Benefits of Eating Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate has received a great deal of attention because it’s believed to help protect your cardiovascular system. The reason being is that the cocoa bean is rich in a class of plant nutrients called flavonoids.

Higher grades of dark chocolate are where you will find an abundance of flavonoids.

Some benefits to adding a moderate amount of dark chocolate to your diet are:

  • Nutrition – If the dark chocolate you are eating has a high cocoa content it will also have a sufficient amount of soluble fiber and will be rich with minerals.
  • Antioxidants – Dark chocolate is loaded with organic compounds that are biologically active and function as antioxidants, such as polyphenols, flavanols and catechins to name a few.
  • Blood Flow and Hypertension – The bioactive compounds in cocoa have been known to improve blood flow in the arteries and cause a small but significant decrease in blood pressure.
  • Heart Disease – Eating dark chocolate has shown to be beneficial in improving several important risk factors for heart disease, reducing insulin resistance, increase high density lipoprotein (HDL or “good” cholesterol) and decreasing low density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad” cholesterol). These reductions could show decrease in cardiovascular disease.

Be careful about the type of dark chocolate you choose: chewy caramel-marshmallow-nut-covered dark chocolate is by no means a heart-healthy food option. Watch out for those extra ingredients that can add lots of extra fat and calories.

There is currently no established serving size of dark chocolate to help you reap the cardiovascular benefits it may offer, and more research is needed in this area. So, for now, it is recommended that a moderate portion of chocolate (e.g., 1 ounce) a few times per week is sufficient while eating other flavonoid-rich foods (lettuce, almonds, strawberries, celery oranges, etc.).

Even though there is evidence that eating dark chocolate can provide health benefits, it doesn’t mean you should over indulge.  It is still loaded with calories and easy to overeat.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Healthy Eating Promote Successful Wound Healing?

The nutritional status of a patient plays a large role in their body’s ability undergo wound healing. It requires a higher than normal level of energy and nutrients if it is going to be successful. The body requires an additional 35 calories per kilogram of body weight to help a chronic wound to heal. This will include eating a well-balanced diet that includes protein, grains, fruits, vegetables, and dairy.

A balanced diet should include 1.5 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight. A kilogram is equal to 2.2 pounds. Keeping hydrated is also very important, eight glasses of water per day should be the minimum and more if the person sweats profusely, has a wound that is draining, or if vomiting and or diarrhea are present. Meals should include meats, eggs, milk, cheese, nuts, seeds, yogurt and dried beans. In some people who have difficulty obtaining proper caloric intake from their daily meals, high protein and high calorie shakes can be used as supplements. Two amino acids, found in foods having protein and that have been identified as having potential to help wound healing are arginine and glutamine.


People with diabetes often have difficulty with wound healing, and this is due to poor circulation, nerve damage which leads to the constant breakdown of healthy tissue components needed to heal, and a higher than normal level of sugar in the blood which can lead to higher rates of infection and causes fluids to be drained from the body. It is therefore very important for a person with diabetes to keep tight control of their disease.
Wound healing also requires additional levels of vitamins and minerals, however care must be taken too not take in more that the daily recommended amounts because this can have a negative effect on the body.


It is important to consult with a physician about how to eat successfully when trying to heal a wound and also a nutritionist who specializes in wound care.
If you have a chronic or non-healing wound, you may be a candidate for Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s outpatient Wound Care Center. To schedule an appointment or speak with a clinician, please call 718-670-4542

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pleasing Your Picky Eater

Feeding a picky eater

Inventing ways to please a picky eater is part of what it means to be a parent. Mealtime can be a constant battle and many parents worry about what their children eat — and don’t eat. However, you can avoid the mealtime battles and win the war for your child’s proper nutrition by considering these tips:

  1. Stick to the routine. Serve meals and snacks at about the same times every day. Keeping your child on an eating schedule will allow their bodies to tell them when they’re hungry.
  2. Make it fun. Include dipping sauces with fruits and veggies for a light snack or use shaped cookie cutters to make foods look more appealing to your child.
  3. Let them cook. Children are more likely to eat their own creations, so, when appropriate, let your picky eater help prepare the food. Give your little chef jobs such as tearing and washing lettuce, scrubbing potatoes, or stirring batter.
  4. Go shopping together. When grocery shopping let your child choose some fruits and vegetables. Doing this will help familiarize them to good foods and they will be more excited to try these foods at home.
  5. Be patient. This is the most important tip. When introducing new foods to your child there will be some hits and some misses but you shouldn’t give up.

