Focus on Dental Care:  Gum Disease- Sign & Symptoms

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), approximately half of the American population has gum disease or symptoms of it. Affecting women and men alike, no one is excluded from this possible diagnosis- even children are susceptible.

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a contagious bacterial infection that affects the gum tissues and bone that supports the teeth.  Many factors can increase the chances of developing gum disease, such as tobacco use, stress, poor diet, or even genetics.  The hardened plaque, called tartar or calculus, that builds up by the gum line can bring about gingivitis and spread into the underlying bone.  It can start slowly without any pain and may go unnoticed until there is pain.

Some of the symptoms of gum disease can include:

  • Red, sGum Disease_100727067wollen or tender gums/ Gums that bleed when brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Tooth sensitivity for no reason
  • Metallic taste
  • Chronic bad breath
  • Deep pockets (the space between gums and the teeth)

While practicing good dental hygiene, such as regular flossing and brushing after meals, can help slow the progression of such a disease, it is important to schedule regular dental check-ups to prevent gum disease or its progression.

Unfortunately, many people go to the dentist only when they experience some sort of pain or symptom. Don’t let this happen to you.  Keep on top of your oral health and make an appointment with your dentist every 6 months for a dental check- up and deep cleaning.  Contact Flushing Hospital’s Dental Clinic to schedule your appointment at 718-670-5221.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Back to School: Pediatric Stress

Peer pressure, bullying, new school anxiety? Your child may be facing some of these issues prior to the start of the new school year or even day care.

In previous generations, children were not expected to separate from their parents until they were in Kindergarten. For various reasons, many children are now placed in daycare at an earlier age and some children may not be prepared. As for older children, preparing for standardized testing consists of hours of homework every night and children struggling to keep pace with the schools expectation results in additional stress.

Usually, children who have school anxiety show a range of stress-related symptoms such as complaints of aches and pains, no appetite, or lack of sleep. In these instances, the children are not being oppositional; they are simply displaying their anxieties through these physical symptoms. Of course, it is always important to maintain open communication with your children but when should you seek intervention? Always check with your pediatrician to rule out any physical issues.

Some tips provided by Parents Magazine are:
• Reassure your child that it is normal to feel a little scared in new situations, but nervousness should not mean he/she should stay home.
• Remind your child of other first time experiences they have had in the past and reassure them how great they once did in the past.
• Rule out problems at school or at home: ask your child’s teacher about any episodes of bullying or teasing

If after several weeks without positive results, you have tried different approaches, speak with your pediatrician about meeting with a social worker, psychologist or a child psychiatrist. To schedule an appointment with one of our Pediatricians in the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s pediatric ambulatory clinic, please contact 718-670-3007.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dodging Winter Depression

It is estimated that as many as half a million of people in the United States experience Winter-onset depression, a type of depression associated with cold-Winter months.  With a physician’s help, however, Winter-onset depression is a treatable condition.

Winter-onset depression is the most common form of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a type of depression associated with changing seasons.  The cause of the condition is unclear, but it may be related to changes in an individual’s circadian rhythm (biological clock) that result from reduced exposure to sunlight in the Winter.

Winter-onset SAD typically lasts from late Fall or early Winter to the beginning of the Summer.  SAD usually appears in people ages 20 or older, with women experiencing more cases of the disorder than men.  SAD is more likely to occur as a person ages, and individuals in northern regions are more vulnerable to Winter-onset SAD.

Every person’s experience with Winter-onset SAD is different, but common symptoms include:

  • Changes in appetite
  • Weight gain
  • Low energy level and fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Irritability and anxiety
  • Avoidance of social situations
  • Lack of interest in favorite activities

Winter-onset SAD is fairly predictable, as symptoms tend to occur at the same time each year.  “Many people with Winter-onset SAD may benefit from seeing a psychiatrist, who can assess patient’s symptoms and formulate a treatment plan,” says Dr. Seeth Vivek, Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.  “Possible treatments include medication, behavior therapy, and light therapy.”

Light therapy acts as a substitute for the limited sunlight during the Winter months.  Patients receiving this treatment sit in front of a light box or wear a light visor for 30 minutes per day, and if the therapy proves to be effective, they continue it until the Spring.  Light therapy has few effects, though it can cause eyestrain and headache.

When it comes to preventing Winter-onset SAD, your best bet is to stay active.  Search for activities to do around the house that you put off, and guard against isolation by scheduling get-togethers with friends.

To make an appointment or to speak with a member of the Department of Psychiatry, please call 718-670-5562.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.