Is Prenatal Yoga Right For You?

 

Keeping active while pregnant is good for you and for your baby.  Research suggests that practicing prenatal yoga offers many benefits, including helping you relax and prepare for labor.

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Many childbirth-preparation classes encourage stretching, mental centering and focused breathing. Taking prenatal yoga classes in a yoga studio or using an exercise DVD can:

.Improve sleep and balance

.Reduce stress and anxiety by calming the nervous system

.Increase strength, stamina, flexibility and endurance needed for childbirth

.Ease lower back pain, nausea, headaches and shortness of breath

.Decrease the risk of preterm labor, pregnancy-induced hypertension and intrauterine growth restriction

. Helps with breathwork in preparation for labor

. Increase circulation

Check with your doctor before starting any exercise program.  Listen to your body and do what feels right for you. Prenatal yoga can be a great way to prepare for childbirth. Namaste!

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Headphones Bad for Your Hearing?

download (3)Headphones are popular for a multitude of reasons, such as convenience and sound quality, but there is a downside to these devices. According to The Journal of the American Medical Association, the number of teens who have experienced hearing loss has increased by 33% since 1994.  Do you catch yourself blasting music while listening to your headphones for long periods of time? If so, your hearing may be at risk.

Headphones come in a variety of styles, but the two most commonly used are earbuds and around-ear headphones. While around-ear headphones can have negative side effects, earbuds are the more dangerous because they are inserted directly into your ears, providing an uninterrupted route for the music to travel through your ear and straight to your eardrum. When sound enters the ear, the eardrum vibrates. These vibrations travel to the cochlea, where fluid carries them to fine hairs that trigger the auditory nerve fibers, which travel to the brain. When a sound is too loud, the hairs can become damaged, causing permanent hearing loss.

Noise is damaging at about 85 decibels, or the volume of a hair dryer. People who tend to play music up to 110-120 decibels over a long period of time while using earbuds, which increases the sound by 7-9 decibels, can experience a significant amount of hearing loss.

Want to avoid further hearing loss? Try some of these helpful tips:
• Listen to your music for no longer than an hour and no louder than 60% of volume.
• Purchase around-ear headphones with noise-cancelling technology so you can avoid blasting music and prevent music from having direct contact with your eardrum.
• Remove earwax. Earwax builds up every time you push earbuds into your ear canal, so make sure you gently clean it out to prevent hearing loss, discomfort and infection.

If you’re experiencing hearing loss, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center to schedule an appointment with an ENT at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What are the Risk Factors and Symptoms of Childhood Asthma?

Did you know that asthma is the most common, chronic,childhood disease?  It’s more commonly found in children who live in urban areas and more prevalent in African Americans than Caucasians, and in males more than females.

Asthma often runs in families. Children who have brothers, sisters or parents with asthma often will have asthma themselves. Asthma can also be caused by certain types of allergens.

Risk factors for childhood asthma include:asthma-childhood-200x300

• Allergies – environmental or food
• Family history
• Frequent respiratory infections
• Secondhand smoke
• Living in an urban versus suburban area
• African American
• Low birth weight baby

Signs and symptoms:

• Rapid breathing
• Dark circles under the eyes
• Shortness of breath
• Wheezing
• Feeling tired or weak
• Chest pain on exertion

The Ambulatory Care Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center offers a full range of pediatric allergy and asthma services. Please call 718-670-5486 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Your Child and the Battle Against Junk Food

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Childhood obesity has become a common health concern for parents. It is estimated that one in every five children is overweight.  An obese child is considered well above the normal weight for their age and height. One of the contributing factors in obesity is unhealthy eating habits. Parents should introduce healthy eating to children as early as possible.  For some this may be easier said than done, because children love junk food.

What makes junk food enticing to children is sugar, high sodium, the taste of fat-commonly hydrogenated oils, in addition to bright, colorful packaging, fun shapes and unnatural food coloring. Parents can win the fight against junk food by making healthy food more appealing to children’s senses.

