Blood Pressure – Keeping it Under Control in the New Year

Soon it will be the beginning of the New Year and many of us will make resolutions to do things better than the previous year. For many people this means living healthy, losing weight, and keeping our blood pressure under control.

High blood pressure affects one in three Americans. If not controlled well it can lead to kidney problems, damaged blood vessels, stroke, and heart attacks. There are many factors that can cause blood pressure to be elevated including obesity, stress, smoking, high sodium diets and elevated cholesterol. Ideally, managing some of these factors can help to maintain a blood pressure that is as close to normal range (120/80mmHg) as possible.

There are many ways that doctors can help us to control our blood pressure, Your doctor can prescribe medication that will help. Additionally other methods include:

  • Quitting smoking
  • Lose weight
  • Stress reduction
  • Exercise regularly
  • Eat less salty food
  • Eliminate beverages that contain caffeine
  • Eat dark chocolate
  • Cut back on sugar
  • Drink less alcohol

Keeping your blood pressure under control is probably one of the most important things you can do to keep yourself healthy. Speak to your doctor about methods that would work best for you.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital to discuss how you can lower your blood pressure in 2018, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Exposure to the Sun Affect Your Blood Pressure?

High blood pressure (or hypertension) is a common, yet potentially very serious health condition that can lead to heart disease or stroke. To combat hypertension, doctors usually recommend that their patients follow a healthy, low salt diet and exercise regularly, but is there another simple thing that we all can do to lower our blood pressure?

Recent studies have indicated that spending more time outdoors in the sun can lower your lower pressure. What was found is that nitric oxide stored in the top layers of the skin reacts to sunlight and cause blood vessels to widen as the oxide moves into the bloodstream. That, in turn, lowers blood pressure.  The research, which was conducted by British researchers at the University of Southampton, exposed individuals with blood pressure within normal range to ultra violet light.  After exposure, those in the study saw a modest decrease in blood pressure levels. Researchers believe that the drop will be even more significant in individuals with elevated blood pressure.

Additional studies have concluded that people with higher levels of Vitamin D ( a vitamin that is commonly linked to sun exposure), experienced lower blood pressure levels and were at lower risk of developing hypertension. In fact, according to one recent study, for every 10 percent increase in vitamin D levels, there was an 8 percent decrease in the risk of developing hypertension.

Lastly, blood pressure levels tend to fluctuate seasonally, with levels typically being at their highest during the winter months. There are many potential factors for this, including  changing weather patterns and increased weight gain during the winter, but could more sun exposure be a factor in lower blood pressure during summer months?

This information does not mean that those looking to lower their blood pressure should rely on sun exposure as their only form of treatment against hypertension, nor should individuals ignore the potential dangers of prolonged, unprotected exposure to the. This research merely suggests that, if done responsibly, exposure to the sun can have a positive effect on your blood pressure levels.

If you have hypertension, speak with your physician about how increased sun exposure may benefit your condition. If you do not have a doctor, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is American Heart Month

Over 50 years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed the month of February to be American Heart Month in order to bring attention to one of the leading causes of death in the United States. This tradition has been carried on by every President since.
Each year over 800,000 lives are taken as a result of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.  Every 84 seconds someone in the United States dies from the disease and each year approximately 750,000 people experience a heart attack and of those, about 115,000 will not survive.
The American Heart Association recommends the following behavioral modifications to prevent heart disease:
• Avoid smoking
• Engage in some form of daily physical activity
• Follow a healthy diet
• Maintain a healthy body weight
• Control cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels
The death rate from heart disease has been improving slowly over the last decade due to advances in medications, better diagnostic capabilities, and better access to health care, but the statistics are still pretty alarming. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Blood Pressure – Keeping it Under Control in the New Year

It is the beginning of the New Year and many of us will make resolutions to do things better than the previous year. For many people this means living healthy, losing weight, and keeping our blood pressure under control.
High blood pressure affects one in three Americans. If not controlled well it can lead to kidney problems, damaged blood vessels, stroke, and heart attacks. There are many factors that can cause blood pressure to be elevated including obesity, stress, smoking, high sodium diets and elevated cholesterol. Ideally, managing some of these factors can help to maintain a blood pressure that is as close to normal range (120/80mmHg) as possible.
There are many ways that doctors can help us to control our blood pressure, Your doctor can prescribe medication that will help. Additionally other methods include:
• Quitting smoking
• Lose weight
• Stress reduction
• Exercise regularly
• Eat less salty food
• Eliminate beverages that contain caffeine
• Eat dark chocolate
• Cut back on sugar
• Drink less alcohol
Keeping your blood pressure under control is probably one of the most important things you can do to keep yourself healthy. Speak to your doctor about methods that would work best for you.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital to discuss how you can lower your blood pressure in 2018, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.