National Depression Screening Day

 

Thursday October 11th has been designated as National Depression Screening Day, an annual event held during Mental Illness Awareness Week. This event was started 28 years ago as an effort to provide people with mental health education materials and resources for support services. National Depression Screening Day was also created with the hope of removing the stigma from mental illness.

This year the focus of the observation is to have people reach out to their friends, family, co-workers and neighbors who might benefit from information on this condition and to avail themselves to the many opportunities to receive a free screening, either in person or online. It is estimated that worldwide there are 350 million people that suffer from depression.

The World Health Organization states that early recognition and treatment of the disease offers the best opportunity for successful outcomes. If depression is left untreated it can lead to suicide.

Depression screenings help to distinguish between short term feelings of sadness and stress due to transient life episodes, and more severe symptoms that can go on for months and years. The tests usually last between two to five minutes and the scores will indicate whether a further evaluation by a mental health professional is needed. It is important for people to know that help is available.

To schedule an appointment with the Mental Health Department of Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5562.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and Depression

.

Diabetes does not directly cause depression but can contribute to it indirectly for a variety of reasons. Managing diabetes can be very stressful and it does require a modification of eating habits and, to some degree, a modification of lifestyle. Many people have difficulty keeping their blood sugar under control and this can also lead to frustration and potentially be a cause of depression.
Signs of depression include:
• Change in appetite
• Change in sleep pattern
• Loss of interest in doing things that were once enjoyable
• Trouble concentrating
• Lack of energy
• Feeling suicidal
If diabetes is not well controlled then variations in blood sugar level, high or low, can lead to symptoms that are similar to depression.
Similarly, depression can lead to the onset of diabetes. When people are depressed their eating habits tend to be affected and many people will over eat to the point of becoming obese. Some people who are depressed have no desire to be physically active, and many will also smoke. All of these are risk factors for diabetes.
There are ways to manage both diabetes and depression simultaneously. The most important factor is to speak with a physician who has experience and can help you to gain control of these illnesses. A patient who has been diagnosed with diabetes might also benefit from a program that focuses on behavior modification that will lead to a healthier lifestyle. There are medications that can be prescribed which will be helpful in managing these illnesses. Seeking the help of a psychotherapist will also be helpful in gaining confidence in the ability to manage both diseases.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital to discuss diabetes management please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and Depression

Depression-300x200

Diabetes does not directly cause depression but can contribute to it for a variety of reasons. Managing diabetes can be stressful because of the dietary and lifestyle changes required to stay healthy.  Some diabetics may have a difficult time adapting to these changes and become frustrated which can eventually lead to depression.

Conversely, depression can  lead to diabetes.  When people are depressed their eating habits tend to be affected and some may overeat to the point of becoming obese. They may also have no desire in being physically active. These factors can increase an individual’s  risk of developing the disease.

There are ways to manage diabetes and depression simultaneously. The most important factor is to speak with a physician who has experience and can help you to gain control of these illnesses. A patient who has been diagnosed with diabetes might benefit from a program that focuses on behavior modifications promoting a healthier lifestyle.  There are also medications which can be prescribed that are helpful in managing both illnesses.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center understands  the relationship between mental and physical health and has many programs in place to ensure our medical and mental health professionals work together  to treat both mind and body.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital to discuss diabetes management please call 718-670 5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Supports World Suicide Prevention Day

Suicide affects millions; over 800,000 people take their lives each year, and the number of people who attempt suicide is twenty five times that amount. In addition to the lives lost, suicide also affects the many friends and family members devastated by the loss of their loved one.

Suicide is largely preventable though. Through education and awareness, we can get those people who are contemplating suicide the help they need.

Educational and Creative composition with the message Stop Suicide

One of the best tools in preventing suicide is to know the risk factors. Over 90% of people who attempt suicide live with depression or another mental disorder. Alcohol or substance abuse is often a contributing factor. Adverse reactions to traumatic events or stress can also lead to someone wanting to take their own life.

Other risk factors for suicide include:
• Family history of mental disorder or substance abuse
• Family history of suicide
• Family violence
• Physical or sexual abuse
• Keeping firearms in the home
• Chronic physical illness, including chronic pain
• Exposure to the suicidal behavior of others

Someone who is considering suicide usually displays certain behaviors. Loved ones should look for the following warning signs:

Always talking or thinking about death
Trouble sleeping and eating — that gets worse over time
Displaying reckless behavior that could result in death, such as driving fast or running red lights
Losing interest in things one used to care about
Making comments about being hopeless, helpless, or worthless
Talking about suicide or killing one’s self
Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

If someone you know appears to be contemplating suicide, take the issue seriously. Let the person know that you care and understand and are listening and attempt to get them immediate help from a health care professional.