Here are a few tips on converting kid favorites into healthier choices:

  • Hot dogs- instead of regular beef and pork hot dogs, purchase low sodium turkey franks and ones without added nitrates. Decorate the hot dog with colorful vegetables such as cucumbers, carrots, red and yellow peppers.
  • Salty cheese snacks- make plain cheese fun by cutting it into quirky shapes or adding bright and sweet fruit. You can make cheese and fruit shish kebabs.
  • French fries- opt for baked sweet potato fries and sprinkle lightly with sea salt. Sweet potatoes are high in vitamin C, B6, and D. They are a great source of Iron, magnesium and potassium.
  • Ice cream- frozen yogurt is just as tasty and contains less sugar and fat. Adding toppings such as fruit and granola is a plus.
  • Popsicles- freeze real fruit juices with bits of fruit into bars.
  • Potato chips- kale chips are rich in vitamin A and easy to make at home. Make them delicious by adding herbs and spices.
  • Candy- healthy alternatives to candy include raisins or strawberries and bananas lightly drizzled with chocolate.
  • Milk shakes- smoothies made with fresh fruit and low fat yogurt are a healthier option.
  • Meat lasagna- load lasagna with vegetables instead of meat, choose low fat cheese and whole-grain pasta.
  • Macaroni and cheese-use low fat cheese and Greek yogurt to make it creamy. Add spinach to make it nutritious.

The battle against junk food is not lost. In addition to healthy eating, keep your family physically active and make an appointment with your family doctor to ensure that everyone is at their recommended weight.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Obesity and Your Teen’s Self Esteem

Feet on a scale

Obesity among teenagers is a growing problem in the United States. It’s estimated that 30% of teenagers are overweight and another 15% are obese.

Many parents and doctors focus on the physical effects of obesity, but what about the psychological and emotional ramifications? Obesity can lead to heart disease, asthma, diabetes, and hypertension, but its depression, low self esteem, anxiety and poor body image that should be the greater concern for most.

Recent studies have concluded that obese teens have considerably lower self esteem than their non-obese peers. The difference in the two groups is most evident among 14 year olds, which also happens to be a critical time for teens because it is when they develop their sense of self worth. It is also an age where peers can be most cruel. Teasing, taunting, and poor treatment from other kids can also contribute to depression and other psychological issues.

Teens with low self-esteem often feel lonely, nervous, or are generally sad. They are also more inclined to experiment with cigarettes, alcohol, and drugs. They often become depressed, which causes them to withdraw from social activities with friends and family and lose interest in activities they once enjoyed.

There are a variety of factors that have contributed to a rise in obesity among teens. While genetics play a role for some, poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle are often the cause for most. Teens today consume too much junk food and sugary drinks and don’t exercise as much as in previous generations. Temptations from television, video games, and computers are often cited as the reasons for a decrease in physical activity.

Professionals suggest that parents of obese teens engage their children in an open dialogue about the issue. Together, parents and teens can work on a plan that is attainable. Efforts to fix the problem should focus on lifestyle issues rather than a calorie count because attempting to impose a strict diet could contribute to the teen’s poor self esteem. Incorporate the assistance of a medical professional, but allow the teen to take charge during visits in an effort to build confidence.  Parents should encourage and participate in improving diet and increasing activity as well.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center has a variety of services to help teens facing this issue, including nutritional counseling and adolescent mental health services. Speak to your child’s pediatrician or make an appointment at the Pediatric Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486 to find the best treatment options for your teen.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Protect Your Children. Get Them Vaccinated.

Do You Vaccinate Your Children?

131577493More and more parents are opting not to have their children immunized against serious medical diseases. Their decisions are largely based on unsubstantiated reports in the media that link vaccines to certain conditions.

April 18-25 is National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases.The fact is vaccines are safe and immunizing your children protects them from more diseases than ever before. Some diseases that were once responsible for thousands of childhood deaths each year have been completely eliminated and others are close to extinction. Unfortunately, because some parents have opted not to get their children vaccinated, there has been a resurgence of certain diseases, such as whopping cough and measles, which has led to an increase in hospitalizations and childhood death.

