Are there Benefits If You Drink Kombucha Tea?

The internet is all a buzz about the benefits of Kombucha Tea, but what is kombucha?

According to the Mayo Clinic, Kombucha tea is a fermented drink made with tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast. Although it’s sometimes referred to as kombucha mushroom tea, kombucha is not a mushroom — it’s a colony of bacteria and yeast. Kombucha tea is made by adding the colony to sugar and tea, and allowing the mix to ferment. The resulting liquid contains vinegar, B vitamins and a number of other chemical compounds.

Some of the professed benefits of Kombucha are:

  • Gut health – the pro-biotics released in the fermentation process are similar to healthy bacteria that are found in the gut. Probiotic bacteria have been linked to helping diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Cancer risk – Some studies show that drinking kombucha may help reduce the risk of cancer.  It’s important to note that these studies were conducted on cells in a test tube.
  • Infection risk – Acetic acid found in vinegar is also found in kombucha after it ferments.
  • Mental Health – Since probiotics have been linked to treating depression and probiotics are evident in kombucha after fermentation, it may help alleviate some of the symptoms of depression.
  • Heart disease – Some studies have found that kombucha helps reduce levels of cholesterol that may cause heart disease.

The Mayo Clinic further reports that there have been adverse effects while using kombucha.  Some people complained of an upset stomach, infections and at times an allergic reaction. This may have been caused because contamination can occur if the tea is brewed in homes with a nonsterile preparation area.

They further state that since there isn’t enough evidence that kombucha tea delivers on its health claims, the safe approach may be to avoid kombucha tea until more definitive information is available.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Hazzards of Cleaning Fluids

Cleaning your home offers an opportunity to get rid of old things and bring a sense of refreshment to your environment, but the process may not always be so pleasant to the senses. Often times, household cleaning products can irritate the eyes, nose and throat and trigger allergic reactions or even an asthma attack.

Sneezing, coughing and itchy skin can be symptoms traced back to chemical allergies found in everyday cleaning products.  We are exposed to hundreds of different chemicals in the products used every day to clean our homes, cars, or offices. If you read the list of ingredients in these cleaning products, you may be surprised to find that many of these ingredients are potentially toxic chemicals which can trigger asthma attacks.

According to the American Lung Association, some products release dangerous chemicals, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Other harmful ingredients include ammonia and bleach. VOCs and other chemicals released when using cleaning supplies contribute to chronic respiratory problems, allergic reactions and headaches.

Cleaning products containing VOCs and other toxic substances can include:

  • Air fresheners
  • Chlorine bleach
  • Detergent and dish washing liquid
  • Dry cleaning chemicals
  • Rug and upholstery cleaners
  • Furniture and floor polish
  • Oven cleaners

The American Lung Association suggests reading all labels on cleaning supplies and household products before you buy them. Choose products that do not contain or have reduced amounts of VOCs, fragrances, irritants and flammable ingredients. Products that are labeled “green” do not necessarily mean they are safer.

As a safer cleaning alternative, warm water and soap often will do the trick, especially at home. Baking soda is good for scrubbing. A mix of vinegar and water can clean glass.

Another helpful tip: when using cleaning or household products, keep the area well ventilated. Never use cleaning products in a small, enclosed space and open windows and doors.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Easy and Delicious Frittata Receipe!

Tired of the same meals night after night?  Try this easy and delicious Frittata receipe.  We bet most of the ingredients are already in your fridge!

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil for drizzling
  • 8 mushrooms, quartered
  • 6 asparagus spears, chopped
  • Salt and ground pepper to taste
  • 12 large eggs
  • ½ cup grated Monterey Jack
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan
  • 2 dashes of hot sauce
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 medium onion, halved and sliced thin
  • 1 cold baked potato, diced
  • ¼ cup chopped green olives with pimentos
  • 2 jarred roasted peppers, sliced thin
  • 8 fresh basil leaves, chopped

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

Drizzle olive oil over the mushrooms and asparagus on a baking sheet, sprinkle with salt and pepper and roast until a nice color is achieved, about 12 minutes. Set aside.

