Men’s Health – Learn About Testicular Cancer

April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month. This month-long observance spotlights the disease and emphasizes the importance of understanding the risks and warning signs of it.

Testicular Cancer is the most common cancer in men ages 15-34, with an estimated 10,000 cases diagnosed in the United States every year.  Testicular cancer, which can develop in one or both testicles, occurs when sexual reproductive cells called germ cells experience abnormal growth. If germ cells become cancerous, they multiply, forming a mass of cells called tumors that begin to invade normal tissue. If not treated, they can spread rapidly to other parts of the body including to the abdomen, liver, lungs, bones and brain.

Regular testing by your physician and conducting monthly self-examinations of the testes is important for early detection. Since testicular cancer is usually isolated to a single testicle, comparing your testicles with one another for abnormalities can be helpful. It is important to know that it is normal for one testicle to be slightly larger than the other so your focus during a self-exam should be on other differences between the testes as well as changes from the previous month. In addition to self-exams, all men should have their primary care physician check their testicles as part of their annual physical.

The warning signs of testicular cancer include:

  • A lump of any size on the testicle
  • Enlargement of the testicle, change in shape, size or any irregularities
  • Pain or discomfort in the scrotum or testicle
  • A dull ache or sense of pressure in the lower abdomen or back
  • A feeling of heaviness or fullness in the scrotum
  • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts due to elevated hormone levels

In most cases early stages of testicular cancer present themselves in a completely painless manner. If any of these symptoms are present, you need to see your doctor for further testing immediately.

By raising awareness during the month of April, we can empower individuals to learn more about testicular cancer and educate men about the importance of early detection.

To make an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Men’s Health Month

The month of June has been recognized as Men’s Health Month. The reason for this designation is to bring awareness of preventable health issues and to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases prevalent in men.
The leading causes of death among men are:
• Heart Disease
• Cancer
• Diabetes
• Lung Disease
• Injuries
• Stroke
• HIV/AIDS
Some of the reasons that men tend to have more serious chronic illnesses is because more men than women don’t have health insurance, men tend to have more physically demanding jobs with greater safety risks. Additionally  more men smoke than women and they also tend to  take greater risks with unsafe behavior.
Women tend to live five years longer than men and one of the reasons for this is that women usually take better care of their health. Men are often guilty of waiting until a disease has progressed to a more serious level before they seek help. There is an old adage that if a man is in a doctor’s waiting room, most likely a woman brought him there for an exam.
During the month of June, organizations across the country hold health awareness campaigns to educate men about various health issues that they may be at risk for and to encourage them to see a doctor regularly. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Top Men’s Health Issues

Men with xray screen showing their organs

It is no secret that men are less vigilant about receiving healthcare than women. In fact a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that men in the United States are 80% less likely than women to visit their doctor’s office regularly and schedule routine medical screenings.

There are several reasons given as to why men steer clear of the doctor’s office and delay treatment-some are, “there is probably nothing wrong” or “I’d rather tough it out.”  This laid-back approach to health care can unfortunately result in shorter or less healthy lives for men, if medical conditions go untreated. The good news is that many of the leading threats to men’s health are preventable and treatable if detected early. Here are few chronic health conditions that affect men the most:

 

  1. Cardiovascular disease also known as heart disease is one of the leading health risks facing men today. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), more than one in three adult men has heart disease. Although it may seem that something so serious should have warning signs, one may be developing heart disease without knowing it. Luckily, there are many lifestyle changes that can be made to ward off heart disease, such as not smoking, following a heart-smart diet, and being physically active.

 

  1. Lung cancer is one of the few cancers that can often be prevented simply by not smoking. Men who are at high risk for developing lung cancer may want to talk to a health care provider about quitting smoking- if they are smokers and getting yearly low-dose CT scans to test for early lung cancer.

 

  1. Prostate cancer is typically found in men over the age of 65. The chance of getting prostate cancer increases as a man gets older. For reasons that are still unknown, African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer than other races. Men with a family history of prostate cancer are at a high risk for developing the disease.

 

  1. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common type of diabetes found in men. It affects approximately 95% of the 13 million men with the disease in the United States. Type 2 diabetes affects the body’s ability to use insulin properly. This can elevate sugar levels and cause damage to the body over time.

 

The first step to staying healthy is educating yourself, and then taking the necessary precautions to reduce your risk. It is equally as important to develop a relationship with your healthcare provider.  Your doctor can create a health care plan to screen, diagnose and treat diseases that you may at be risk for developing.

To schedule an appointment with a primary care physician, please call the Ambulatory Care Center at Flushing Hospital at 718-670-5486.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.