By vaccinating your child today, you are not only ensuring their protection against a wide variety of illness, but you are also helping to eradicate these diseases for future generations.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Toddlers and Tantrums

Your child is throwing a temper tantrum. It’s every parent’s nightmare, especially if it happens in a public place like a store or restaurant. What is the best way to deal with the situation?

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Tantrums are most common when your child is a toddler, around ages two to three. During this time your child is becoming independent and developing ideas on what they want and need.  Most toddlers aren’t able to express these feelings with words and they haven’t yet learned to share. They test rules over and over by saying “No!” and “Mine!” to see how parents will react.

It is often easier to prevent tantrums than to deal with them after they get going. Try these tips:

 

  • Stick to a daily routine that balances fun activities with enough rest and healthful food.
  • Anticipate when your child will be disappointed, and give your child a choice in small matters. (“We won’t be buying cookies, but you can help me pick out some fruit for later.”)
  • Praise your child when he or she shows self-control and expresses feelings with words.

If you can’t prevent a tantrum, here are some tips for dealing with one:

  • Direct your child’s attention to something else. (“Wow, look at that fire engine!”)
  • Say what you expect from your child and have confidence that your child will behave.
  • Remain calm. Resist overreacting to tantrums, and try to keep your sense of humor. You are a role model for your child.
  • Holding your child during a tantrum may help a younger child feel more secure and calm them down more quickly.
  • Take your child to a quiet place where he or she can calm down safely. Speak softly or play soft music.
  • Some children throw tantrums to seek attention. Try ignoring the tantrum, but pay attention to your child after he or she calms down.

Despite your best efforts, you still might have to deal with a few tantrums. The most important thing you can do is remain calm and wait it out. Do not let your child’s behavior cause you to lose control.

April is National Child Abuse Prevention month. #NCAPM

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Lactation Cookies

Are you a breastfeeding mom who needs a little help boosting your milk supply? Try this healthy, easy and delicious lactation cookie recipe. The addition of Brewer’s Yeast, which contains B vitamins, may help increase milk production. 
Recipe courtesy of Food.com.
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Ingredients
1 cup butter
1 cup sugar
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
4 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons flaxseed meal or ground flaxseeds
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
3 cups oats
1 cup chocolate chips
2-4 tablespoons Brewer’s Yeast
Directions:  
  1. Preheat oven to 350°.
  2. Mix the flaxseed meal and water and let sit for 3-5 minutes.
  3. Beat butter, sugar, and brown sugar well.
  4. Add eggs and mix well.
  5. Add flaxseed mix and vanilla, beat well.
  6. Sift together flour, brewers yeast, baking soda, and salt.
  7. Add dry ingredients to butter mix.
  8. Stir in oats and chips.
  9. Scoop onto baking sheet.
  10. Bake for 12 minutes.
  11. Let set for a couple minutes then remove from tray.

Makes 4 1/2 dozen cookies

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding and Going Back to Work

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding and working is a challenge you can overcome.

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Here are some suggestions designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier:

1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.

2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.

3. Ask if your company provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.

4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care department at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Gummy Vitamins Good for my Child?

Gummy vitamins contain important nutrients to maintain a child’s health, but they can be damaging to your child’s teeth. Similar to candy, gummy vitamins stick to the grooves of your child’s teeth and can cause cavities.

Although your child may brush their teeth the recommended two times per day, toothbrush bristles cannot reach the deepest grooves of the back molars. Sticky sugar particles can remain embedded in the grooves, causing cavities when not brushed properly.

Try switching to traditional chewable tablets if you’re giving your child gummy vitamins. Before the age of two years, speak with your children’s pediatrician or pediatric dentist about a liquid vitamin.

If you believe your child has developed a cavity, ask at your child’s next dental visit or call The Dental Department at Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5521 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.