Aspirin Recommendations

Daily aspirin therapy is sometimes recommended for people who are at risk for heart attacks or diagnosed with certain heart diseases. While this form of therapy is effective, it may not be the right form of treatment for everyone.

Taking occasional doses of aspirin is typically safe; however, daily use can lead to serious side effects.  This is why it is highly advised that you speak with your doctor to determine if this approach is best for you. Serious side effects of aspirin can include:

  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • A stroke resulting from a burst blood vessel
  • Allergic reactions

Recommendations for daily aspirin use may vary from person-to-person. Your doctor may recommend this regimen if you have:

  • Coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis
  • Had a heart attack
  • Had a transient ischemic attack or stroke
  • Had bypass surgery or a stent placement procedure

Your doctor may not recommend daily aspirin therapy if you:

  • Have a bleeding or clotting disorder
  • Have bleeding stomach ulcers
  • Have an aspirin intolerance
  • Drink alcohol regularly
  • Are undergoing certain medical or dental procedures

If you are considering daily aspirin therapy, you must consult your physician before you begin.  You should inform your doctor about any health conditions or risks you may have that will increase the chances of complications.  Provide a list of medications that you are taking, as some may contribute to drug interactions and adverse effects.  Based on the current condition of your health, your doctor will advise you as to whether or not daily aspirin therapy is right for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Wants Patients to Know Their Rights

When you or someone you love is being treated at the hospital there are so many things to keep track of and it can all seem quite confusing and frustrating.  While your primary focus during this time is on your recovery, it is important to know that each and every hospital patient has a number of rights that they are entitled to.

These laws and regulations help ensure the quality and safety of your hospital care. They outline that patients have the right to participate in decisions about their care and to understand what they are being told about their treatment plan.

Patients are encouraged to ask their doctors, nurses and other healthcare professional as many questions as they need to in order to help them fully understand their situation every hospital stay is different.  This includes learning about why certain procedures are being ordered and why certain drugs ae being prescribed.

Other rights pertain to receiving proper written discharge information when leaving the hospital, while others protect patients with special needs including those who are hearing or vision impaired as well as those who don’t speak English as their primary language.

Flushing Hospital wants all of our patients to have a pleasant and well-informed hospital experience during their stay.  The next time you are in the hospital, feel free to ask a member of the staff to review the Patient Bill of Rights  with you, or go to the New York State Department of Health’s website to read your rights now.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Important is “Gut Health” to Your Overall Well Being?

Once thought to be a relatively simple bodily system, we are now learning more and more about our digestive system and the major impact it has on our overall health.

Links are now being made between our digestive health and our immune system, mental health, endocrine system, skin diseases and even certain cancers. As a result, doctors are now stressing their patients to practice good “gut health,” which involves taking certain measures to protect and maintain proper functioning of our digestive system.

There are many ways an unhealthy gut can reveal itself. Obvious symptoms such as an upset stomach, gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, or heartburn can all be signs of an unhealthy gut.

Poor gut health can affect the functioning of the autoimmune system, leading to the body attacking itself. It can also be the reason for the development of certain food intolerances due to poor quality of bacteria in the stomach. Unintentional weight changes, skin conditions such as eczema, and sleep disturbances such as insomnia and fatigue can all also be linked to poor gut health.

There are several things that a person can do to improve their overall gut health, including:

  • Lower Stress Levels – Some ways to do this involve practicing meditation or yoga, taking a relaxing walk, or receiving a massage.
  • Get Enough Sleep – Try to prioritize getting at least 7–8 hours of uninterrupted sleep per night.
  • Eat Slowly – Chewing your food thoroughly and eating more slowly can help promote full digestion and absorption of nutrients
  • Stay Hydrated – Drinking plenty of water has been shown to have a beneficial effect on the lining of the intestines, as well as on the balance of good bacteria in the gut
  • Take a prebiotic or probiotic – Prebiotics provide “food” meant to promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut, while probiotics are live, good bacteria
  • Check for Food Intolerances – . By eliminating certain common food triggers you may be able to identify a food or foods that are contributing to your symptoms.

By concentrating on your gut health, you will not only improve the functioning of your digestive system, but you can also experience many other benefits to your overall health.

If you are experiencing problems that might be due to poor gut health, please speak to your physician. To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718- 670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mononucleosis – the “Kissing Disease”

Mononucleosis is a condition caused by the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). It is called the  “Kissing Disease” because it is spread through the saliva from one person to another. It can also be spread when drinking from the same glass or bottle as someone who is infected.  The virus  can also be transmitted through sexual contact or through a blood transfusion.  Mononucleosis  can remain in the body long after the symptoms have disappeared. Some people have the disease without even being aware.

 

 

 

Symptoms of mononucleosis can include:

  • Feeling tired
  • Fever
  • Lack of appetite
  • Rash
  • Sore throat
  • Weakness

The spread of mononucleosis can be prevented by staying away from people who are infected and by not sharing drinking glasses, silverware, toothbrushes, and not having sexual relations with them.

