Employee Spotlight – Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) February Employee Spotlight shines on Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt, ER, RN, Case Manager.  Carmen has been an employee at FHMC for 30 years serving as a Case Manager, Registered Nurse and Pediatrics ICU Nurse.

Denise James, Director of the Case Management and Social Work Department, describes Carmen as a “Dedicated, hardworking individual who goes above and beyond the call of duty.  She is trustworthy, knowledgeable and shares her knowledge with her fellow case managers. To say that Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt exceeds the expectations of employees at FHMC’s Case Management and Social Work Department would be an understatement.”

Since Carmen is assigned to the Emergency Room, as part of her duties, she provides guidance to the healthcare team on meeting criteria for inpatient hospital stays and coordinating safe discharge plans.  She also assists with post hospital-care in addition to providing social support to the patients and families.

As a Case Manager, it is difficult for Carmen to see patients that require further aftercare and cannot afford it or are uninsured.  It is during those times that Carmen rises to the occasion and addresses any challenge she is dealing with.  Her main concern is making the appropriate decision for anyone entrusted in her care.  She is committed to making the best out of any situation.

When not at work Carmen enjoys spending time with her husband of 32 years and her 2 children.  She is very active in her church, loves meeting and talking with people and watching TV, especially romantic movies.

“I don’t believe in complaining as my dad always taught and reminded me how blessed I am.”  These are words that Carmen lives by.

Congratulations Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt on being February’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Valentine’s Day at Flushing Hospital Medical Center

For Valentine’s Day this year the Food and Nutrition Department handed out Valentine’s Day Teddy Bears to patients throughout the hospital.  The patient’s were delighted by their Valentine’s Day surprise.   The Food and Nutrition Department set out to prove that you can share some Valentines’ Day sweetness without the chocolate!   We hope everyone enjoyed the holiday!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is American Heart Health Month

Over 50 years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed the month of February to be American Heart Month in order to bring attention to one of the leading causes of death in the United States. This tradition has been carried on by every President since.

Each year over 800,000 lives are taken as a result of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.  Every 84 seconds someone in the United States dies from the disease and each year approximately 750,000 people experience a heart attack and of those, about 115,000 will not survive.
The American Heart Association recommends the following behavioral modifications to prevent heart disease:
• Avoid smoking
• Engage in some form of daily physical activity
• Follow a healthy diet
• Maintain a healthy body weight
• Control cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels
The death rate from heart disease has been improving slowly over the last decade due to advances in medications, better diagnostic capabilities, and better access to health care, but the statistics are still pretty alarming. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Flushing Hospital, call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Oat Milk

Moooove over cow and goat’s milk, oat milk is the latest lactose-free, protein enriched, low in fat, flavorful choice for the vegan and lactose intolerant lifestyle.

Oat milk is a dairy-free milk alternative that is made from oats. It has a ratio of 1 cup of oats to ¾ cup of water.  The mixture is then strained to create a liquid.

According to https://www.livestrong.com, oat milk is a healthy alternative to whole milk and skim milk.  It is rich in vitamin D, iron, calcium, potassium and fiber.  One cup of store bought oat milk may have up to 120 calories, 5 grams of fat, 3 grams of protein, 14 grams of carbohydrate and 2 grams of fiber.

Comparatively, cow’s milk contains 3.5% fat, 146 calories, 11 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat and skim mild has 83 calories, 122 grams of carbohydrate, 0.2 grams of fat and 8 grams of protein. Even though the numbers for skim milk seem better than oat milk, skim milk still contains lactose.

Consumers are turning to oat milk because it can be a healthier choice for those who are allergic to the lactose in milk, as well as nuts and gluten. Oat milk can be purchased or homemade.  Some opt for the homemade version so there is less risk of cross contamination with wheat, rye, barley and nuts at the manufacturing plant.  This is of great importance for those with allergies or celiac disease.

Oat milk tastes good, comes in flavors and can be used for coffee, cereal or in any way you would use cow’s milk or a milk alternative.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Lunar New Year at Flushing Hospital Medical Center

This year to celebrate Lunar New Year (The Year of the Pig), Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Food and Nutrition Department handed out Mandarin oranges with a Happy New Year card to patients, visitors and staff.  This gesture is in keeping with FHMC’S commitment to cultural sensitivity. The Chinese word for mandarin is kam, which sounds similar to the word for gold.  Therefore, having mandarin oranges with you around New Year is thought to bring fortune into your life.  The patients, staff and visitors were all appreciative.

Happy Lunar New Year!!!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Gregory Buie

This month, Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Employee Spotlight shines on Security Officer Gregory Buie. Gregory has been a security officer for three years and is tasked with securing the hospital premises, protecting its personnel, monitoring the hospital’s closed circuit TV (CCTV), and checking that the proper hospital identification is being displayed on each employee.

Gregory is married, has four children and two grandchildren. When he is not at work, he enjoys traveling, basketball, football and being active in his church.