Luckily for most parents, raising a picky eater is a short-lived phase for their child. Using these tips can improve your child’s willingness to try new things. For more information on tracking your child’s development and nutrition, schedule regular check-ups with their pediatrician. The Department of Pediatrics at Flushing Hospital Medical Center provides care to infants, children and young adults. To make an appointment, please call 718-670-5486.

For more hospital events, highlights, health and fitness tips, visit us on 

Facebook.com/JamaicaHospital  or Facebook.com/Flushing Hospital 

and follow us on Twitter @JamaicaHospital or @FHMC_NYC

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hey! I Thought This Was Healthy

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Optimal health is a goal for many but is sometimes easier said than done. In this day and age there are so many diet fads and new health trends that inspire us for a moment and create shortcuts to a seemingly healthy lifestyle. However, everything that might seem good for you can actually be bad for you. Let’s take a look at some popular health beverages that are actually junk food in disguise.

  1. Fruit Juices

When you go to the supermarket you see a lot of juices that claim to have 100% fruit juice. That must be healthy because it comes from a fruit right? Wrong. A lot of the fruit juice is not really fruit juice. Sometimes there isn’t even any actual fruit in there, just chemicals that taste like fruit. What you’re drinking is basically just fruit-flavored sugar water. Fruit juice is like fruit, except with all the good stuff (like the fiber) taken out, only leaving you with sugar.

  1. Sports Drinks

Sports drinks were designed with athletes in mind. Whether you are committing to a steady workout routine or joining a local sports team to stay in shape, you might grab a sports drink every once in a while to stay hydrated. These drinks contain electrolytes (salts) and sugar, which can be useful for athletes in many cases. However, most regular people don’t need any additional salts, and they certainly have no need for liquid sugar. Although often considered “less bad” than sugary soft drinks, there really is no fundamental difference except that the sugar content is sometimes slightly lower. It is important to stay hydrated, especially around workouts, but most people will be better off sticking to plain water.

  1. Smoothies

Smoothies have long been the darling of the health-food world. Although some smoothies made with simple, whole-food ingredients can be healthy, don’t get fooled into thinking anything with the name “smoothie” is good for you. Some smoothies are made with lots of added sugars, high-calorie ingredients like chocolate syrup, or even use full-fat ice cream as a base. Your best smoothie bet? Make one at home so that you know exactly what’s in it.

 

  1. Diet Sodas

The word “diet” doesn’t always equal healthy, and that’s certainly the case for diet soda. Made with artificial ingredients and flavorings, it’s not only unnatural and high in sodium, but regular diet soda drinkers have been shown to eat more calories after consuming diet cola. While the reasons aren’t fully understood, researchers suspect it’s the body’s way of making up for calories it thinks it received in the diet soda but didn’t.

Today we learned that foods that look good for us are not always the best for us. If you saw some of your favorite beverages on here remember that the fresh way is the best way! Carefully read all of your labels before consumption and look out for liquids that are high in sugars, fats and sodium.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Does Obesity Effect Your Circulation?

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New York now has the 12th lowest adult obesity rate in the nation, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America. New York’s adult obesity rate is currently 27.0 percent. Although the percentages are slightly decreasing, obesity can be the cause of life-threatening health issues for many. The most common health-related issues caused by obesity are hypertension, diabetes and heart disease but, obesity can also lead to poor circulation which can cause blood clots.

The most common symptoms of poor circulation include: tingling, numbness, throbbing or stinging pain in limbs and muscle cramps. Your body’s circulation system is responsible for sending blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout your body. When blood flow to a specific part of your body is reduced, you may experience the symptoms of poor circulation. As a result of poor circulation blood clots will form in your body. Poor circulation is most common in your extremities, such as your legs and arms.

Blood clots can develop for a variety of reasons, and they can be dangerous. If a blood clot in your leg breaks away, it can pass through other parts of your body, including your heart or lungs. When this happens, the results may be serious, even deadly. If discovered early, a blood clot can often be treated successfully.

Discuss symptoms of poor circulation with your doctor. If you’re experiencing uncomfortable symptoms, they may be the sign of an underlying health condition. Other untreated conditions can lead to serious complications. Your doctor will work to determine the cause of your poor circulation and treat the underlying issue.

The journey to improved health begins with an improved diet. Here at Jamaica Hospital, the Nutrition Department offers outpatient services at our Ambulatory Care Center as well as many of our MediSys Family Care Centers, located throughout the communities we serve. To make an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.