Beat together the eggs with some salt and pepper in a bowl. (Do not over-beat; just mix until the eggs mostly come together.) Stir in the Monterey Jack, Parmesan and hot sauce and set aside.

In a large ovenproof nonstick skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and golden brown, several minutes. Add the diced potatoes, sprinkle with salt and pepper and stir to cook for a couple of minutes. Finally, add the asparagus, mushrooms, olives and roasted red peppers and cook, stirring, until everything is hot.

Make sure all the ingredients are evenly distributed across the bottom of the skillet, then pour in the egg mixture so that it evenly coats everything. Let it sit on the burner for 30 to 45 seconds to set the edges, then put the skillet in the oven. Cook, watching it carefully, until the eggs are set but not very brown on top, 10 to 12 minutes.

Slide the frittata out of the skillet and onto a cutting board. Sprinkle on the basil and slice into wedges with a long serrated knife.

For this and more delicious recipes visit – https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ree-drummond/frittata-2593843

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

All About Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

 

Summer gives us a break from the flu and many other viruses prevalent during the winter months, but there is one contagious virus that your child is at risk of contracting during the summer.

Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common illness in the summer months, predominantly found in infants and children under the age of 10, but one that can also affect teens and adults. It is caused by a family of viruses known as the Coxsackie virus. There are multiple types of Coxsackie virus, but the A16 strain causes HFMD.

HFMD can produce a wide variety of symptoms, including mild flu-like symptoms such as fever, head and muscle aches, sore throat, fatigue, and poor appetite. The fever usually lasts anywhere from 24 hours to 2-3 days. One or two days after the fever begins, small red spots begin to appear in the mouth, throat, palms of the hands, and soles of the feet. These spots develop into blisters and eventually into painful ulcers, which resolve within a few days without any scarring.

These blisters give the illness its name, but it should not be confused with the similarly named foot (or hoof) and mouth disease, which is found in cattle.

HFMD is spread between children either hand to hand or through tiny air droplets that are released when they sneeze, cough, or blow their nose.  The illness can also be spread when a person is exposed to an infected child’s stool or the fluid from their blisters.

HFMD is contagious and tends to spread most easily in settings where many young children are together, such as day care centers.  In tropical parts of the world, HFMD is present throughout the year, but in cooler climates, such as New York, outbreaks take place only in the summer or fall. Some people incorrectly believe that the illness is spread in swimming pools, but a properly chlorinated pool should kill the virus.

Proper hand washing is considered the best protection against the virus, especially after using the bathroom, changing diapers, and before eating or preparing food. The virus can live on contaminated surfaces for several days. Therefore, parents should clean shared toys and all surfaces potentially contaminated with disinfectant cleaners to protect against the spread of HFMD.

There are lab tests to confirm HFMD, but doctors usually can diagnose the virus based on a physical examination. There is no specific treatment for HFMD. Doctors often recommend over-the-counter pain and fever reducing medications to make your child feel more comfortable. Salt water rinses might also provide relief.

If you think your child has hand, foot and mouth disease, you should see a pediatrician or call Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486 to make an appointment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Designated Baby-Friendly

Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) has received the prestigious international recognition as a Designated Baby-Friendly birth facility. Baby-Friendly USA, Inc is the U.S. authority for the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, a global program sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

The initiative encourages and recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for breastfeeding mothers and their babies. Based on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, this prestigious international award recognizes birth facilities that offer breastfeeding mothers the information, confidence, and skills needed to successfully initiate and continue breastfeeding their babies.