If your loved one appears to be in imminent danger of committing suicide, do not leave him or her alone. Remove any weapons or drugs he or she could use. Accompany him or her to the nearest emergency room or call 911.

September 10 has been designated World Suicide Prevention Day. Many organizations from around the world have joined this cause. Flushing Hospital’s supports their efforts and the hospital’s Department of Psychiatry offers many inpatient and outpatient services to help those in need.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Midlife Crisis or Depression?

midlife crisis

The idea of a “midlife crisis” in popular culture is when you do outrageous, impractical things such as straying from your marriage, buying sports cars or impulsively quitting you job.

A midlife crisis is better known as a midlife transition to mental health experts, who say this time in a person’s life is sometimes accompanied by depression.

The key is to realize when your transition is developing into depression.

Some signs that your midlife transition may be rooted in depression are:

  • Extreme change in eating habits
  • Consistently fatigued and exhausted
  • Change in sleeping patterns
  • A feeling of hopelessness, guilt or worthlessness
  • Irritable, restless or unexpected bouts of anger
  • Thoughts or attempts of suicide
  • Decrease or increase in desire and ambition
  • Compulsion for alcohol or drugs
  • Desire for a sexual affair
  • Feeling overwhelmingly trapped by responsibilities, such as
    financial, family and job
  • Consistent desire to run away from responsibilities
  • Doing things out of character that could lead to trouble

Studies have shown that 88% of Americans who are experiencing depression during their midlife transition have reported difficulty at work, home or with otherwise simple social activities.  Unfortunately, only 35% of them had seen a mental health professional for support or treatment.

A midlife transition can be one of the most stress-filled phases in your life’s journey.  Seeking the assistance from a mental health professional during this time can save relationships, finances and other aspects of your life.

If you are experiencing the symptoms of a midlife transitional depression, call for an appointment at the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Mental Health Center.  For more information or to make an appointment, call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Your Nest About To Empty?

emptynestpic-149735202-300x171

If your last child is all grown up and about to leave home, or he or she has already moved out, you may experience some mixed emotions or what’s commonly called, empty next syndrome.

Empty nest syndrome is not a clinical diagnosis. It is a phenomenon in which parents may experience feelings of sadness and loss when their last child leaves home. You may worry how well your child will function in the world without your parental supervision and question their ability to take care of themselves. If you are the parent of an only child, you may have a particularly difficult time adjusting to an empty nest.

Many parents experiencing empty nest syndrome are confused by these feelings since they actively encouraged their child to become independent. Still, letting go can be painful. The feeling of not being needed by your child anymore, missing being a part of your child’s daily lives, as well as missing the constant companionship of your child can cause some parents to have mild bouts of depression, identity crisis, alcoholism and marital conflicts.

Some tips to help you overcome empty nest syndrome are:

  • Prepare for the departure – Take time to check that your child is aware of how to do the basic essentials for themselves such as, how to wash their clothes, cook for themselves, balance a checkbook and appreciate the value of money.
  • Shift aside the terrifying thoughts – Both you and your child will be better off if you treat this as a big adventure. Try not to transfer your fears onto your child. Help them to understand that once they’re into their new routine, it will be familiar, fun and successful.
  • Explore the ways that you intend to keep in touch with your child – Keeping in constant communication is vital for maintaining a sense of family togetherness and to keep of with the news. Schedule a weekly call-in time, utilize e-mail, texting, social media, Skype, or Face Time as a way of touching base while being sensitive to their need to grow and become their own adult person.
  • Start looking toward your own needs – Once you are satisfied that you child is settled on the right bath, you will start noticing a big change in your life. This is a great time to revive some of your own interests and pursuits.
  • Rediscover the love of your life – Unless you are a single parent, you will be left with your spouse or partner. Re-kindling the relationship you shared, pre-children, can be an exciting adventure of your own to take.
  • Focus on some of the positive points of your kids moving out – You may notice that the refrigerator does not need as frequent refilling, there are less trips to the grocery store and the laundry has decreased. Seeing the brighter side will help you while you are transitioning.

