Benefits of Grandparents Who Help Raise Grandchildren

Studies have shown that raising grandchildren can be mutually beneficial.  Grandparents provide a stable, safe, loving and fun environment for their grandchildren and the closeness between grandchildren and grandparents may keep older adults sharp, ward off depression, boost social connections, and solidify an important family relationship.

Some positive results of grandparents caring for their grandchildren are:

  • Peace of mind – Parents know that their children are with those who love them and are giving them the time an attention their parents can’t while at work.
  • Financial – Childcare is expensive. Parents may be able to save in lieu of paying the high cost of childcare.
  • Flexibility – If the parents are called in to work on an off day, grandparents are generally ready, willing and able to take on whatever was planned for that day.
  • Health – Many grandparents feel that their grandchildren keep them fit and to a grandchild no one can fix a cut or scrape better than a grandparent.
  • Wisdom – Grandparents can impart great wisdom to your child in a way that is much more absorbable than if a parent tries to impart that same wisdom.

Having grandparents help raise your children is a mostly “pro” scenario, but no situation is a perfect one.  Always have a childcare plan “B” in place in case Grandma and Grandpa need a day off.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

NATIONAL DENTAL HYGIENE MONTH

October is National Dental Hygiene Month and Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) would like to bring awareness to a dental hygiene condition that affects most people, gum disease or gingivitis.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), approximately half of the American population has gum disease or symptoms of it. Affecting women and men alike, no one is excluded from this possible diagnosis- even child are susceptible.

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a contagious bacterial infection that affects the gum tissues and bone that supports the teeth.  Many factors can increase the chances of developing gum disease, such as tobacco use, stress, poor diet, or even genetics.  Hardened plaque, called tartar or calculus, that builds up by the gum line can bring about gingivitis and spread into the underlying bone.  It can start slowly without any pain and may go unnoticed until there is pain.

Some of the symptoms of gum disease can include:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums
  • Gums that bleed when brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Metallic taste
  • Chronic bad breath
  • Deep pockets (the space between gums and the teeth)

While practicing good dental hygiene, such as regular flossing and brushing after meals, can help slow the progression of such a disease, it is important to schedule regular dental check-ups to prevent gum disease or its progression.

Unfortunately, many people go to the dentist only when they experience some sort of pain or symptom. Don’t let this happen to you.  Keep on top of your oral health and make an appointment with your dentist every six months for a dental check- up and deep cleaning.  If you would like to make an appointment with a Board Certified Dentist at Flushing Hospital’s Dental Center, call 718-670-5221 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pumpkin Spice Smoothie

Skip the pricey lattes and try this lower calorie, heart healthy Pumpkin Spice Smoothie recipe courtesy of the American Heart Association.

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Into a blender, add pumpkin, yogurt, milk, oats, honey, pumpkin pie spice, and ice cubes.
  2. Blend until smooth and frothy, about 1 minute. Pour into a glass and serve.

Additional Tips

Cooking Tip: Keeping the can of pumpkin in the fridge before using isn’t necessary, but helps make a colder smoothie.

Keep it Healthy: Make sure to buy 100% pure pumpkin and not pumpkin pie filling or mix, which looks similar but can have added sugar.

Tip: Plain nonfat Greek yogurt, which has more of a tangy taste as well as more protein, can be substituted for the light plain yogurt.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National School Backpack Safety Monthy

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September is National School Backpack Safety Month and Flushing Hospital Medical Center is sharing information on how you can help your child avoid the pain and injury that is associated with carrying heavy backpacks.  These simple tips can help protect your child from having chronic back pain throughout their lives.

Backpacks are essential back-to- school items for kids.  They come in different colors, sizes and shapes and most importantly they help children to carry their belongings.  Backpacks are preferred by many in comparison to shoulder bags because when worn correctly, they evenly distribute weight across the body.  However, if worn incorrectly they can cause back pain or injuries and eventually lead to poor posture.

To prevent problems associated with improper backpack use, parents should first purchase a backpack that has the following features:

  • Lightweight
  • Wide and padded straps
  • Multiple compartments
  • Padded back
  • Waist belt
  • Correct size (A backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso).