FHMC offers  the following classes free of charge at FHMC:
  • Childbirth education classes on Saturday monthly. Call 718-670-3020
  • Infant feeding classes weekly on Tuesday at 10am Ob/Gyn Ambulatory Care Center on the 5th floor
  • Breastfeeding Support Group weekly, Wednesdays, 1pm 5 West conference room, by appointment 718-670-5201
  • Free tours of the Perinatal area by calling 718-670-5239
  • Women Infants and Children (WIC) office on the 5th floor 718-670-5277

Robert Levine, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at FHMC, congratulated the entire OB/GYN team for their hard work.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dr. Sherman Klein – Lyme Disease

With summer in full swing, we will be spending more time participating in activities outdoors in areas such as parks, forests and hiking trails.  While getting out and keeping physically fit is strongly encouraged it is important to keep in mind that being in these areas can put you at risk for Lyme disease.

Sherman Klein, MD, specializing in Internal Medicine at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center offers the following information on Lyme disease, how it is spread, its symptoms, and treatment.

According to Dr. Klein, Lyme disease is the most common tick-born infection in New York City and in the United States.  On the east coast, Lyme disease is spread by the bite of a black-legged tick infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Not all black-legged ticks carry this bacterium and, even if they are infected, they must be attached for at least 36 – 48 hours after a person is bitten to transmit the disease.

Black-legged ticks are rarely found in NYC, but if you have been traveling in more rural areas of New York such as Westchester and Long Island you are at greater risk of coming into contact with an infected tick.

The annual number of cases of Lyme disease reported continues to rise each year in non-rural communities.

Some of the early warning signs of Lyme disease are:

  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Rash

These signs and symptoms may occur anywhere from three to 30 days after being bitten.  After an infected tick bite, a widening red area may appear at the infected site that is clear in the center, forming a bullseye appearance.

Dr. Klein suggests that the best way to avoid contracting Lyme disease is to avoid direct contact with ticks.  You can do this by avoiding wooded and brushy areas, and high grass.  If you are hiking, try to walk in the center of the trails and wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. If in a wooded area you should use a strong repellent (with Deet).  Dr. Klein cautions that when using any repellent, you should avoid applying the solution to your hands, eyes and mouth.

Some of the tips to find and remove ticks from your body and clothing are:

  • perform a check of your entire body viewing under your arms, behind and in your ears, inside your navel, behind your knees, along your legs, waist and hair. Also, check your pet.
  • Take a shower soon after returning indoors. If you wash within two hours of returning indoors, the ticks are more easily found and washed off your body.
  • Once you are indoors, take your clothing and place them in the wash using hot water and then put them in the dryer on “high” for at least 10 minutes; if the clothes were washed in cold water, place them in the dryer on “high” for at least 90 minutes

If Lyme disease is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body causing arthritis cardiac and nervous system problems.   Dr. Klein is one of the many qualified doctors specializing in Internal Medicine at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.  To schedule an appointment with him, or any of our other doctors, please call 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Lyme Disease Prevention Tips With Dr. Sherman Klein

With summer in full swing, we will be spending more time doing activities outdoors in areas such as parks, forests and hiking trails.  While getting out and keeping physically fit is strongly encouraged it is important to keep in mind that being in these areas can put you at risk for Lyme disease.

Dr. Sherman Klein, MD, specializing in Internal Medicine at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center offers the following information on Lyme disease, how it is spread, its symptoms, and treatment.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-born infection in New York City and in the United States.  On the east coast, Lyme disease is spread by the bite of a black-legged tick infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Not all black-legged ticks carry this bacterium and, even if they are infected, they must be attached for at least 36 – 48 hours after a person is bitten to transmit the disease.

Blacklegged ticks are rarely found in NYC, but if you have been traveling in more rural areas of New York such as Westchester and Long Island you are at greater risk of coming into contact with an infected tick.

The annual number of cases of Lyme disease reported continues to rise each year in non-rural communities.

Some of the early warning signs of Lyme disease are:

  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Rash

These signs and symptoms may occur anywhere from three to 30 days after being bitten.  After an infected tick bite, a widening red area may appear at the infected site that is clear in the center, forming a bull’s eye appearance.

