Do Detox Teas Do More Harm Than Good?

Dieting is never easy, nor is there a “quick fix” for weight loss on the market that comes without some risk.

The latest trend seems to be detox teas.  The active ingredient in most of the teas is caffeine.  Caffeine can produce side effects such as nervousness, stomach irritation, nausea, vomiting, anxiety and agitation, headache, ringing in the ears as well as increased heart and breathing rates.

As an appetite suppressant, products containing caffeine may work for the short term. Often times detox teas that combine caffeine with a diuretic that may trigger a false sense of weight loss since diuretics cause a loss of water weight, not actual body fat.

Additionally, the caffeine in the teas may cause you to have insomnia.  Studies have shown that a lack of sleep can trigger excessive eating and even slow your metabolism causing you to gain weight.

Nutritionists and healthcare professionals agree that there is no magic formula to weight loss.  The best way to plan for weight loss is to start with a visit to your doctor, make healthy food choices, implement portion control when eating and start a light exercise regimen slowly building as your endurance increases.  The formula for keeping the weight off is to retrain your brain so that you can maintain your new healthier lifestyle.

If you are thinking about taking off a few pounds and would like to speak with a health care professional at Flushing Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Eileen Flores  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Eileen:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:   I started as a student at Flushing’s nursing school in 1976. I graduated as an RN in 1979 and have worked here since.

Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: The name of the department I work in is PACU. I worked in PACU since 1988. My present position is Assistant Head Nurse.

Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  I decided to become a nurse when my youngest brother was admitted to the hospital. I saw the care he was given and how it made a difference. I wanted to be able to do the same.

QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Working in a place that treats everyone like family.  I have taken care of so many people during my time at Flushing Hospital.  We have seen many children grow up and have families of their own, which we also take care of. I take pride in our sense of community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Esophageal Cancer

esophageal cancer Esophageal cancer is a disease that develops when cancer forms in the esophagus- the long, hollow, muscular tube that runs from your throat to your stomach.   The esophagus helps to move food and liquids to your stomach after you swallow.

Cancer of the esophagus is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. It occurs more often in men than in women.

Although the cause for esophageal cancer is unclear, research indicates that the disease may develop as a result of damaged DNA in the cells that line the esophagus.  It is also believed that chronic irritation to the esophagus is a contributing factor.   Other factors that may increase the risk of developing the disease include:

  • Being obese
  • Having GERD
  • Having Barrett’s esophagus( A serious complication of GERD)
  • Having bile reflux
  • Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Undergoing radiation treatments to the chest or upper abdomen

Esophageal cancer may not have symptoms in its early stages.  However, as the disease progresses the following symptoms may occur:

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Chronic cough
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Indigestion and heartburn

Cancer of the esophagus can be diagnosed by performing a series of tests and procedures that include genomic testing, imaging scans, endoscopy or biopsy. If it is found that you have developed esophageal cancer, your doctor may request further testing to determine the stage of cancer.

Treatment for esophageal cancer is based on stage, overall health and your preferences for care. Immunotherapy, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy or interventional radiology are some of the approaches that your doctor may discuss with you.

If you are experiencing symptoms of esophageal cancer, please call Flushing Hospital Medical Center at 718-670-5486 to make an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is it Okay to Request a Second Opinion From Your Doctor?

Receiving news that you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a serious or rare medical condition can be very overwhelming and scary. While it is important to listen to and follow your doctor’s instructions, it is also appropriate in these situations to seek the advice of other professionals and request a second opinion.

Unfortunately, less than half of the people diagnosed with a serious or life-threatening disease request a second opinion. The most frequent reasons individuals cited for not doing so include: feeling an urgency to seek treatment right away, lack of access to experts or centers of excellence, fear that their insurance carrier would not cover the cost, and concerns about offending their doctor.

In most cases, these reasons are unmerited; in reality, many conditions do not require immediate treatment and most physicians welcome a second opinion. In addition, many insurance providers allow for second opinions and can even help identify local experts that participate in your plan.

So, when is getting a second opinion a good idea? According to WebMD, the following circumstances are appropriate:

  • Where the treatment is very risky or toxic
  • Where the diagnosis is not clear, the treatment is experimental, or there is no established consensus or Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment
  • If you’re considering participating in a trial for a new drug
  • If you’re considering some new experimental approach or a procedure that involves using experimental instruments or devices.

In many cases, second opinions are very beneficial.  In fact, a recent study highlighted their potential value.  Researchers found  that as many as 88% of those who sought a second opinion for a complex medical condition had a new diagnosis that changed their treatment plan, and 21% received a completely different diagnosis.