“The most rewarding part of my job is helping people. Although there can sometimes be differences with personalities, I always remember that the person I’m speaking with may not be feeling well or is worried about a loved one they are there to visit and they deserve my respect and patience.”

We thank Gregory Buie for his valuable services to Flushing Hospital, and recognize him as a great asset to our team.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – Department of Medical Records

January’s Department Spotlight shines on the Medical Records. Under the leadership of Deborah Corwin, Director and Dolores Chin, Assistant Director, the hard working employees of this department make sure that the cataloging and dispersment of medical and personal information within the medical record of every patient is handled confidentially.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Medical Records Department  is located 4500 Parsons Blvd.,  on the first floor adjacent to the hospitals main lobby and their hours of operation are Monday to Friday, from 9AM to 5PM.  If you are interested in a copy of your medical records from Flushing Hospital Medical Center, call 718-670-5424 or 5425.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dr. Tips on Cold and Flu Prevention

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) flu season runs from October through May, with the most recorded cases usually identified during the month of February.

With cold and flu season upon us, Dr. Alexander Kintzoglou, Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Flushing Hospital Medical Center would like to share some cold and flu prevention tips.

  1. Flu Shot – The best measure to take against getting the flu is to get a flu shot. The CDC states that, “Flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses.”
  1. Hand hygiene – No matter what your daily routine is, you will most likely come in contact with other people. By washing your hands frequently, with soap and water, you can prevent receiving germs that may cause the cold or flu. If you are unable to access soap and water, you can use hand sanitizer in a pinch.  Just make sure the product has an alcohol base.
  2. Sanitize – By keeping your surrounding area clean ( i.e. computer station, key board, door knobs, light switches, etc.) you will lessen your risk of catching a cold or the flu.
  3. Shaking hands – Be cautious when shaking hands, especially with people who are sick. Remember to wash your hands after an encounter.
  4. Keep a healthy lifestyle – There is no better immunity builder than good nutrition. By eating right, your body will have the natural antibodies to fight off the cold or flu.
  5. Smoking – By triggering your allergies, which can cause an upper respiratory infection that can weaken your immune system, smoking may make you more susceptible to getting a cold or the flu.

According to Dr. Kintzoglou, “Nobody gets the flu from the flu vaccine.”  He further states, “Receiving a flu shot protects not only yourself, but your friends and family.”  He urges everyone to get vaccinated.

If you would like to get a flu shot, call the Flushing Hospital Medical Center Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of an Annual Physical

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  How would you categorize your commitment to getting an annual physical?

  1. Yearly
  2. Bi-Yearly
  3. When I don’t feel good
  4. I don’t do doctors

Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship between you and your doctor
  • If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Make Your Mental Health a Priority This New Year

Tis’ the season for New Year Resolutions!  We are all talking about shedding some holiday pounds, keeping ourselves more organized or just living our best lives in 2019.  While striving towards those goals, why not included your mental health in this years resolutions?

Did you know that mental illness affects millions of Americans, yet not surprisingly, many of those who need help do not receive it. There are many reasons why – it could be due to limited availability of services, or a strong distrust of others, or those who are mentally ill might have such a sense of hopelessness that they do not seek care.

While all of these are factors as to why someone doesn’t seek support, perhaps the biggest single reason is a sense of fear and shame associated with admitting help is needed. This sense of shame is very common and it is only reinforced by society, which has attached stigmas to mental illness. The beliefs the public has about mental illness leads those who need help to avoid it so they are not labeled as “crazy” and have their condition negatively affect their personal relationships and career goals.

Getting society to overcome the stigmas associated with mental illness is the key to having more individuals come forward, but unfortunately negative attitudes and beliefs toward people who have a mental health condition are common. These stigmas can lead to obvious and direct discrimination, such as someone making a negative remark about mental illness or it may be unintentional or subtle, such as someone avoiding an individual because they assume they could be unstable, violent or dangerous due to mental illness.

Those with mental illness should never be ashamed of their condition and here are some reasons why:

  • According to the World Health Organization, one out of four people will experience mental health problems at some point in their lives.
  • Shame is pretty much guaranteed to make things worse. Feelings of shame are proven to have detrimental effects on our mental and physical health
  • Mental illness is no one’s fault. No one asks to have a mental illness and it is definitely not a choice we make.
  • We’re not ashamed when our bodies get sick, so why should we be ashamed when our minds aren’t in top form.
  • There is no normal – our minds are complex things and no single brain is the same
  • Our mental health doesn’t define us. Don’t let your mental illness become who you are, it is just one aspect of you.

It’s time to speak out against the stigmas associated with mental illness and reframe the way we see it. Getting help is not a sign of weakness. It is a sign of strength.

Flushing Hospital advises anyone who feels they need help to get it.  Don’t let the fear of being labeled with a mental illness prevent you from seeking help. Treatment can provide relief and help you in life.

To make an appointment at Flushing Hospital’s Outpatient Mental Health Center, please call 718-670-5522.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.