There is no medication to treat mononucleosis. It usually clears up by itself over time. The symptoms can be relieved by getting plenty of rest, staying hydrated, taking pain medication, and gargling with warm salt water It is important to avoid strenuous activities while the symptoms are present and ease slowly back to your normal routine once you start to feel better.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefits of Essential Oil Diffusers

It’s no secret that natural living can be beneficial to your health.  If you are already living more naturally, you probably know the advantages of using an essential oil diffuser, but if you are just beginning to use essential oils, here are some of their many benefits.

An essential oil diffuser is also known as an aromatherapy diffuser.  It disperses essential oils into the air and fills the area with a natural fragrance.

One of the best known uses for essential oils is their ability to assist you in unwinding after a tough day.  Oils such as chamomile, lavender and clary sage in a diffuser can give you a much needed break from the stress of the day and help you sleep.

Many other essential oils, such as peppermint, lemon, eucalyptus, tea tree, sage, rosemary, grapefruit, lemon and thyme are anti-microbial and when introduced into the air in vapor form, can be a great way to keep a cold or flu away.

These essential oils can also be used to boost your immune system and diffusers double as humidifiers to help keep your airways moist causing you to breathe easier and be less susceptible to germs.

There are even claims that diffused oils such as ginger, chamomile, lavender, eucalyptus, clary sage, rosemary, pine and bergamot can be helpful in soothing headaches, sore joints and overworked muscles, as well as being a way to super-charge your brain cells.

These are only some of the many benefits of using an essential oil diffuser.  To any one of you individually, the benefits may vary, but since we always put safety first, using essential oil diffusers is a safer option than lit candles or burning incense.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Graves’ Disease

The thyroid gland is found in the neck and produces hormones that control many of the body’s functions including heart rate and metabolism.                                  Hyperthyroidism is the condition where the thyroid gland over produces these hormones causing the body to function improperly.                                                                  Grave’s Disease is one of the conditions that is characterized by an excess production of thyroid hormones. It is caused by an autoimmune disease, which means that the body is producing antibodies that attack the cells in the thyroid gland and cause it to malfunction.  It more commonly affects women, and usually starts before the age of 40. Some of the factors that can cause Graves’ disease are genetics, a family history of the disease, having other autoimmune diseases, stress, and smoking.
The diagnosis of Graves’s disease is made by physical examination and also lab tests that measure the production of thyroid hormones in the blood.
Symptoms of Graves’  disease include:
• Anxiety
• Weight loss
• Irritability
• Increased perspiration
• Slight tremor
• Difficulty sleeping
• Bulging eyes
• Frequent bowel movements
• Rapid or irregular heart beat
Treatment for Graves’ disease is very important. Depending on the severity, it may be necessary to destroy the thyroid gland using radioactive iodine or completely removing it by surgery.  If the thyroid gland is no longer functional or present, supplemental hormones will have to be taken daily that mimic its function in order to keep the body regulated properly. If treated properly, the disease can be managed successfully.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital and NYSS Offer Patients a New, Groundbreaking Weight Loss Treatment

Flushing Hospital Medical Center and the New York Surgical Specialists (NYSS) physician group is proud to announce that we offer a safe and effective, non-surgical alternative for individuals who struggle with obesity and have unsuccessfully tried to lose weight through conventional diet and exercise.

Weight loss specialists, Sanjeev Rajpal MD, Darshak Shah MD and Noman Khan MD are all excited that Flushing is one of the only hospitals in the area to offer our patients the revolutionary, Obalon weight loss system. Obalon is the first and only non-surgical, and completely non-invasive weight loss treatment option approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Patients who participate in the Obalon treatment swallow a small, coated capsule connected to a thin tube. Once the capsule is digested, it naturally dissolves and a small, lightweight gastric balloon unfolds. This balloon is then filled with medical gases via the tube before it is removed. This process is repeated two more times over a six month period. Each procedure only takes 10 minutes, requires no sedation and can be performed in our New York Surgical Specialists office.

Once expanded, each to the size of a small orange, the three balloons work to facilitate weight loss by taking up space within the stomach, enabling patients to become fuller while eating less.

After six months the balloons are removed endoscopically while the patient is under light, conscious sedation.

Throughout the entire three-stage, six month process, patients will receive nutritional and exercise support from our weight loss team.

The Obalon Weight Loss System offers many benefits to those patients, who do not qualify for, or are seeking an alternative to bariatric surgery, including:

  • Obalon is clinically proven to be twice as effective as diet and exercise alone
  • There are minimal risks or side effects
  • No sedation is required and the entire procedure only takes 10 minutes
  • Obalon is affordable as compared to other surgical weight loss options, but it is not currently covered by most insurance providers
  • Patients can resume their normal daily lifestyle immediately
  • The procedure is completely reversible

Not everyone is a candidate for the Obalon weight loss system. To qualify, patients must be:

  • At least 22 years old
  • Have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30-40
  • Have not had any form of weight loss surgery
  • Are actively attempting to lose weight through diet and exercise
  • Are committed to maintaining a healthy lifestyle during and after treatment

To learn more information about the Obalon weight loss system, or to make an appointment with one of our highly qualified physicians, please call Flushing Hospital at 718-670-8908 or our New York Surgical Specialists offices at 718-408-6977.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Hand Sanitizer Prevent the Flu?

