifestyle.

Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about your child’s stuttering. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist known as a speech-language pathologist (SLP) who can evaluate your child and determine whether or not there is a risk of a long-term problem. In most cases, treatment primarily focuses on training and working with the parents to develop techniques to help the child cope with and get beyond his or her stuttering.

Parents of children who stutter can also help by creating a relaxing atmosphere at home that encourages speech, even if a stutter is present. Some tips include:

• Create opportunities for talking that are relaxed, fun, and enjoyable.
• When conversing with your child, try to create an environment with limiting distractions, such as the presence of television.
• Don’t be critical of your child’s speech or insist on precise or correct speech. Don’t correct his speech, or complete his sentences.
• Don’t put pressure on your child to verbally interact with others when stuttering becomes a problem.
• Listen attentively to what your child is saying, maintaining normal eye contact without displaying signs of impatience or frustration.
• Model a slow, relaxed way of speaking to help your child slow down his own speech.
• Don’t be afraid to talk with your child about stuttering and answer questions. Explain that disruptions in speech are common.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn the Facts About Addison’s Disease

Just above each of our kidneys lie our adrenal glands. These glands are part of our endocrine system and are responsible for producing the hormones Cortisol and Aldosterone which help us to convert food into energy, maintain our immune system, and regulate our potassium and blood pressure levels.

When the adrenal glands become damaged they can affect our ability to generate a sufficient amount of these hormones, which could lead to a rare auto-immune disorder called Addison’s disease. This condition affects one in 100,000 people and can occur in all age groups and  both sexes.

While damage to your adrenal glands is the cause of over 70% of the diagnosed cases of Addison’s disease, long lasting infections, such as tuberculosis, HIV, or fungal infections can also lead to its onset. Addison’s disease may also develop after cancer cells spread from other parts of the body to the adrenal glands.

Addison’s disease symptoms usually develop slowly, often over several months, and may include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Weight loss and decreased appetite
  • Darkening of your skin (hyperpigmentation)
  • Low blood pressure, even fainting
  • Salt craving
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • Nausea, diarrhea or vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Muscle or joint pains
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Body hair loss or sexual dysfunction in women

Because symptoms of Addison’s disease progress slowly, they may go unrecognized until a physically stressful event, such as another illness, surgery, or an accident, worsens symptoms quickly. When this happens, it’s called an Addisonian crisis. For one in four people with Addison’s disease, this is the first time they realize they are ill. An Addisonian crisis is considered a medical emergency because it can be fatal.

While damage to your adrenal glands is the cause of over 70% of the diagnosed cases of Addison’s disease, long lasting infections, such as tuberculosis, HIV, or fungal infections can also lead to its onset. Addison’s disease may also develop after cancer cells spread from other parts of the body to the adrenal glands.

While Addison’s disease can be life threatening if not treated, those with it can live normal lives if they comply with a treatment plan that includes strict medication management.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When Is The Best Time To Get The Flu Vaccine ?

Flu season can start in September and run until May. Even before the summer is over, pharmacies start advertising that the flu vaccine is available. While many people believe that the best time to get a flu vaccine is as soon as possible, getting it in October probably is the best option. Some research has shown that the effects of the vaccine start to wear off after six months so we want to make sure we are well protected when the height of the flu season is upon us.

Every year the flu vaccine is different, manufactured with the hope that it will be effective against the prevalent strain expected for that year. It is estimated that it takes approximately two weeks for the vaccine to become fully effective, so being covered early is important. Everyone who is going to be vaccinated wants to be prepared before the peak of the flu season which runs from December to late March. If you would to schedule an appointment for a flu vaccine in the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center please call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Aspirin Recommendations

Daily aspirin therapy is sometimes recommended for people who are at risk for heart attacks or diagnosed with certain heart diseases. While this form of therapy is effective, it may not be the right form of treatment for everyone.

