What you should know about Type 1 (T1D) Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise and what has significantly increased is the rate of type 1 diabetes (T1D), formerly known as “juvenile” or “juvenile onset” diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that more than 13,000 children and young people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.

T1D is often first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. However, people may develop T1D at any age. The exact cause of T1D is unknown, there is no cure and it cannot be outgrown. In most cases of T1D, the body’s own immune system, which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses, mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Doctors believe genetics may play a role in this process, and exposure to certain environmental factors, such as viruses, may trigger the disease.

Symptoms for T1D include:
• Increased thirst
• Frequent urination
• Bedwetting in children who previously didn’t wet the bed during the night
• Extreme hunger
• Unintended weight loss
• Irritability and other mood changes
• Fatigue and weakness
• Blurred vision
• In females, frequent vaginal yeast infections

The good news is that it can be controlled with insulin therapy, exercise and diet. A simple blood test can identify type 1 diabetes. Be sure to consult with a physician if you or a family member is experiencing any of the above symptoms by contacting Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Celebrates Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day

Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) joins the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in celebrating National Dietitian Nutritionist Day, today, Wednesday, March 13th.  As the nation’s food and nutrition experts, registered dietitian nutritionists are committed  to improving the health of their patients, clients and communities.  We applaud their great work!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month

Problem gambling is a serious issue that affects millions of people in the United States. An estimated two million people can be classified as having a gambling addiction and an additional four to six million people can be said to have a problem with gambling. Uncontrolled gambling can ruin families, finances, and careers.

The National Council on Problem Gambling began a campaign 16 years ago in order to raise awareness and to suggest ways that these people can be helped. There are three main goals of this campaign:

  • Increase public awareness of problem gambling
  • Increase awareness of the resources to aid with problem gambling
  • Encourage medical providers to screen for gambling problems

Some of the criteria for defining problem gambling include:

  • Patterns that compromise, disrupt or damage family or work
  • Preoccupation with gambling and the need to bet money
  • Restlessness or becoming irritable when attempting to quit
  • Continuing to chase the big payoff

Compulsive gambling can be described as having the same effect on certain people as using drugs or alcohol. They build up a tolerance to it and are always in need of more in order to satisfy their urges.

A person who feels that they have a gambling issue should contact their physician to see about getting help. You can also go to the website of Gamblers Anonymous http://www.gamblersanonymous.org/ga/ for referrals in your community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Endometriosis Awareness Month

Endometriosis Awareness takes the spotlight during the month of March with a mission to raise awareness about the disease which currently affects an estimated 176 million women around the globe.

Endometriosis occurs when the tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus- grows outside the uterus. This abnormal growth of tissue can commonly be found on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, ligaments that support the uterus, as well as areas between the rectum and vagina.  Areas where endometriosis is less commonly found are the lungs, thighs, arms and other areas beyond the reproductive organs or lower abdomen.

Endometrial tissue develops into growths or clumps called implants.  These clusters of tissue respond to the menstrual cycle the same as they would inside the uterus.  Meaning, each month the tissue builds up, breaks down then sheds.  Unlike the tissue that lines the inside of the uterus; endometrial tissue cannot be discharged from the body through vaginal bleeding.  This results in inflammation, swelling, the formation of scar tissue or internal bleeding.

The symptoms of endometriosis typically present themselves during reproductive years- on average between the ages of 12 to 60 years old.  Symptoms include:

  • Painful sexual intercourse
  • Pain during pelvic examinations
  • Severe pain during menstruation
  • Pain during urination or a bowel movement
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Infertility

The cause of endometriosis is unknown but several factors such as genetics, retrograde period flow, immune system disorders and hormones are being researched.

Most cases are diagnosed in women between the ages of 25 to 35 years of age; however, some women with endometriosis remain undiagnosed because they do not have symptoms and the disorder is sometimes mistaken for other conditions.

Women who do experience symptoms should speak with their doctor about receiving tests such as pelvic examinations, laparoscopy and imaging tests, to find out if they  have endometriosis.

Although there is no cure for endometriosis, effective treatments including medication, surgery and alternative therapies are available.

If you are experiencing the symptoms it is recommended that you make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible. If you would like to make an appointment with a gynecologist, please call 718-670-8994.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Medicinal Benefits of Cinnamon

Most people think of cinnamon as a spice that adds flavor to food and beverages. What many people don’t know however is that for thousands of years people have been using cinnamon for medicinal purposes.

Cinnamon is obtained from the inner bark of cinnamon trees. The bark is then crushed into a powder which we can use as a flavoring or for medicinal purposes.