Dr. Klein suggests that the best way to avoid contracting Lyme disease is to avoid direct contact with ticks.  You can do this by avoiding wooded and brushy areas, and high grass.  If you are hiking, try to walk in the center of the trails and wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. If in a wooded area you should use a strong repellent.  Dr. Klein cautions that when using any repellent, you should avoid applying the solution to your hands, eyes and mouth.

Some of the tips to find and remove ticks from your body and clothing are:

  • Do a check of your entire body viewing under your arms, behind and in your ears, inside your navel, behind your knees, along your legs, waist and hair. Also, check your pet.
  • Take a shower soon after returning indoors. If you wash within two hours of returning indoors, the ticks are more easily found and washed off your body.
  • Once you are indoors, take your clothing and place them in the wash using hot water and then put them in the dryer on “high” for at least 10 minutes; if the clothes were washed in cold water, place them in the dryer on “high” for at least 90 minutes

If Lyme disease is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body causing arthritis cardiac and nervous system problems.   Dr. Sherman Klein is one of the many qualified doctors specializing in Internal Medicine at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.  To schedule an appointment with him, or any of our other doctors, please call 718-670-5486

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Today is National HIV Testing Day

June 27th is National HIV Testing Day. There are 1.1 million people living with HIV in the United States, and one in seven are unaware they have the virus.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center, along with other health organizations is working together to raise awareness about the importance of getting tested and early HIV diagnosis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends “that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care.”

We are encouraging people to know their status. There are now more ways than ever to get tested.

Flushing Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center’s offer HIV testing to the community. For a list of our center’s and contact information, please visit https://www.flushinghospital.org/node/8/ambulatory-care

If a patient tests positive we also provide HIV counseling and treatment. We offer integrated clinical care, social and educational services in a comfortable and caring environment.

To receive more information about National HIV Testing Day and to learn more about the virus, please visit, https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/awareness/testingday.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You Living Your Best Life?

We are all in search of finding ways to live our best life.  Often times we base our happiness on when we will have enough money or when a great job comes along or when we find our perfect love match.

That statement begs the question, “Why wait?”  Sometimes happiness arrives without any fanfare and we just begin to feel better.   That single emotional change can, often times, bring change in the other areas of your life.

Here are a few tips to get you moving toward your goal:

  • Live a clutter free life at home and in the office.
  • Learn how to say “no” so that we have more time to say “yes.”
  • Create a realistic budget you can live within.
  • Realize the benefits of exercise.
  • Eat healthy.
  • Walk more.
  • Choose friends with a positive outlook.
  • Don’t take life too seriously.

Recognizing when it is your time to “make it happen” is the key to success.  It may be a bit bumpy in the beginning, but everything that is worthwhile is worth working towards.  Good Luck!

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

According to the Coalition for Headache and Migraine Patients (CHAMP), June is recognized by the federal government as National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month.

More than 38 million people in the United States experience migraines or some type of tension headache with 2 -3 million of them experiencing chronic migraines.

The exact causes of migraines are unknown.  People with migraine or tension headaches may have a tendency to be affected by certain triggers such as fatigue, bright lights, weather changes and hypertension.

Some symptoms of migraine or tension headaches are:

  • Throbbing pain, numbness, weakness
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to sound
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Vertigo
  • Mood changes
  • Neck pain
  • Vision changes

Treatment for migraine or tension headaches depends on the how often or how severe the headache is, the level of disability your headache may cause and contributing medical conditions you may have.

Over the counter medications such as anti-nausea or Ibuprofen may help with more minor episodes, but if you are experiencing multiple headaches per month lasting more than 12 hours, over the counter medications aren’t helping and your migraine symptoms include numbness or weakness, it is best to consult your physician.

If you are experiencing painful migraine or tension headaches, the Ambulatory Care Center at Flushing Hospital Medical Center has convenient hours and days of operation.  To schedule an appointment, call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.