Practicing these safety tips will further reduce the chance of back pain or injuries caused by backpacks:

  • When packing, heavier items should be placed to the back and center of the backpack. Lighter items should be in front. Sharp objects such as scissors or pencils should be kept away from your child’s back.  Utilizing different compartments can help in distributing weight.
  • Do not over pack. Doctors recommend that children should not carry backpacks that weigh more than 10-15% of their body weight.
  • Ensure that children use both straps. Using a single strap can cause muscle strain.
  • Adjust the straps so that the backpack fits closely to your child’s back and sits two inches above the waist. This ensures comfort and proper weight distribution.
  • Encourage children to use their lockers or desks throughout the day to drop off heavy books.

The Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America recommends that parents should always look for warning signs that indicate backpacks may be too heavy. If your child struggles to put on and take off the backpack, they are complaining of numbness or tingling or if there are red strap marks on their shoulders -It may be time for you to lighten their load.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Food Safety Education Month

September is National Food Safety Education Month. Designating this observance provides an opportunity to raise awareness about steps you can take to prevent food poisoning.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), every year, an estimated 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from eating contaminated food. Some people are more likely to get a foodborne illness (also called food poisoning) or to get seriously ill.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) would like to share information regarding food poisoning and prevention.

Some foods to avoid in an effort to prevent food poisoning are:

  • raw or undercooked meat and poultry
  • raw or undercooked fish and shellfish
  • canned fish and seafood
  • refrigerated smoked seafood in a cooked dish
  • unpasteurized dairy (milk and eggs)
  • raw or undercooked sprouts (alfalfa, bean, etc.)
  • unwashed fresh vegetables
  • soft cheeses made from unpasteurized milk
  • processed cheeses

To learn more about ways to prevent food poisoning visit: www.cdc.gov/foodsafety

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Air Fryers a Healthier Way to Prepare Your Food?

In a world focused on calorie consumption and step counting, there has been a lot of hullabaloo about Air fryers and the benefit they may have when preparing food.

Air fryers claim to help lower the fat content in foods we would normally steer clear because of their high fat content such as french fries, chicken fingers and egg rolls.

So, how does an air fryer work?

According to Healthline.com, an air fryer is a kitchen appliance used to prepare food. It works by circulating hot air that contains fine oil droplets around the food to produce a crunchy, crispy exterior.

Air fryers are publicized as a healthy alternative to deep fried foods because it does not completely submerging the food in oil,  it only utilizes one tablespoon of oil.

Some pros to air fryers are:

  • They significantly reduce overall calorie intake
  • They are time efficient in that they cook the item quicker
  • There is an easy clean up

The cons of air frying:

  • Consumers can be misled into thinking they can healthy and eat fried food everyday
  • Air frying produces high temperatures at a very fast rate making it more likely to burn your food
  • Air fryers are small and not conducive to feeding a large family

Flushing Hospital Medical Center is committed to bringing you healthy alternatives to your lifestyle. Although we are not endorsing air fryers, anything that lowers the risk of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity are worth having a healthy discussion about.

For more information on air fryers and their benefits, you can visit Healthline.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Melissa Melgar

This month the Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Employee Spotlight shines on Melissa Melgar.

Melissa is a Flushing Hospital Medical Center employee for the past 12 years. She currently holds the title of Office Manager, Psychiatry Administration.

On any given day, Melissa assists with organizing on-call coverage for the Department of Psychiatry, credentialing newly assigned medical professionals and arranging Continuing Medical Education credits (CME).

Additionally, Melissa works with and prepares for the Joint Commission on HealthCare Organizations (JCAHO), Office of Mental Health (OMH), Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASAS) and Department of Health (DOH) prior to and during surveys.

Melissa’s greatest loves are her two children, Matthew age 4 and Maya, age 3.  She spends her free time site seeing, biking, dancing, taking road trips and adventures with her family and friends.

She is also a champion of charities such as Breast Cancer Walk, raising funds for Breast Cancer Research, advocating for heightened awareness for Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome and Ronald McDonald House.

Although her job can, at times, be challenging; Melissa feels that helping others, making a difference in another person’s life and seeing the gratitude in patient’s faces is what makes it all worthwhile.

Melissa Melgar strongly believes that everyone should be made to feel important.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are there Benefits If You Drink Kombucha Tea?

The internet is all a buzz about the benefits of Kombucha Tea, but what is kombucha?

According to the Mayo Clinic, Kombucha tea is a fermented drink made with tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast. Although it’s sometimes referred to as kombucha mushroom tea, kombucha is not a mushroom — it’s a colony of bacteria and yeast. Kombucha tea is made by adding the colony to sugar and tea, and allowing the mix to ferment. The resulting liquid contains vinegar, B vitamins and a number of other chemical compounds.

