Flushing Hospital’s New Tool Helps Calm Hospitalized Children

Medical procedures such as blood draws, IV placements, drain removals, and dressing changes can be frightening and unsettling, especially for children. They often need distractions to help them to cope with the fear and anxiety of undergoing these processes.

In an effort to provide children with tools that promote positive coping, Flushing Hospital Medical Center has purchased a Vecta Deluxe  Mobile Sensory  Station with the help of a generous grant from the enCourage Kids Foundation’s Pediatric Hospital Program.

The new multisensory device is designed to keep children distracted by keeping them engaged with its many interactive and calming features such as a projector that displays images such as tropical fish, an aromatic dispenser, a bubble column and fiber optics cables that change colors. Through play and interaction, the Vecta will help patients to alleviate some of the discomforts they may encounter in a medical environment. The machine is mobile and enables the staff to transform any room into a fun or relaxing space.

The sensory station is utilized by Flushing Hospital’s Child Life program where Child Life Specialists such as Rashmi Momaya provide emotional support to children by engaging them in fun and educational activities.

“Hospitalization can be frightening. The Vecta Sensory Station has proven to be effective in helping children to remain engaged and relaxed during procedures. The feedback we have received from patients and parents has been tremendously positive,” shared Rashmi.

Rashmi continued, Flushing Hospital’s Child Life Program is thrilled to have acquired another tool that will help us to provide the best service and care for our patients.”

Flushing Hospital’s Child Life Program aims to meet the special needs of children in our care. Our Child Life Specialists are trained to help patients to overcome fear and anxiety through play, support and education in a safe environment.  We strive to offer patients and families a positive hospital experience.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The History of the EKG Machine

An EKG machine measures the electrical activity of the heart. It displays this activity by drawing waves on a piece of paper that is either displayed on a screen or drawn on a piece of paper that runs through a machine.
• Late 1700’s – The first step in the development of the modern electrocardiograph machine was the creation of a machine that could sense, but not measure, electric current. This machine was called a galvanometer.
• 1786 an Italian physician, Dr. Luigi Galvan, discovered that skeletal muscles worked by producing electric current. In
• 1842 Dr. Carlo Matteucci working at the University of Pisa discovered that there is an electrical current that comes with each heart beat in a frog.
• Mid 1800’s a machine called the “Rheotome” was invented that could now measure this electrical current.
• 1872 – further refinements to this Rheotome led to a machine devised by Gabrrile Lippman  of the “capillary electrometer”.
During this time, a British physiologist, Augustus Waller, was able to record the first human electrocardiogram that using this technology with electrodes placed on the chest and back of a patient. This demonstrated electric activity taking place before ventricular contraction. In
• 1893 – Dr. Wilhelm Einthoven, a Dutch physiologist,  refined the capillary electrometer to show five deflections in the electrical current passing through the heart. The five waves were initially called ABCDE, but were changed to PQRST after a mathematical correction was made to compensate for the inertia in the capillary tube. He used the phrase “electrocardiogram” for the first time at a meeting of Dutch physicians.  In
• 1901 – Dr. Eintoven he developed a string galvanometer, a more sensitive machine. He  was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for his invention of the electrocardiograph.
As time passed, the electrocardiograph machine became much smaller and much more accurate. In 1903 it weighed 600 pounds and by 1930 it weighed about 30 pounds. The importance of an electrocardiograph was recognized as being essential in diagnosing cardiac from non-cardiac pain and able to help diagnose a myocardial infarction or a heart attack. Today we use a 12 lead electrocardiogram as a major tool in diagnosing heart disease. The machine today weighs just a few pounds and is an essential tool in diagnosing diseases of the heart.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Low-Sodium Baked Salmon Recipe

A low-sodium diet can reduce the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular disease and kidney damage.

The American Heart Association recommends no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium should be consumed per day

Here are the approximate amounts of sodium in a given amount of table salt:

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt = 575 mg sodium
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt = 1,150 mg sodium
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt = 1,725 mg sodium
  • 1 teaspoon salt = 2,300 mg sodium

If you are interested in lowering your sodium, this recipe for baked salmon is a good place to start.  For this and other low sodium recipes you can go to –

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/salmon-baked-in-foil-recipe.html#lightbox-recipe-video

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Warning Signs of a Painkiller Addiction

Prescription painkiller addiction has become a growing and serious problem in the United States.  A 2016 study conducted by the National Study on Drug Use and Health found that an estimated 54 million people living in the United States have used prescription drugs for non-medical reasons at some point during their lifetime.

