Free Core Strengthening and Circulation Classes At Flushing Hospital

In an effort to improve the overall wellness of our surrounding community and employees, Flushing Hospital Medical Center has partnered with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation’s, Shape Up NYC, to offer free core strengthening and circulation classes to everyone.

Leading the class is Jordan, a trained specialist in fitness who knows how to make exercise enjoyable for everyone.

According to Shape Up NYC, “this class includes core strengthening and circulation techniques to improve balance and improve intestinal health, dynamic and static stretching, calisthenics and plyometric bodyweight strengthening, Cardiovascular exercises, core-focused breathing postures to slow the mind and for a stronger body, and meditation.”

Class began on March 5th and will take place every Tuesday at 5:00 pm at the 5th Fl. Auditorium/Conference Room A, corner of 45th Avenue and Burling Street.

You can sign up at the time of attendance and please bring your own mat.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Danica Santos  RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month.

Meet Danica:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A:  I have been working at Flushing Hospital for 4 years since 2015.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Medsurg 2 North 2
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  My mother and grandmother are nurses. I grew up with a family in the medical field. I just knew that that would be my career from the start. I always wanted to help people. I wanted to care for them, reassure them, and heal them to their best condition. I wanted to learn from and interact with people from different kinds of backgrounds.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  The people I work with and the patients and families I help. Without a great team, I wouldn’t be here. We always have each other’s back. When helping patients and their families, I want to make them as comfortable as possible when they’re in the hospital. They may seem lost, scared, maybe even separated from their family. You never know their life story. But receiving a simple thank you with a big smile on their face is the best feeling in the world.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Adrienne Diaz, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month,

Meet Adrienne:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I have been working at Flushing for 4 years since 2014.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: I work in the Med-Surg unit 4N1.
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A: Growing up in a community that lacked healthcare resources and had a language barrier I always knew I wanted to contribute and give back to my community. As a nurse at Flushing Hospital, which is so diverse and part of the community I grew up in, I am able to fulfill that goal of giving back.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A: The best part of my job is being able to impact someone’s life in a positive way even by a small gesture such as, when a patient tells me how happy they are that I am their nurse for the day or a simple thank you from a patient when I’m having a stressful day.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating  Elizabeth Sun, RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month,

Meet Elizabeth:

Q&A:

Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I have been working at Flushing Hospital for seven years since 2011.
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: Perinatal
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A: After working in the family business for a while, I wanted a career for myself. I enjoy working with people and helping them so the obvious choice was to become a nurse. Nursing also appealed to me due to the diverse fields it encompassed.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A:  Caring for my patients,  and I really enjoy meeting and conversing with different people. Every day I encounter different folks with different backgrounds and opinions. I have learned a lot at FHMC, not only about nursing but also about people.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fainting

Whether watching a scene in a movie or on a television show or witnessing it happen in person, we have all seen someone faint, but do we really know what it is or what causes someone to do it?

Fainting, also called syncope (pronounced SIN-ko-pee), is a sudden, brief loss of consciousness and posture caused by decreased blood flow to the brain.

There are many different conditions that can cause someone to faint, including having an irregular heartbeat or low blood sugar. It can also be due to a condition called anemia, which is a deficiency in healthy oxygen-carrying cells or problems with the nervous system.  Anxiety, stress, hunger, dehydration or the use of alcohol or drugs can all lead to a fainting spell. In some cases, fainting runs in families.

While fainting may indicate a particular medical condition, sometimes it may occur in an otherwise healthy individual. In fact, most people who faint have no underlying heart or neurological problem. A simple fainting episode also called a vasovagal attack, is the most common type of fainting spell and is most common in children and young adults.

Typically, before someone faints, they will begin to feel a rush of warmth through their body, followed by a sensation of weakness or lightheadedness before going limp and passing out. The person may also break out in a cold sweat or experience nausea. In most cases, the individual who has fainted regains complete consciousness within just a few minutes.

Management of fainting is simple: Allow the person to recover while lying flat and elevate their legs to allow blood to flow to the brain. Drinking fruit juice after regaining consciousness can also be helpful, especially if the episode was due to low blood sugar.  If the patient doesn’t regain consciousness quickly, dial 911.

See a health care provider immediately if a person fainted hit their head, if they have fainted more than once in a month; if they are experiencing unusual symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, blurred vision or difficulty speaking; or if they are pregnant or have another serious condition. A doctor can help determine the cause and possibly address the underlying issue.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital Medical Center,  please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Nurse of The Month

Our nurses are the pillars of our community. In addition to meeting the demands of being a caregiver, they wear several hats including that of an educator, nurturer,  and comforter.

Not only to do nurses care for patients; they provide support to families and loved ones during difficult times.

Our nurses pour their hearts into all aspects of their job, and this is one of the many reasons why we celebrate their accomplishments.