Taking occasional doses of aspirin is typically safe; however, daily use can lead to serious side effects.  This is why it is highly advised that you speak with your doctor to determine if this approach is best for you. Serious side effects of aspirin can include:

  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • A stroke resulting from a burst blood vessel
  • Allergic reactions

Recommendations for daily aspirin use may vary from person-to-person. Your doctor may recommend this regimen if you have:

  • Coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis
  • Had a heart attack
  • Had a transient ischemic attack or stroke
  • Had bypass surgery or a stent placement procedure

Your doctor may not recommend daily aspirin therapy if you:

  • Have a bleeding or clotting disorder
  • Have bleeding stomach ulcers
  • Have an aspirin intolerance
  • Drink alcohol regularly
  • Are undergoing certain medical or dental procedures

If you are considering daily aspirin therapy, you must consult your physician before you begin.  You should inform your doctor about any health conditions or risks you may have that will increase the chances of complications.  Provide a list of medications that you are taking, as some may contribute to drug interactions and adverse effects.  Based on the current condition of your health, your doctor will advise you as to whether or not daily aspirin therapy is right for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Wants Patients to Know Their Rights

When you or someone you love is being treated at the hospital there are so many things to keep track of and it can all seem quite confusing and frustrating.  While your primary focus during this time is on your recovery, it is important to know that each and every hospital patient has a number of rights that they are entitled to.

These laws and regulations help ensure the quality and safety of your hospital care. They outline that patients have the right to participate in decisions about their care and to understand what they are being told about their treatment plan.

Patients are encouraged to ask their doctors, nurses and other healthcare professional as many questions as they need to in order to help them fully understand their situation every hospital stay is different.  This includes learning about why certain procedures are being ordered and why certain drugs ae being prescribed.

Other rights pertain to receiving proper written discharge information when leaving the hospital, while others protect patients with special needs including those who are hearing or vision impaired as well as those who don’t speak English as their primary language.

Flushing Hospital wants all of our patients to have a pleasant and well-informed hospital experience during their stay.  The next time you are in the hospital, feel free to ask a member of the staff to review the Patient Bill of Rights  with you, or go to the New York State Department of Health’s website to read your rights now.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Important is “Gut Health” to Your Overall Well Being?

Once thought to be a relatively simple bodily system, we are now learning more and more about our digestive system and the major impact it has on our overall health.

Links are now being made between our digestive health and our immune system, mental health, endocrine system, skin diseases and even certain cancers. As a result, doctors are now stressing their patients to practice good “gut health,” which involves taking certain measures to protect and maintain proper functioning of our digestive system.

There are many ways an unhealthy gut can reveal itself. Obvious symptoms such as an upset stomach, gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, or heartburn can all be signs of an unhealthy gut.

Poor gut health can affect the functioning of the autoimmune system, leading to the body attacking itself. It can also be the reason for the development of certain food intolerances due to poor quality of bacteria in the stomach. Unintentional weight changes, skin conditions such as eczema, and sleep disturbances such as insomnia and fatigue can all also be linked to poor gut health.

There are several things that a person can do to improve their overall gut health, including:

  • Lower Stress Levels – Some ways to do this involve practicing meditation or yoga, taking a relaxing walk, or receiving a massage.
  • Get Enough Sleep – Try to prioritize getting at least 7–8 hours of uninterrupted sleep per night.
  • Eat Slowly – Chewing your food thoroughly and eating more slowly can help promote full digestion and absorption of nutrients
  • Stay Hydrated – Drinking plenty of water has been shown to have a beneficial effect on the lining of the intestines, as well as on the balance of good bacteria in the gut
  • Take a prebiotic or probiotic – Prebiotics provide “food” meant to promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut, while probiotics are live, good bacteria
  • Check for Food Intolerances – . By eliminating certain common food triggers you may be able to identify a food or foods that are contributing to your symptoms.

By concentrating on your gut health, you will not only improve the functioning of your digestive system, but you can also experience many other benefits to your overall health.

If you are experiencing problems that might be due to poor gut health, please speak to your physician. To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718- 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.