While narcotic painkillers are designed to significantly reduce a person’s sensitivity to pain, they can also create a short-lived sense of euphoria. Some people may crave this sensation and become addicted, as they want to experience this feeling more frequently and for longer periods of time. Long-term or misappropriate use of prescription painkillers can lead to physical dependence.

A person can become addicted to painkillers over time; however, there are often tell-tale signs that indicate a growing addiction. They include:

  • Feeling the need to use the drug regularly
  • Experiencing intense urges that interrupt other thoughts
  • Taking more medications than prescribed by a doctor
  • Going doctor shopping to find physicians to provide a prescription
  • Taking medications longer than prescribed by a doctor
  • Seeking other sources such as relative’s medicine cabinets or the internet to get prescription painkillers
  • Afflicting injuries to oneself to attain painkillers
  • Continuing to take the medications although they affect job performance, relationships or the ability to carry out routine activities
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop drug use

Paying attention to these signs is crucial in getting the necessary help needed in a timely manner. The sooner a problem is recognized is the sooner help can be received. If you or someone you know are displaying these signs, speak to your doctor or a professional who specializes in addiction medicine immediately.

To schedule an appointment with Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  Addiction Service Division please call 718-670-5078.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Spring, NYSS and Flushing Hospital Offer the Safe and Effective Obalon Non-Surgical Weight Loss Procedure for Those Looking to Shed Their Winter Weight

Spring is here and with it comes the promise of warmer weather. For many, this time of year also brings with it renewed attempts to shed the extra pounds they put on over the winter. If you have tried repeatedly to lose weight through conventional diet and exercise , but have been unsuccessful and bariatric surgery is not for you, doctors at Flushing Hospital may have a safe and effective weight-loss option for you.

Doctors Sanjeev Rajpal, Darshak Shah and Noman Khan of New York Surgical Specialists (NYSS) are all excited that they are some of the only physicians in the area to offer their patients the revolutionary, Obalon weight loss system. Obalon is the first and only non-surgical, and completely non-invasive weight loss treatment option approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Patients who participate in Obalon treatment swallow a small, coated capsule connected to a thin tube. Once the capsule is digested, it naturally dissolves and a small, lightweight gastric balloon unfolds. This balloon is then remotely filled with medical gases via the tube before it is removed. The balloon, once fully inflated, is only the size of a small orange.

This procedure is repeated two more times over a six month period. Once expanded, the three balloons work to facilitate weight loss by taking up space within the stomach, enabling patients to become fuller while eating less.

Each procedure only takes 10 minutes, requires no sedation and can be performed in the NYSS office. After six months the balloons are removed endoscopically while the patient is under light, conscious sedation.

Throughout the entire three-stage, six month process, patients will receive nutritional and exercise support from Flushing Hospital’s weight loss team.

The Obalon Weight Loss System offers many benefits to those patients, who do not qualify for, or are seeking an alternative to bariatric surgery, including:

  • Obalon is clinical proven to be twice as effective as diet and exercise alone
  • There are minimal risks or side effects
  • No sedation is required and the entire procedure only takes 10 minutes
  • Obalon is affordable as compared to other surgical weight loss options, but it is not currently covered by most insurance providers
  • Patients can resume their normal daily lifestyle immediately
  • The procedure is completely reversible

Not everyone is a candidate for the Obalon weight loss system. To qualify, patients must be:

  • At least 22 years old
  • Have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30-40
  • Have not had any form of weight loss surgery
  • Are actively attempting to lose weight through diet and exercise
  • Are committed to maintaining a healthy lifestyle during and after treatment

To learn more information about the Obalon weight loss system, or to make an appointment with one of our highly qualified physicians, please call 718-408-6977.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Alex Regoso

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Employee Spotlight for March shines on Alex Regoso.

Alex is the Lead Operator for the hospital’s switchboard for the past 12 years, often times being the first voice our patients and visitors hear. He is responsible for maintaining the hospital’s phone system, pagers and pager systems but that isn’t all he does.  It’s safe to say that Alex Regoso is the “go to techie” for anyone who needs help with their audio visual presentation

He and his wife Michelle have two children, Aiden (12) and Zoe (9).  When asked what he likes to do when he  isn’t at FHMC, Alex responded that he can be found “Cooking, (Alex has a BA in Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts) eating, traveling, being involved in this children’s lives and activities, as well as practicing Filipino Martial Arts (FMA).  “

“Flushing Hospital has always been a part of my life.  I was born here, my mom provided for her family by working here and now I provide for my family by working at FHMC.  A bit of history that Alex shared is, his mom Rose worked in the NICU from 1970 – 2006. Flushing Hospital Medical Center is a big family and I am happy to help anyone who enters its doors.”