Join us in congratulating Johanna Pinzon RN for receiving Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Nurse of the Month,

Meet Johanna:

Q&A:
Q: How long have you been working for FHMC?
A: I have been working at Flushing Hospital for five years
Q: On which unit do you currently work?
A: 3 North 1
Q: Why did you want to become a nurse?
A:  I truly wanted to help people. Working at a job that allows me to help others brings me great satisfaction. You need to be happy with your work and helping others makes me happy.
QWhat is the best part of your job?
A: I love working with the geriatric population at our hospital. Often times, the geriatric patient has survived their relatives or their children are elderly and unable to come to see them as often as they’d like. That’s when I become their family. I check in with the patient, not only to meet their medical needs but to be sure that they know there is someone close by to talk to or bring them something from outside the hospital that will make them more comfortable such as a magazine or book. I like to think of myself as an extended family to all the patients I care for.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Every year the month of November is recognized nationally as Diabetes Awareness Month. According to the American Diabetes Association, 25.8 million people have this disease, however, only 18.8 million have been diagnosed. An additional 79 million people in the United States are believed to have pre-diabetes.

Diabetes affects different race and ethnic groups more frequently than others. The prevalence of diabetes has been calculated to affect 7.1 % of Caucasians, 8.4% of Asian Americans, 12.6% of African Americans and 11.8 % of Hispanics. Diabetes is considered a chronic illness that leads to it being a cause of death, either directly or through a complication due to the disease. Some of the complications associated with diabetes are hypertension, blindness, heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, neuropathy, and amputations.

Diabetes is a chronic illness for which there is no known cure. It can, however, be treated successfully in many people, and very often these people lead long and healthy lives. Having a family history of diabetes can be a risk factor for developing the disease but not a guarantee that a person will definitely develop it. Other risk factors include obesity, poor diet, having diabetes during pregnancy, race and ethnicity, being over the age of 45, lack of exercise, and having high blood pressure.

Some of the symptoms of diabetes are frequent urination, frequently feeling thirsty, blurry vision, fatigue, feeling hungry even after having just eaten a meal or a snack, wounds that are slow to heal, numbness or tingling in the extremities, and in some cases, weight loss.

The three most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 which indicates a lack of insulin production by the pancreas, Type 1 is most commonly associated with children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes is when the body produces insulin but it is not utilized adequately by the body, also known as adult-onset diabetes and the most commonly diagnosed form of the disease. Gestational Diabetes occurs occasionally during pregnancy and then frequently resolves itself once the pregnancy is completed.

Diabetes is diagnosed through blood tests. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, a physician will discuss treatment options that will work for that individual. Often this will include either an oral medication in cases that are less severe or insulin injections for more serious cases, combined with diet modification and possibly an exercise regime. It is extremely important to keep diabetes well controlled. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications that may be irreversible and can lead to blindness, heart disease, stroke and premature death.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Bariatric Surgery Right For You?

Obesity is a growing public health issue in our region.  According to NYC.gov, more than half of New Yorkers are overweight, and nearly a quarter qualify as obese.  The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, reports that an estimated 23% of the population living in Queens is obese.

These rates are concerning because people who are obese are at an increased risk for developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, stroke, hypertension, heart disease and some cancers.  However, the good news is the risks associated with many of these conditions can be significantly reduced by losing weight.

Diet and exercise are highly recommended methods of weight loss but they may not be enough to yield significant results for those who are obese.   Bariatric surgery offers an extremely effective weight loss solution for people who have tried and failed to lose weight by way of diet and exercise. Additionally, it has been shown to help improve several obesity-related health conditions.

The two most popular bariatric surgeries are the sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass procedures. In the sleeve gastrectomy operation, a large portion of the stomach is removed and a smaller, new stomach in the shape of a tube or “sleeve” is created.  During bypass surgery, a new small stomach pouch is created, and a section of the small bowel is bypassed. These surgeries are usually done through small incisions either laparoscopically or using the da Vinci surgical robot, ensuring a minimally invasive approach. Both surgeries offer excellent long-term results and positive outcomes in most patients.

With this is in mind, it is important to understand that bariatric surgery is a major operation, no matter which procedure is chosen.  Bariatric surgery is not an easy way out. It is an important decision to be made under strict physician supervision and with the support of loved ones.  The process is immersive and takes approximately 4-5 months of supervised dieting and being seen by multiple specialties for approval.

Although bariatric surgery is considered safe, it is very important that patients understand the risks of surgery. As with most major surgical procedures, the risks can include bleeding or other complications.

For those who would like to explore non-surgical weight loss procedures, there are options such as the FDA-approved Obalon Balloon System. This involves three air filled balloons inserted via a swallowed capsule. The patient is given no anesthesia and most people return to work the same day. The balloons stay in for six months after which they are removed via endoscopy. The procedure is generally very well tolerated with some side effects such as nausea and cramping. Studies have shown weight loss to continue beyond removal and many patients lose a significant amount of weight.

When deciding which procedure is best for you, it is recommended that you receive an expert consultation with a surgeon. Your physician can assess your health which can lead to the decision on which surgery is suitable for your needs.

To ensure the highest quality care and maximize your chances of a successful weight loss procedure, it is recommended that you receive treatment at a “Bariatric Center of Excellence”, such as Flushing Hospital Medical Center.

