How Your Pharmacist Can Help You

Your pharmacist is a healthcare professional trained to accurately dispense prescribed medications and apply safety measures to ensure their proper use.

In addition to dispensing prescriptions, pharmacists can provide you with information on prescribed and over-the-counter drug interactions.  They can also offer tips to improve medication adherence. This is especially helpful if you find it difficult to take your medicine when you are scheduled to.

Not only are pharmacists well-informed about medications; they are a great source of information on durable medical equipment and home health care supplies as well.

Pharmacists are trained to educate patients about general health topics such as disease prevention, exercise, diet, smoking cessation and managing stress.   They are licensed to provide immunizations in all 50 states and play an integral role in helping to minimize the transmission of community-acquired diseases and viruses such as the flu.

If you are unsure of how to dispose of your medications, your pharmacist can advise you on how to properly and safely dispose of unused drugs.

Get to know your pharmacists; they are an essential part of your healthcare team.  By working together you can personalize your service and improve the quality of care you receive.

For your convenience, a full-service pharmacy is located on site in the Medical Science Building at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.  Our warm and friendly staff provides prescription services to discharged, emergency department and clinic patients as well as employees. For more information, please call 718-353-3160 or visit http://flushinghospital.org/patient-services/flushing-hospitals-retail-pharmacy

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Can Your Pharmacist Help You Manage Your Care?

Managing your health requires a team approach. Many different healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, and various specialized technicians all participate in your care, but one member of that team who plays a significant role in your treatment is often overlooked and underutilized; your pharmacist.

Many people view their local pharmacist as only a person who dispenses their medications, but your pharmacist is an active member of your healthcare team.  They are a valuable resource to answer questions about your medications and offer helpful tips. In addition, patients have many more interactions with their pharmacist than they do with their doctor each year, so why not take advantage of their expertise?

Here are a few ways your local pharmacist can help you:

  • Information on side effects – Information about potential side effects on medication labels can often be confusing and overwhelming. Your pharmacist can explain which side effects are most common and outline who is most at risk for developing them.
  • Scheduling your medications – Your pharmacist can help you map out a schedule for when to take your medications. This can be especially helpful if you are taking multiple prescriptions. The effectiveness of certain medications can be minimized when taken simultaneously with others. Some medications can also work better if taken at certain times of day or with or without food.
  • Consequences for missing a dose – While skipping your regular dose of medication is not recommended, it is not always a cause for concern.  How to deal with this type of situation depends on the medication and why it is being taken. Your pharmacist can explain how to handle this problem if and when it occurs.
  • Storage Instructions – Properly storing your medications will greatly impact their effectiveness. Be sure to ask your pharmacist how to store them. Most medications should be kept at room temperature with low humidity. Some however, need to be refrigerated.

When choosing a pharmacist, make sure he or she will take the time to answer all your questions. If you do not have a pharmacist, Flushing Hospital has a retail pharmacy located in the lobby of the Medical Science building. Our staff will take the time to ensure that you have a full understanding of how to take your medications to ensure you properly manage your health. For more information about our pharmacy service, please call 718-353-3160.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why You Need To Take All Your Antibiotics

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Antibiotics are often prescribed to treat bacterial infections and several diseases. These medications can be efficient if used correctly. However, improper use can lead to reinfection or the development of a more serious issue.

By not taking the entire course of treatment recommended by your physician you run the risk of allowing bacteria to survive and developing a resistance to antibiotics. Depending on the severity of your condition, your physician may have to resort to more invasive or extensive measures of treatment such as surgery, stronger medications or hospitalization.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (www.fda.gov) recommend that consumers follow these recommendations for proper antibiotics use:

  • Complete the full course of the drug. It’s important to take all of the medication, even if you are feeling better. If treatment stops too soon, the drug may not kill all the bacteria. You may become sick again, and the remaining bacteria may become resistant to the antibiotic that you’ve taken.
  • Do not skip doses. Antibiotics are most effective when they are taken regularly.
  • Do not save antibiotics. You might think that you can save an antibiotic for the next time you get sick, but an antibiotic is meant for your particular infection at the time. Never take leftover medicine. Taking the wrong medicine can delay getting the appropriate treatment and may allow your condition to worsen.
  • Do not take antibiotics prescribed for someone else. These may not be appropriate for your illness, may delay correct treatment, and may allow your condition to worsen.
  • Talk with your health care professional. Ask questions, especially if you are uncertain about when an antibiotic is appropriate or how to take it.

If you have questions about taking your prescribed medications, do not hesitate in contacting your physician or pharmacy for instructions.

For your convenience, a full-service pharmacy is located in Flushing Hospital’s Medical Science Building providing prescription services to discharged, emergency department and clinic patients. The hours of operation are Monday through Friday 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM. 718-353-316

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.