Breastfeeding and Returning to Work

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding and working is a challenge you can overcome.

Here are some suggestions designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier:

1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.

2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.

3. Ask if your company provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.

4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, please contact Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care department at 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Department Spotlight – FHMC SECURITY DEPARTMENT

April’s Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Department Spotlight shines on the Security Department.

Under the leadership of Carmen Altieri, Director, the FHMC security force is tasked with securing the hospital premises, protecting its personnel, patients, and visitors, as well as monitoring the hospital’s closed circuit TV (CCTV), and checking that the proper hospital identification is being displayed on each employee.

“The department creates an environment of safety at FHMC and we are proud of the work we do.”  stated Ms. Altieri.

Congratulations of being April’s Department Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Month

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a condition marked by recurring or alternating bouts of cramps, diarrhea or constipation. It affects an estimated 30 to 45 million people in the United States – or 10 to 15 percent of the population. Despite its prevalence, many people living with this disorder are unaware that they have it and do not receive the necessary treatment and support.

In an attempt to help others gain a better understanding about this condition, April has been designated IBS Awareness Month. During this time, those involved in this effort will look to focus attention on important health messages about IBS diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues.

There are many obstacles in raising awareness about IBS. One of the biggest hurdles is getting people to openly discuss their condition. Even though the disorder is very common, many with IBS are reluctant to openly talk about their symptoms or seek medical care. They may feel uncomfortable discussing their symptoms, even with their doctor, because of social taboos surrounding bowel symptoms.

In addition, IBS is often mischaracterized as a trivial condition, but it is actually one of the most prevalent and burdensome chronic issues reported by patients. IBS has been cited as one of the leading causes of work absenteeism (second only to the common cold) and its symptoms also have a profound impact on the personal and professional activities of those living with it.

Another obstacle that many that IBS encounter is that there is still so much that is unknown about the disease. IBS symptoms result in no damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) system, making it difficult to diagnose. In addition, even though there are many theories regarding what causes IBS, there is no known official cause for the condition.  There is also no official test to diagnose IBS and there is no cure.

In an effort to help those living with IBS, many health care professionals suggest patients learn all that they can about their condition, including identifying those things that seem to make their symptoms worse. Most importantly, people with IBS are encouraged to talk openly with their doctor about IBS so they can help them better manage their condition through improved lifestyle choices and medication therapy aimed to relieve symptoms.

Flushing Hospital is committed to joining the fight to raise awareness and addressing misconceptions about IBS to help those affected get diagnosed and receive appropriate care.

To schedule an appointment to speak with one of Flushing Hospital’s doctors, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do you have Menorrhagia

According to the Mayo Clinic, menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding.

Women with menorrhagia are unable to continue their normal activities when they are menstruating or have their “period”.  When their period arrives, it is accompanied by abnormally heavy bleeding, clotting and cramping.

Some common signs and symptoms of menorrhagia are:

  • Saturated sanitary pads or tampons every hour for several hours
  • Bleeding for longer than a week
  • Passing blood clots larger than a quarter
  • Presenting with signs of anemia, lethargy, fatigue or shortness of breath

Menorrhagia can be caused by a hormone imbalance, dysfunctional ovaries, uterine fibroids, polyps, adenomyosis, and/or cancer.

Although heavy menstrual bleeding is a common concern, most women don’t experience enough blood loss to be defined as menorrhagia.

If you are experiencing heavier than normal periods and would like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital‘s Women’s Health Center please call 718-670-5486 to schedule an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital’s Employee Spotlight Shines on our New Qualified Medical Interpreters

March’s Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) Employee Spotlight shines on a group of employees who recently completed the Qualified Medical Interpreter Training program (QMI).

Many of the patients who are treated at FHMC are fluent in a language other than English.  If their care and diagnosis instructions are not given to them in their natural language, they may not completely understand their health issues and what assistance they will need after discharge.

The employees who were certified work in various departments throughout FHMC and will now be able to provide face-to-face language assistance for Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients.

The 14 amazing employees who are now Qualified Medical Interpreter’s are:

Spanish –

  • Elba Cabrera
  • Cinthia Fajardo
  • Tatiano Giraldo
  • Anthony OlivioJack
  • Davila

Mandarin –

  • Shumin Lin
  • Amy Xueyun Zou
  • Yawen Yen
  • Linda Fu
  • Amy Lam
  • Fiona Chen
  • Chai Jiang
  • Xiao Ping You
  • Qin Cang

Flushing Hospital will continue its commitment to grow in cultural sensitivity and train as many QMI’s as possible over the next few months to reach a goal of 100 QMI’s or more.

Congratulations go out to all the new QMI’s !

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What you should know about Type 1 (T1D) Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise and what has significantly increased is the rate of type 1 diabetes (T1D), formerly known as “juvenile” or “juvenile onset” diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that more than 13,000 children and young people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.