Admitting that some days can be more stressful than others, Alex stated, “I leave work stress behind at the exit doors and never take it home with me.

When you ask his co-workers what is most notable about Alex, they are quick to respond that he always has a positive attitude, is always willing to help and does so with a smile.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Often Should You Have Your Vision Checked ?

March is Save Your Vision Month
How often should you have your vison checked?
A) Every year
B) Every two years
C) Every three years
D) Only when something is wrong
According to the American Optometric Association a healthy person should have a regular eye exam once a year. People who have any conditions that may affect their eyesight, for example diabetes, glaucoma, macula-degeneration, should be examined more frequently.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes Alert Day

March 27 is Diabetes Alert Day. The observance created by the American Diabetes Association, is held the last Tuesday in March each year to help raise awareness about the seriousness of diabetes when it is left undiagnosed or untreated.

Diabetes affects approximately 30 million people living in the United States and nearly 1 in 4 is unaware that they have the disease.

Undiagnosed or untreated diabetes can develop into more complicated health conditions that can include kidney damage, heart disease, nerve damage or stroke.

Learning if you are at risk and taking the necessary steps to prevent or treat diabetes can lower your chances of developing serious illnesses that result from the disease.

Some people are more at risk than others. You may be at risk if you:

  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have a family history of diabetes
  • Are African American, Asian American, Hispanic, American Indian or Pacific Islander
  • Are physically inactive
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Have abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels

The American Diabetes Association also encourages you to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/?loc=alertday.

There are several lifestyle changes you can adopt to lower your risk or take control of your diabetes, they include:

  • Getting adequate amounts of fiber in your diet
  • Becoming more physically active
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Maintaining a well-balanced diet
  • Managing blood pressure levels
  • Keeping your cholesterol at a normal level
  • Taking medications as prescribed

According to the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes Alert Day serves as a one- day “wakeup call”.  Use this day as a reminder to speak with your physician about your risk factors and steps you can take to stay healthy.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Today is World TB Day – Learn the Facts About Tuberculosis

March 24th has been designated TBglobally as “World TB Day”. The event began in 1982 is sponsored by the World Health Organization and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and is intended to raise awareness that anyone can contract TB to make health professionals aware of the importance of testing people for the disease.

This date was chosen to celebrate  the discovery by Dr. Robert Koch of the Mycobacterium tuberculoisis (the bacteria that causes tuberculosis) in 1882. This important discovery was the beginning of the steps being taken to control and hopefully one day eradicate the disease. Unfortunately, TB is still one of the leading causes of death around the world.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease that affects mainly the lungs but can also affect the kidneys, brain and the spine.  Signs and symptoms may include:
• Coughing up blood
• Fatigue
• Fever
• Chills
• Night sweats
• Loss of appetite
• Pain with breathing

TB is spread by coming into contact with the airborne droplets  of the bacteria from an infected person. People most susceptible are those who have compromised immune systems and  include people undergoing chemotherapy, have diabetes, are very young or very old, and have HIV/AIDS. There are antibiotics that given to fight the disease but depending on the strain and their resistance to treatment, may require months or years of treatment.

A routine physical usually includes a TB skin test. If you would like to schedule a physical exam and a TB test with one of our physicians, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bladder Stones

Bladder stones are tiny accumulations of mineral crystals that can form stones over time when the bladder isn’t completely emptied. Sometimes these stones go unnoticed and are eventually passed out of the body, but at other times they may be too large or blocked from leaving the bladder and can cause symptoms.
Symptoms of bladder stones include:
• Painful urination
• Blood in the urine
• Lower abdominal pain
• Incomplete urination
• Dark or cloudy urine
Bladder stones are diagnosed by taking a thorough history from the patient and performing a urine exam to check for blood and the presence of minerals. Additionally it may be necessary to perform a cystoscope which is the insertion of a tiny camera through the urethra to examine the bladder, and a CT scan or ultrasound exam which determine if  stones if they are present in the bladder.
While some bladder stones may pass on their own, they usually require some sort of intervention to aid the process. One procedure is called a cystolitholapaxy which involves the use of a cystoscope inserted through the urethra into the bladder and then breaking the stones apart with ultrasound, laser, or by mechanical means. If the stones are very large, surgical intervention may be necessary.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.