During the flu season and throughout the year, protecting against bacteria is a battle fought nationally. There may be varying medical opinions, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is clear on their opinion

According to the CDC, if soap and water is not available, it is recommended that you use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

The CDC cautions that when using a hand sanitizer, you should make sure that all organics (i.e. dirt, food) should be removed from hands prior to applying the hand sanitizer.

After removing the surface substance, it is recommended that you apply a dime sized amount of waterless hand sanitizer to the palm of your hand, rub your hands together making sure to cover all surfaces of the hands and fingers and rub until the hand sanitizer is absorbed.

Some benefits of using a waterless hand sanitizer are:

  • Requires less time than hand washing with soap and water
  • Dries quickly on hands
  • Is more accessible than sinks
  • Reduces the bacterial count on hands
  • Can be less irritating to skin than soap and water

Although medical professionals may have different opinions on how to most effectively protect against bacteria, they all agree that hand washing with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of germs in most instances.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Chronic Kidney Disease

Approximately 30 million adults in the United States are living with chronic kidney disease (CKD).  This condition causes damages to kidneys and leads to a loss of function over time.  If your kidneys are unable to function properly, complications such as hypertension, nerve damage, weakened bones and anemia can develop. CKD also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

While high blood pressure can result from chronic kidney disease, it can also be the cause of it.  Other conditions and diseases that can cause CKD include diabetes, recurrent kidney infections, prolonged obstruction of the urinary tract and vesicoureteral reflux.

Anyone at any age can develop chronic kidney disease; however, some people are more at risk than others. You may have an increased risk for CKD if you:

  • Have a family history of kidney  failure
  • Have diabetes
  • Have hypertension
  • Are obese
  • Have cardiovascular disease
  • Are a smoker
  • Are of African American, Native American, Pacific Islander or Asian American descent
  • Are an older adult

Signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease can vary by individual and may appear over time as the disease progresses. They can include:

  • Muscle cramps and twitches
  • Swelling of feet and ankles
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Fatigue
  • Frequent urination, especially at night
  • Itchy skin
  • Shortness of breath
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • High blood pressure
  • Vomiting

There are several things you can do to prevent CKD and keep your kidneys healthy.  Maintaining a healthy diet and cutting back on food rich in sugar and salt is beneficial for your kidneys, as well as monitoring cholesterol levels, keeping hydrated, quitting smoking and drinking in moderation.

If you are living with chronic kidney disease, it is strongly advised that you keep blood pressure and blood sugar levels under control, moderate protein consumption, reduce salt intake, avoid NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and get the flu shot each year.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Hernia Center Offers Expert Care to Those in Need

Flushing Hospital Medical Center now offers a comprehensive center to diagnose and treat a variety of forms of hernias.

A hernia occurs when an organ or fatty tissue pushes through a weak spot or an opening in the muscle or tissue that is supposed to hold it in place.  There are many different types of hernias, including inguinal, hiatal, umbilical, and incisional.

 

  • An inguinal hernia occurs when the intestines push through the lower abdominal wall, often in the inguinal canal located in the groin. . This is the most common type of hernia and it is more common in man than women.
  • A hiatal hernia develops when part of the stomach protrudes up through the diaphragm into the chest cavity. This type of hernia almost always results in gastroesophageal reflux. Hiatal hernias are most common in adults 50 years or older.
  • Umbilical hernias present in children and babies under six months old. They occur when the child’s intestines bulge through their abdominal wall, near the belly button.  An umbilical hernia is the only type that can go away on its own as the babies muscles get stronger.
  • An incisional hernia can take place after abdominal surgery. During this time, the tissues and muscles are typically weak and the intestines may push through an incision scar.

Hernias can develop quickly or slowly build over a long period of time. There are many factors that can contribute to the onset of a hernia. One of the most common reasons is straining a muscle while lifting heavy weight. Other factors include: being pregnant, being constipated, sudden weight gain, or persistent coughing or sneezing.

The most common symptom of a hernia is a bulge in the affected area. They are most identifiable through touch, especially when standing up, bending over, coughing, or crying (in babies). Other symptoms include pain in the affected area, weakness, or a burning sensation. Hiatal hernias will often result in acid reflux, chest pain, and possibly difficulty swallowing.

Your doctor can diagnose a hernia through a physical examination. Sometimes an x-ray or endoscopy is necessary. Treatment options for your hernia depend on the size and severity and can include lifestyle changes, medication or surgery.

Lifestyle changes can include altering your diet, exercising to increase muscle strength, avoiding lifting heavy objects and maintaining good posture.  Medications may be helpful in the treatment of a hiatal hernia. In most cases however, surgery may be required.

Hernia procedures can be done using open or laparoscopic techniques and Flushing Hospital’s new Hernia Center offers a wide variety of options for both methods. Our expert staff has a great deal of experience in this field with excellent outcomes. Many of the procedures can be performed with minimally invasive techniques, including the utilization of our da Vinci Robotic Surgery System.

For more information about Flushing Hospital’s Hernia Center, please call 718-670-3135.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.