T1D is often first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. However, people may develop T1D at any age. The exact cause of T1D is unknown, there is no cure and it cannot be outgrown. In most cases of T1D, the body’s own immune system, which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses, mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Doctors believe genetics may play a role in this process, and exposure to certain environmental factors, such as viruses, may trigger the disease.

Symptoms for T1D include:
• Increased thirst
• Frequent urination
• Bedwetting in children who previously didn’t wet the bed during the night
• Extreme hunger
• Unintended weight loss
• Irritability and other mood changes
• Fatigue and weakness
• Blurred vision
• In females, frequent vaginal yeast infections

The good news is that it can be controlled with insulin therapy, exercise and diet. A simple blood test can identify type 1 diabetes. Be sure to consult with a physician if you or a family member is experiencing any of the above symptoms by contacting Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-670-5486.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center Celebrates Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day

Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) joins the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in celebrating National Dietitian Nutritionist Day, today, Wednesday, March 13th.  As the nation’s food and nutrition experts, registered dietitian nutritionists are committed  to improving the health of their patients, clients and communities.  We applaud their great work!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Endometriosis Awareness Month

Endometriosis Awareness takes the spotlight during the month of March with a mission to raise awareness about the disease which currently affects an estimated 176 million women around the globe.

Endometriosis occurs when the tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus- grows outside the uterus. This abnormal growth of tissue can commonly be found on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, ligaments that support the uterus, as well as areas between the rectum and vagina.  Areas where endometriosis is less commonly found are the lungs, thighs, arms and other areas beyond the reproductive organs or lower abdomen.

Endometrial tissue develops into growths or clumps called implants.  These clusters of tissue respond to the menstrual cycle the same as they would inside the uterus.  Meaning, each month the tissue builds up, breaks down then sheds.  Unlike the tissue that lines the inside of the uterus; endometrial tissue cannot be discharged from the body through vaginal bleeding.  This results in inflammation, swelling, the formation of scar tissue or internal bleeding.

The symptoms of endometriosis typically present themselves during reproductive years- on average between the ages of 12 to 60 years old.  Symptoms include:

  • Painful sexual intercourse
  • Pain during pelvic examinations
  • Severe pain during menstruation
  • Pain during urination or a bowel movement
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Infertility

The cause of endometriosis is unknown but several factors such as genetics, retrograde period flow, immune system disorders and hormones are being researched.

Most cases are diagnosed in women between the ages of 25 to 35 years of age; however, some women with endometriosis remain undiagnosed because they do not have symptoms and the disorder is sometimes mistaken for other conditions.

Women who do experience symptoms should speak with their doctor about receiving tests such as pelvic examinations, laparoscopy and imaging tests, to find out if they  have endometriosis.

Although there is no cure for endometriosis, effective treatments including medication, surgery and alternative therapies are available.

If you are experiencing the symptoms it is recommended that you make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible. If you would like to make an appointment with a gynecologist, please call 718-670-8994.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt

Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s (FHMC) February Employee Spotlight shines on Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt, ER, RN, Case Manager.  Carmen has been an employee at FHMC for 30 years serving as a Case Manager, Registered Nurse and Pediatrics ICU Nurse.

Denise James, Director of the Case Management and Social Work Department, describes Carmen as a “Dedicated, hardworking individual who goes above and beyond the call of duty.  She is trustworthy, knowledgeable and shares her knowledge with her fellow case managers. To say that Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt exceeds the expectations of employees at FHMC’s Case Management and Social Work Department would be an understatement.”

Since Carmen is assigned to the Emergency Room, as part of her duties, she provides guidance to the healthcare team on meeting criteria for inpatient hospital stays and coordinating safe discharge plans.  She also assists with post hospital-care in addition to providing social support to the patients and families.

As a Case Manager, it is difficult for Carmen to see patients that require further aftercare and cannot afford it or are uninsured.  It is during those times that Carmen rises to the occasion and addresses any challenge she is dealing with.  Her main concern is making the appropriate decision for anyone entrusted in her care.  She is committed to making the best out of any situation.

When not at work Carmen enjoys spending time with her husband of 32 years and her 2 children.  She is very active in her church, loves meeting and talking with people and watching TV, especially romantic movies.

“I don’t believe in complaining as my dad always taught and reminded me how blessed I am.”  These are words that Carmen lives by.

Congratulations Carmen DeSuza-Tobitt on being February’s Employee Spotlight!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Valentine’s Day at Flushing Hospital Medical Center

For Valentine’s Day this year the Food and Nutrition Department handed out Valentine’s Day Teddy Bears to patients throughout the hospital.  The patient’s were delighted by their Valentine’s Day surprise.   The Food and Nutrition Department set out to prove that you can share some Valentines’ Day sweetness without the chocolate!   We hope everyone enjoyed the holiday!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.