Diabetes and Depression

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Diabetes does not directly cause depression but can contribute to it indirectly for a variety of reasons. Managing diabetes can be very stressful and it does require a modification of eating habits and, to some degree, a modification of lifestyle. Many people have difficulty keeping their blood sugar under control and this can also lead to frustration and potentially be a cause of depression.
Signs of depression include:
• Change in appetite
• Change in sleep pattern
• Loss of interest in doing things that were once enjoyable
• Trouble concentrating
• Lack of energy
• Feeling suicidal
If diabetes is not well controlled then variations in blood sugar level, high or low, can lead to symptoms that are similar to depression.
Similarly, depression can lead to the onset of diabetes. When people are depressed their eating habits tend to be affected and many people will over eat to the point of becoming obese. Some people who are depressed have no desire to be physically active, and many will also smoke. All of these are risk factors for diabetes.
There are ways to manage both diabetes and depression simultaneously. The most important factor is to speak with a physician who has experience and can help you to gain control of these illnesses. A patient who has been diagnosed with diabetes might also benefit from a program that focuses on behavior modification that will lead to a healthier lifestyle. There are medications that can be prescribed which will be helpful in managing these illnesses. Seeking the help of a psychotherapist will also be helpful in gaining confidence in the ability to manage both diseases.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital to discuss diabetes management please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The History of Hearing Aids

For hundreds of years devices have been used to help the hearing impaired. As early as the 1600s devices were made from sea shells, animal horns and then, in later years,  from brass and copper. These early hearing instruments that were wide at one end to gather the sound and narrow at the other end to direct sound  into the ear canal. They were described as ear trumpets because of the way they looked.
In the 1700s it was discovered that sound could be sensed as vibrations on bony surfaces of the skull so devices were placed behind the ear to help  transmit these sounds.
In the 1800s devices were created that resembled tubes into which a person spoke at one end and the other end was placed in the ear of the person who was listening.
In the early part of the 20th century devices were developed that began to use electricity. This helped tremendously with the development of hearing devices that could amplify sounds and direct them into people’s ears. Some of the technology used by Alexander Graham Bell for the telephone was also used for these hearing aids.  Sounds were amplified by using a carbon microphone and powered by batteries.
Over the years, batteries became smaller and transistors were developed that helped to miniaturize the devices,  which improved helped sound quality.
The digital era has improved hearing aids even further both in quality of the sound and the size of the device. Hearing aids are now being used that fit in the ear canal and aren’t easily visible, making people less hesitant to wear them.  While years ago hearing aids were used mainly by people who were hard of hearing, now they can be used for people who just need a little help to hear more clearly.
If you or someone you know is experiencing difficulty hearing, it is recommended that you speak with a physician who will make a referral to our audiology evaluation department.  Please call 718-670-5486

for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Men’s Health Month

The month of June has been recognized as Men’s Health Month. The reason for this designation is to bring awareness of preventable health issues and to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases prevalent in men.
The leading causes of death among men are:
• Heart Disease
• Cancer
• Diabetes
• Lung Disease
• Injuries
• Stroke
• HIV/AIDS
Some of the reasons that men tend to have more serious chronic illnesses is because more men than women don’t have health insurance, men tend to have more physically demanding jobs with greater safety risks. Additionally  more men smoke than women and they also tend to  take greater risks with unsafe behavior.
Women tend to live five years longer than men and one of the reasons for this is that women usually take better care of their health. Men are often guilty of waiting until a disease has progressed to a more serious level before they seek help. There is an old adage that if a man is in a doctor’s waiting room, most likely a woman brought him there for an exam.
During the month of June, organizations across the country hold health awareness campaigns to educate men about various health issues that they may be at risk for and to encourage them to see a doctor regularly. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World No Tobacco Day

Since 1987 the World Health Organization has recognized May 31st as a day to bring awareness around the world of the harmful effects of tobacco. This year the focus is on tobacco and cardiovascular diseases.
The risks of using tobacco are well documented, however many people around the world are not fully aware of the dangers.  There is a very strong link between tobacco use and heart disease, circulatory problems and stroke.
Coronary vascular diseases are one of the world’s leading causes of death.  Tobacco use is the second leading cause of these types of diseases, hypertension being the leading cause. With all of the knowledge we have about the harmful effects of tobacco use, there are still some who have not received the message and as a result, more than 7 million people die each year from the effects of tobacco.
A few of the initiatives that the World Health Organization is trying to implement to inform people about tobacco’s harmful effects are:
• Increase public knowledge of the risks of smoking and second hand smoke
• Encourage healthcare providers to speak to their patients about the hazards of tobacco
• Encourage governmental  support for educational programs
• Seek ways to promote smoke free zones in buildings and public spaces
• Increase taxes on tobacco products
• Make it more difficult to purchase tobacco products
• Ban tobacco advertising
If you use tobacco products and would like to quit, speak to your provider. Flushing Hospital offers a tobacco cessation program  to help you. Please call 718-206-8494 to learn more.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Emotional Eating