Some of the professed benefits of Kombucha are:

  • Gut health – the pro-biotics released in the fermentation process are similar to healthy bacteria that are found in the gut. Probiotic bacteria have been linked to helping diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Cancer risk – Some studies show that drinking kombucha may help reduce the risk of cancer.  It’s important to note that these studies were conducted on cells in a test tube.
  • Infection risk – Acetic acid found in vinegar is also found in kombucha after it ferments.
  • Mental Health – Since probiotics have been linked to treating depression and probiotics are evident in kombucha after fermentation, it may help alleviate some of the symptoms of depression.
  • Heart disease – Some studies have found that kombucha helps reduce levels of cholesterol that may cause heart disease.

The Mayo Clinic further reports that there have been adverse effects while using kombucha.  Some people complained of an upset stomach, infections and at times an allergic reaction. This may have been caused because contamination can occur if the tea is brewed in homes with a nonsterile preparation area.

They further state that since there isn’t enough evidence that kombucha tea delivers on its health claims, the safe approach may be to avoid kombucha tea until more definitive information is available.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Hazzards of Cleaning Fluids

Cleaning your home offers an opportunity to get rid of old things and bring a sense of refreshment to your environment, but the process may not always be so pleasant to the senses. Often times, household cleaning products can irritate the eyes, nose and throat and trigger allergic reactions or even an asthma attack.

Sneezing, coughing and itchy skin can be symptoms traced back to chemical allergies found in everyday cleaning products.  We are exposed to hundreds of different chemicals in the products used every day to clean our homes, cars, or offices. If you read the list of ingredients in these cleaning products, you may be surprised to find that many of these ingredients are potentially toxic chemicals which can trigger asthma attacks.

According to the American Lung Association, some products release dangerous chemicals, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Other harmful ingredients include ammonia and bleach. VOCs and other chemicals released when using cleaning supplies contribute to chronic respiratory problems, allergic reactions and headaches.

Cleaning products containing VOCs and other toxic substances can include:

  • Air fresheners
  • Chlorine bleach
  • Detergent and dish washing liquid
  • Dry cleaning chemicals
  • Rug and upholstery cleaners
  • Furniture and floor polish
  • Oven cleaners

The American Lung Association suggests reading all labels on cleaning supplies and household products before you buy them. Choose products that do not contain or have reduced amounts of VOCs, fragrances, irritants and flammable ingredients. Products that are labeled “green” do not necessarily mean they are safer.

As a safer cleaning alternative, warm water and soap often will do the trick, especially at home. Baking soda is good for scrubbing. A mix of vinegar and water can clean glass.

Another helpful tip: when using cleaning or household products, keep the area well ventilated. Never use cleaning products in a small, enclosed space and open windows and doors.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Easy and Delicious Frittata Receipe!

Tired of the same meals night after night?  Try this easy and delicious Frittata receipe.  We bet most of the ingredients are already in your fridge!

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil for drizzling
  • 8 mushrooms, quartered
  • 6 asparagus spears, chopped
  • Salt and ground pepper to taste
  • 12 large eggs
  • ½ cup grated Monterey Jack
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan
  • 2 dashes of hot sauce
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 medium onion, halved and sliced thin
  • 1 cold baked potato, diced
  • ¼ cup chopped green olives with pimentos
  • 2 jarred roasted peppers, sliced thin
  • 8 fresh basil leaves, chopped

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

Drizzle olive oil over the mushrooms and asparagus on a baking sheet, sprinkle with salt and pepper and roast until a nice color is achieved, about 12 minutes. Set aside.

Beat together the eggs with some salt and pepper in a bowl. (Do not over-beat; just mix until the eggs mostly come together.) Stir in the Monterey Jack, Parmesan and hot sauce and set aside.

In a large ovenproof nonstick skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and golden brown, several minutes. Add the diced potatoes, sprinkle with salt and pepper and stir to cook for a couple of minutes. Finally, add the asparagus, mushrooms, olives and roasted red peppers and cook, stirring, until everything is hot.

Make sure all the ingredients are evenly distributed across the bottom of the skillet, then pour in the egg mixture so that it evenly coats everything. Let it sit on the burner for 30 to 45 seconds to set the edges, then put the skillet in the oven. Cook, watching it carefully, until the eggs are set but not very brown on top, 10 to 12 minutes.

Slide the frittata out of the skillet and onto a cutting board. Sprinkle on the basil and slice into wedges with a long serrated knife.

For this and more delicious recipes visit – https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ree-drummond/frittata-2593843

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.