If you would like to seek a second opinion, but are unsure of how to start the conversation with your doctor, try some of these tips.

  • Tell your doctor you want to be sure that you explore all your treatment options. This may include looking into several surgical and non-surgical interventions.
  • Let your doctor know that you always talk to more than one expert when you need to make an important decision, whether it’s a medical, financial, or personal decision.
  • Explain to your doctor that a second opinion would give you peace of mind that your diagnosis and treatment plan are the best option for you.

Even if a second opinion doesn’t change your diagnosis or treatment plan, you can feel satisfied that you made a well-informed decision.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight

The Flushing Hospital Medical Center Department (FHMC) Spotlight shines on the Department of Materials Management/Supply Chain.

This group of professionals, led by Director Robert Arbitello, is responsible for the supervision of purchasing decisions with a focus on ensuring their medical facility is properly stocked with the right products and equipment.

They are further tasked with the planning procurement, storage, control and distribution of materials and products throughout the hospital.

For their excellent work FHMC recognizes and congratulates the Department of Materials Management/Supply Chain on being chosen as the Department Spotlight for the month of May!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

April’s Employee Spotlight Shines on Jayne Koerber!

April’s Employee Spotlight shines on Jayne Koerber, clerk and medical transcriber for the Department of Radiology at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC).  She has been a valued employee at FHMC for the past 32 years.

On any given day, you will find Jayne answering phones, scheduling patient appointments, verifying insurance eligibility and forwarding radiologic reports to the necessary departments.

Jayne Koerber greets every day with a smile.  She states that the part of her job that is most rewarding is, “Helping patients in our hospital and our community; always treating them with respect and compassion.”

She loves her work at FHMC, although it can be challenging because, “You must be able to multi-task.  The phones are always ringing, patients are coming in for registration and insurance companies call for authorizations all simultaneously.”

Jayne resides with her husband Al.  She has two daughters, Elizabeth and Kristina.  She loves to take long walks, cook and shop.  Some of her other non-work related hobbies are working with charities such as The Lupus Foundation, St. Jude’s Hospital Pemphigus Foundation and the Lustgarten Foundation.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center congratulates Jayne Koerber for receiving April’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Free Core Strengthening and Circulation Classes At Flushing Hospital

In an effort to improve the overall wellness of our surrounding community and employees, Flushing Hospital Medical Center has partnered with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation’s, Shape Up NYC, to offer free core strengthening and circulation classes to everyone.

Leading the class is Jordan, a trained specialist in fitness who knows how to make exercise enjoyable for everyone.

According to Shape Up NYC, “this class includes core strengthening and circulation techniques to improve balance and improve intestinal health, dynamic and static stretching, calisthenics and plyometric bodyweight strengthening, Cardiovascular exercises, core-focused breathing postures to slow the mind and for a stronger body, and meditation.”

Class began on March 5th and will take place every Tuesday at 5:00 pm at the 5th Fl. Auditorium/Conference Room A, corner of 45th Avenue and Burling Street.

You can sign up at the time of attendance and please bring your own mat.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Danica Santos  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Danica:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working at Flushing Hospital for 4 years since 2015.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Medsurg 2 North 2
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  My mother and grandmother are nurses. I grew up with a family in the medical field. I just knew that that would be my career from the start. I always wanted to help people. I wanted to care for them, reassure them, and heal them to their best condition. I wanted to learn from and interact with people from different kinds of backgrounds.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The people I work with and the patients and families I help. Without a great team, I wouldn’t be here. We always have each other’s back. When helping patients and their families, I want to make them as comfortable as possible when they’re in the hospital. They may seem lost, scared, maybe even separated from their family. You never know their life story. But receiving a simple thank you with a big smile on their face is the best feeling in the world.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding and Returning to Work

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding and working is a challenge you can overcome.

Here are some suggestions designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier:

1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.

2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.

3. Ask if your company provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.

4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care department at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – FHMC SECURITY DEPARTMENT

April’s Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Department Spotlight shines on the Security Department.

Under the leadership of Carmen Altieri, Director, the FHMC security force is tasked with securing the hospital premises, protecting its personnel, patients, and visitors, as well as monitoring the hospital’s closed circuit TV (CCTV), and checking that the proper hospital identification is being displayed on each employee.

“The department creates an environment of safety at FHMC and we are proud of the work we do.”  stated Ms. Altieri.

Congratulations of being April’s Department Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.