Have you ever turned to food not because you were hungry but because you needed to relieve stress? Many of us have turned to food to get us through rough patches in our lives. When we turn to food for emotional comfort this is referred to as emotional eating. For most people this  emotional eating can occur over a short duration of time, and for others, seeking emotional relief through food can last for years.
People indulge in emotional eating for many reasons, all in the hopes that it will get them through their relationship problems, financial issues, work conflicts, school problems, health crisis, or just being bored. Food also acts as a  distraction from our problems because we will concentrate on what we are eating and not the source of the problem. Most of the time we will pick the kind of foods that are high in sugar for that burst of energy that it will provide.
Some suggested activities to help avoid emotional eating:
• Try taking a walk
• Spend time with a friend just chatting
• Clean your home
• Go to the library and read a book
• Listen to music
• Try meditation
There are ways to get relief from emotional eating issues. One of the best ways is to work on the issue causing you stress. This may require getting professional help if the problem persists. You would also want to avoid having unhealthy snacks that are easily accessible. Try to arrange to eat regular meals that are healthy for you so that you won’t crave snacks during the day. If you are still having difficulty managing your issues and the only thing that seems to help is eating, you might want to consult a physician who can help you. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month which serves to make people more familiar with the disease and ways to prevent it. Hepatitis is defined as an inflammation of the liver and can be caused by alcohol abuse, exposure to certain toxins, drug abuse, bacterial or viral infections. Many people aren’t even aware that they have hepatitis. The three main types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. Each year approximately 15,000 people die in the United States die from either liver cancer or chronic liver disease caused by hepatitis.

Hepatitis A can be mild or severe and can last weeks to months. It is spread by contact with food, liquids and objects that are infected with fecal matter from a person who is infected. Hepatitis B can be a life long illness. It is transmitted by blood, semen, other bodily fluids and as a baby passes through the birth canal. Hepatitis C is spread through sharing needles and syringes with people who are infected. It also used to be spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants but better screening techniques have virtually eliminated this risk.

Hepatitis awareness is important in making prevention better understood. A vaccine exists for Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B for populations that may be at risk. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital to discuss this illness please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Nurses Week

National Nurses  Week is celebrated each year beginning on May 6th and ending on May 12th, Florence Nightingdale’s birthday.  The first National Nurses Week was celebrated in 1954, but wasn’t officially recognized until many years later.  In 1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation making May 6th National Recognition Day for Nurses, and this was later expanded to a whole week by American Nurses Association in 1990
The purpose of this week long celebration is to educate the public on the important role nurses play in healthcare and in our lives. Every year a different theme is selected by the American Nurses Association that highlights a different aspect of what nursing does. The theme for the 2018 National Nurses Week is “Nurses: Inspire. Innovate, and Influence”.
This year, the Nursing Department at Flushing Hospital will hold various activities, including an international food festival. a poster presentation, educational workshops, and wellness and relaxation  activities.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Eyeglasses

Over 60 percent of the adult population in the United States today wears eyeglasses. Modern day eyeglasses have their roots that date back more than 1000 years. In the middle ages Monks were known to use reading stones that were glass spheres, sometimes filled with water,  that were placed on top of objects in order to magnify them. The first documented use of eyeglasses was attributed to being developed in Italy.  In the 13th century Venetian glass blowers made the first solid glass lenses that were held by frames and that were a primitive version of modern day wearable eyeglasses.
In the 17th century eyeglasses started to be made that could correct vision. Glasses could be made with either concave lenses, for nearsightedness, or convex lenses for farsightedness. Benjamin Franklin invented bifocal lenses in 1784. Glass was the material used in the production of eyeglasses for centuries until the latter part of the 20th century when plastic became widely used in eyeglasses as it was lighter and safer than glass. Now many eyeglasses are being made from polycarbonate which is lighter still and more resilient to scratches.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diverticulitis

If you are experiencing prolonged abdominal pain, it is probably a good idea to be checked out to see what is causing it. This type of pain could be something serious. Diverticulitis is a disease affecting the intestinal tract, usually the colon. When tiny pouches are formed in the lining of the intestine they are called diverticula and when they become inflamed it is called diverticulitis.
There are several risk factors that can cause diverticulitis to occur. Age and a diet that is high in fat and low in fiber factor since it affects people more frequently who are over the age of 40. Other risk factors include obesity, a history of smoking and not exercising.
Symptoms of diverticulitis include:
• Loss of appetite
• Fever
• Abdominal cramps
• Upset stomach
• Bloating
Diverticulitis can be diagnosed through a CT scan testing the blood and urine and examining the stool for blood.
Treating diverticulitis is dependent on its severity. In mild cases it may suffice to adopt a bland diet, drink lots of fluids, and to take an antibiotic. Once the condition has healed, adding fiber to the diet will be beneficial to keeping the intestines functioning properly. In more severe cases, surgery may have to be performed.
If you are experiencing signs and symptoms of diverticulitis and would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Testicular Cancer

Although testicular cancer is a rare form of cancer, it is the most common type of cancer diagnosed in men between the ages of 15 and 35.
There are a few risk factors to be considered for testicular cancer but they aren’t definitive reasons men will be diagnosed with it. Caucasian males are at greater risk as are men with a family history of testicular cancer and also men who have abnormalities of testicular development.
Symptoms of testicular cancer
• Dull ache in the abdomen
• Pain in the groin
• Enlarged scrotum
• Pain in one or both testicles
• Back pain
The diagnosis of testicular cancer is made through an ultrasound exam and a  blood test for cancer markers, or surgical intervention surgery if there is a lump. If the diagnosis is positive, it is important to identify the stage, which is determined through  a CT scan, MRI, chest x-ray and a blood test,  and whether it has spread to other parts of the body. If caught in its early stages it can be treated successfully. Treatment  may include total removal of the testicle and possibly the surrounding lymph nodes, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.
If you notice any of the symptoms of the disease and would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.