As the time for your child to fly the next approaches, try to reflect on each stage in your child’s life. Each ending was a new beginning. Stay positive, the fact that your child has confidently left home means you’ve done a great job as a parent. After leaving the nest, you can forge a new and even better relationship with your child as independent adults. Enjoy the friendship without having the pressure of hands-on parenting

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Music to Your Ears – How Music Affects Our Mood

man face silhouette in profile with musical hair

Music has been known to make us smile, excite us, make us dance or bring us to tears.  It can bring back a memory so vividly that we actually feel we are there.

Music can stabilize or have an enhancing effect on our mood, but how does it have this profound power over a person’s emotions?

Maybe because it is a common phenomenon that crosses all boarders of nationality, race and culture.  Music is often used as a tool for arousing feelings and can be far more impactful than language.

Did you know that when we listen to a musical rhythm, our heart can actually begin to synch with it?  Studies have shown that a “major key” will signify cheerful communication to our brain, while a “minor key” can bring on sighs and lamentations. All of this has an effect on the brain, which directs our psyche to feel what’s being communicated to us.

In many instances, music is utilized for treating depressed or anxious patients since the meter, timber, rhythm and pitch of musical arrangements are managed in areas of the brain that deal with emotions and mood.

Although the overall phenomenon still has its certain level of mystery, many people turn to music for a general sense of well-being.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Top 5 Women’s Health Issues

hypertension-87650188Do you know which health conditions pose the biggest threat to American women? The good news is that many of the leading threats to women’s health, which can vary based on a woman’s age and background, are preventable. Find out which conditions to be aware of to maximize your health today.

  1. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women. Luckily, there are many lifestyle changes you can make to ward off heart disease, such as not smoking, following a heart-smart diet, and being physically active.

 

  1. Stroke poses a significant risk to women’s health in the United States. Almost 55,000 women suffer from stroke each year, and about 60 percent of overall stroke deaths occur among women.

 

  1. Two of the most common cancers affecting women are breast and cervical cancers. Early detection is the key to keeping women alive and healthy. The most recent figures show that around half a million women die from cervical cancer and half a million from breast cancer each year.

 

  1. Sexually transmitted diseases are responsible for one third of health issues for women between the ages of 15 and 44 years. Unsafe sex is a major risk factor – particularly among women and girls in developing countries.

 

  1. Depression is the most common mental health problem for women and suicide a leading cause of death for women under 60. Evidence suggests that women are more prone than men to experience anxiety, depression, and somatic complaints – physical symptoms that cannot be explained medically.

 

The first step to staying healthy is educating yourself, and then taking the necessary precautions to reduce your risk. While you can’t eliminate risk factors such as family history, you can control many other risk factors for heart disease, stroke and cancer. Also be sure to consult your doctor about when you should have mammograms and other cancer screenings. The Outpatient Mental Health Division at Flushing Hospital Medical Center has an experienced and friendly staff readily available to assist you. To make an appointment please call, 718-670-5562. If you are experiencing stroke or heart disease symptoms please refer to the Ambulatory Care Center at Flushing Hospital. To make an appointment, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Depression Screening Day

 

October 8 is recognized as National Depression Screening Day. Started in 1990, the day helps promote awareness of the signs and symptoms of depression and provides those who need it mental health information and access to support services. Depression-300x200

Though many mental health conditions are treatable, many people go through life not seeking help because they are undiagnosed. Medical professionals estimate that one in five Americans has a mental health condition in any given year and less than half will receive treatment.

Depression affects one in 10 adults and is more common in women than in men.  Depression can be categorized either as  Major Depression which interferes with the ability to sleep, eat, work and study or as Persistent Depressive Disorder which lasts for at least two years having varying levels of severity and which does include Major Depression during this time. Depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors.

Signs and symptoms of depression include:

• Waking up and feeling exhausted
• Sleeplessness
• Difficulty concentrating
• Short temper
• Always worrying or anxious
• Lack of energy
• Sadness

Take this quick and easy depression screening tool to see how you are doing.
(This screening tool © Copyright Mental Health America”)

Depression is real and there are ways to treat it. Treatment options include therapy with a trained professional and in some situations medication may be prescribed.  If you would like to make an appointment to speak to one of the mental health professionals at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5562.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.