Flushing Hospital is the only Center of Excellence in Queens. The process to reach this designation is arduous and ensures that the center and the surgeons are of the highest quality and preparedness. Surgical outcomes are measured very strictly and the capability of both the surgeons and the center must be of the highest caliber when compared nationally.

To make an appointment, please call 718-408-6977.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Stuttering

Stuttering, sometimes called stammering or dysfluency is a disruption in the normal patterns of speech. It can take many forms, such as:

Message on chalkboard

• Repeating a sound or a syllable, especially at the beginning of the word, such as “li- li- like.”
• Prolongation of a sound such as “ssssss”
• Complete stoppage of speech or the omission of a sound.
• Repeated interruption of speech with sounds such as “uh” or “um.”

Stuttering can begin at any age, but it’s most common among children who are learning to form words into sentences. Boys are more likely than girls to stutter.

Approximately one out of every 20 children will develop stuttering that lasts for more than six months, but this does not necessarily mean that stuttering is going to be a lifelong problem. Knowing what to look for and responding appropriately to your child’s stuttering will go a long way toward preventing it from becoming a more long-term or even permanent condition.

Why does stuttering begin? At one time many people thought that stuttering was the result of either physical or emotional trauma. While there are rare instances of stuttering following traumatic events, this is not the typical factor when determining why stuttering begins. Instead, experts point to other factors that contribute to stuttering:

• Family History – According to research, 60% of all stutterers have someone in the family who also stutters.
• Child Development. – Children who have other language and speech problems are more likely to stutter than children who don’t.
• Neurophysiology – Which part of the brain processes language can contribute in identifying why some children stutter
• Family Dynamics – Some children’s stuttering has been attributed to high family expectations and a fast-paced lifestyle.

Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about your child’s stuttering. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist known as a speech-language pathologist (SLP) who can evaluate your child and determine whether or not there is a risk of a long-term problem. In most cases, treatment primarily focuses on training and working with the parents to develop techniques to help the child cope with and get beyond his or her stuttering.

Parents of children who stutter can also help by creating a relaxing atmosphere at home that encourages speech, even if a stutter is present. Some tips include:

• Create opportunities for talking that are relaxed, fun, and enjoyable.
• When conversing with your child, try to create an environment with limiting distractions, such as the presence of television.
• Don’t be critical of your child’s speech or insist on precise or correct speech. Don’t correct his speech, or complete his sentences.
• Don’t put pressure on your child to verbally interact with others when stuttering becomes a problem.
• Listen attentively to what your child is saying, maintaining normal eye contact without displaying signs of impatience or frustration.
• Model a slow, relaxed way of speaking to help your child slow down his own speech.
• Don’t be afraid to talk with your child about stuttering and answer questions. Explain that disruptions in speech are common.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn More About Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive condition that affects the nervous system and movement.

The disease occurs when nerve cells (or neurons) in the brain gradually break down or die. These neurons produce a chemical messenger in the brain called dopamine. When dopamine levels decrease, it leads to abnormal activity in the brain.

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease vary from person to person with early signs often going unnoticed before they begin to progress.  Symptoms often start on one side of the body and usually remain worse on that side, even after symptoms begin to affect both sides.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can include:

  • Tremors. Shaking that begins in a limb, often your hand or fingers.  Your hand may tremor when it’s at rest.
  • Slowed movement. Over time, Parkinson’s disease may make simple tasks difficult and time-consuming. Your steps may become shorter or you may drag your feet.
  • Rigid muscles. Muscle stiffness may occur in any part of your body. The stiff muscles can be painful and limit your range of motion.
  • Impaired posture and balance. Your posture may become stooped, or you may have difficulty balancing.
  • Loss of automatic movements. You may have a decreased ability to perform unconscious movements, including blinking, smiling or swinging your arms when you walk.
  • Speech changes. You may speak softly, quickly, slur or hesitate before talking.  Speech may also become monotone.
  • Writing changes. It may become hard to write, and your writing may appear small.

Parkinson’s disease can also lead to other complications, including difficulty remembering or concentrating, emotional changes and depression, difficulty chewing and swallowing, sleep disorders and fatigue, constipation, and bladder control issues.

The most common risk factors for Parkinson’s disease are:

  • Age. People usually develop the disease around age 60 or older.
  • Heredity. Having a close relative with Parkinson’s increases the chances that you’ll develop the disease.
  • Gender. Men are more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than are women.
  • Exposure to toxins. Ongoing exposure to herbicides and pesticides may slightly increase your risk of Parkinson’s disease.

Because the cause of Parkinson’s is unknown, proven ways to prevent the disease also remain a mystery. Some research has shown that regular aerobic exercise might reduce the risk of Parkinson’s disease.

While there is still no cure for Parkinson’s disease, there are treatments that can slow down the progression and alleviate the symptoms of the condition. Most treatments involve the use of medications that increase the production of dopamine in the brain. Unfortunately, the effects of these drugs usually wear off over time. There are also surgical options designed to stimulate brain function. This type of procedure has led to dramatic improvements in many patients with Parkinson’s disease.

If you or someone you love is experiencing symptoms or Parkinson’s disease, see your doctor. If you do not have a doctor, you can make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.