Some of the known medicinal benefits of cinnamon are:
• Acts as an anti-inflammatory
• Lowers blood sugar
• Acts as an anti-oxidant
• Acts as an anti-microbial
• Helps manage symptoms of Alzheimer’s
• Helps manage symptoms of Parkinson’s
• Thought to have anti-carcinogenic properties
• Helps manage polycystic ovarian syndrome
• Help manage dry eye and conjunctivitis
• Can be used as an insect repellant

Though cinnamon usually has no side effects, too much can irritate the mouth and the lips. Some people may also be allergic to it. As with anything, speak to you your physician before using cinnamon to treat any medical condition.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Wound Care and Nutrition

 

Please, help me fasterThe nutritional status of a patient plays a large role in their body’s ability undergo wound healing.  It requires a higher than normal level of energy and nutrients if it is going to be successful. The body requires an additional 35 calories per kilogram of body weight to help a chronic wound to heal.  This will include eating a well-balanced diet that includes protein, grains, fruits, vegetables, and dairy.

For proper wound healing, a well-balanced diet should include 1.5 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight. A kilogram is equal to 2.2 pounds. Keeping hydrated is also very important, eight glasses of water per day should be the minimum and more if the person sweats profusely, has a wound that is draining, or if vomiting and or diarrhea are present.  Meals should include meats, eggs, milk, cheese, nuts, seeds, yogurt and dried beans. In some people who have difficulty obtaining proper caloric intake from their daily meals, high protein and high calorie shakes can be used as supplements. Two amino acids, found in foods having protein and that have been identified as having potential to help wound healing are arginine and glutamine.

People with diabetes often have difficulty with wound healing, and this is due to poor circulation, nerve damage which leads to the constant breakdown of healthy tissue components needed to heal,  and a higher than normal level of sugar in the blood which can lead to higher rates of infection and causes fluids to be drained from the body. It is therefore very important for a person with diabetes to keep tight control of their disease.
Wound healing also requires additional levels of vitamins and minerals, however care must be taken too not take in more that the daily recommended amounts because this can have a negative effect on the body.

It is important to consult with a physician about how to eat successfully when trying to heal a wound and also a nutritionist who specializes in wound care.

If you have a chronic or non-healing wound, you may be a candidate for Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s  outpatient Wound Care Center.  To schedule an appointment or speak with a clinician, please call 718-670-4542

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) February Employee Spotlight shines on Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt, ER, RN, Case Manager.  Carmen has been an employee at FHMC for 30 years serving as a Case Manager, Registered Nurse and Pediatrics ICU Nurse.

Denise James, Director of the Case Management and Social Work Department, describes Carmen as a “Dedicated, hardworking individual who goes above and beyond the call of duty.  She is trustworthy, knowledgeable and shares her knowledge with her fellow case managers. To say that Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt exceeds the expectations of employees at FHMC’s Case Management and Social Work Department would be an understatement.”

Since Carmen is assigned to the Emergency Room, as part of her duties, she provides guidance to the healthcare team on meeting criteria for inpatient hospital stays and coordinating safe discharge plans.  She also assists with post hospital-care in addition to providing social support to the patients and families.

As a Case Manager, it is difficult for Carmen to see patients that require further aftercare and cannot afford it or are uninsured.  It is during those times that Carmen rises to the occasion and addresses any challenge she is dealing with.  Her main concern is making the appropriate decision for anyone entrusted in her care.  She is committed to making the best out of any situation.

When not at work Carmen enjoys spending time with her husband of 32 years and her 2 children.  She is very active in her church, loves meeting and talking with people and watching TV, especially romantic movies.

“I don’t believe in complaining as my dad always taught and reminded me how blessed I am.”  These are words that Carmen lives by.

Congratulations Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt on being February’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Valentine’s Day at Flushing Hospital Medical Center

For Valentine’s Day this year the Food and Nutrition Department handed out Valentine’s Day Teddy Bears to patients throughout the hospital.  The patient’s were delighted by their Valentine’s Day surprise.   The Food and Nutrition Department set out to prove that you can share some Valentines’ Day sweetness without the chocolate!   We hope everyone enjoyed the holiday!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Elizabeth Sun, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month,

Meet Elizabeth:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I have been working at Flushing Hospital for seven years since 2011.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Perinatal
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A: After working in the family business for a while, I wanted a career for myself. I enjoy working with people and helping them so the obvious choice was to become a nurse. Nursing also appealed to me due to the diverse fields it encompassed.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Caring for my patients,  and I really enjoy meeting and conversing with different people. Every day I encounter different folks with different backgrounds and opinions. I have learned a lot at FHMC, not only about nursing but also about people.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Much You Can Save by Quitting Smoking

Quitting smoking enriches your life in several ways. One of the major benefits of quitting is improving your health; another great benefit is saving money.

On average, a pack of cigarettes in New York costs $13. While this may not seem like a lot, it does add up and can become expensive.  Quitting can help you to save and apply your money towards other items or goals.  Here is an example of how much you can potentially save over time and a few ideas of how you could spend the extra money.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The journey to quit smoking can be difficult but you do not have to do it alone. Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s smoking cessation team wants to help you to develop a plan leading to your “quit day”. The hospital has partnered with the American Lung Association to bring you Freedom from Smoking, a comprehensive and successful group-based smoking cessation program. Learn how to overcome your addiction to tobacco and enjoy the benefits of better health in a fun and interactive environment. Receive personalized attention as well as the support from group members who are experiencing this journey with you. For more information, please call 718 206 8494.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.